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Regionalism : Cincinnati In The News

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Jobs getting farther from home in U.S. cities


Jobs are moving farther away from where employees live, according to the Brookings Institution, which looked at U.S. Census Bureau data from 2000 to 2012 for the country's largest 96 metropolitan areas. The number of jobs within a typical commuting distance dropped by 7 percent for suburban residents during those years and dropped by 3 percent for city residents.

"Closeness to workplaces affects people differently," says an article on the findings in Governing Magazine. "While higher earning workers can afford to drive long distances to work, not everyone can. Being close to jobs affects how long black, female and older workers are unemployed more than other groups. For poor residents, having jobs nearby also increases their chances of working and leaving welfare."

Brooking calculated the typical commuting distance in Greater Cincinnati to be 8.7 miles. The shortest typical work commute among the 96 metro areas was in Stockton-Lodi, Calif., at 4.7 miles, and the longest was in Atlanta at 12.8 miles.

Read the full story here.
 

Tolls on the rise as highway funding dries up


With shortfalls in federal transportation spending and the Highway Trust Fund, the Brookings Institution's Robert Puentes says that states and localities are exploring more tolls to support new capacity and other ongoing improvements.

"In 2013, for instance, tolls covered about 5,400 miles across all interstate and non-interstate roadways nationally, a 15.1 percent jump since 2003," he writes. "Toll roads have expanded their mileage by nearly 350 miles, or 7 percent, since 2011 alone. By comparison, total system mileage has grown by only 3.6 percent over the past decade."

Which leads us, as always, to stalled discussions over replacing the Brent Spence Bridge — where tolls seem to be an inevitability except to the Kentucky legislators who control the project.

Cincinnati Magazine partnered with UC's Niehoff Urban Studio recently to look at the future of transportation, including an interesting option to build the new highway bridge west of Longworth Hall (see rendering above).

Read the full Brookings article here.
 

Cincinnati #3 among U.S. cities in company growth and relocation


Site Selection magazine and website has unveiled its ranking of the top U.S. cities for economic activity, based on the number of companies expanding or relocating, and Cincinnati ranks third behind Chicago and Houston and ahead of Dallas and Atlanta. There were 196 expansion/relocation projects in Greater Cincinnati in 2014, according to the rankings.

The report includes a nice feature section about Cincinnati under the headline "All-Star Success in an All-Star City."

"Several years ago Major League Baseball selected Cincinnati to be the site of the 2015 All Star Game," the article says. "But the city on the banks of the Ohio River has been a top choice for companies for long time and last year it climbed three spots, from number six to number three, among Site Selection’s Top Metros."

The section highlights decisions by ThyssenKrupp Bilstein and Empower to expand in this region instead of moving out and quotes Johnna Reeder, president and CEO of the Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI): “While other regions fought to hang on during the 2008 recession, Cincinnati doubled down with investment in infrastructure and housing. It’s created an environment where new companies are moving to town and expanding. Cincinnati is hot right now.”

Read the full story here.
 

New York Times: "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives"


The Feb. 25 issue of The New York Times carries a glowing report, "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives as Riots' Memories Recede," in its real estate section. Read the full article online here.

Times writer Keith Schneider focuses on the high-profile downtown development projects we're familiar with — General Electric's new operations center on The Banks, Dunnhumby's new headquarters building at Fifth and Race, 3CDC's work at Fountain Square and in Over-the-Rhine — to describe Cincinnati as coming a long way since the 2001 riots. Nice photos by Mark Lyons, too.


 

Kansas City pulls together bistate transit authority to drive economic development


The former mayor of Kansas City, Kan., has been named to the newly created position of Kansas City Area Transportation Authority CEO, with a mandate to pull together four different bus systems in the region (across two states) and connect them seamlessly with the city's under-construction downtown streetcar line. So reports The Kansas City Star — the kind of story you likely won't be reading any time soon in the Cincinnati media.

The Transportation Authority board was looking for someone with the leadership and public relations skills to build consensus for an improved transportation system that, the article claims, "many say is underfunded, struggles in a car-centric city, and suffers from service gaps that make it challenging for suburban riders to use anytime but during the morning and afternoon rush hours."

"(Joe) Reardon’s job will be to expand and unify the region’s fractured public transit system at a time when transit is seen as a key driver of economic development," the article says, then quotes Reardon: "I think a unified transit system is a key component to moving Kansas City as a region forward."

Good thing we're OK with the status quo of Cincinnati's multiple, unconnected transit systems. The region's just fine as is, thank you.

Read the full story here.
 

Eastern Corridor project: A road no one wants?


The Ohio Department of Transportation's ongoing study of the Eastern Corridor — featuring a widened and rerouted State Rte. 32, commuter rail between downtown and Milford and new bike paths — is being called "The $1.4 Billion Road No One Seems to Want" in a new Streetsblog USA post from writer Angie Schmitt.

Noting strong opposition to the Eastern Corridor plan from impacted communities such as Newtown, Mariemont and Madisonville, Schmitt asks, "Has Ohio DOT decided to shelve it? Nope. Instead, the Federal Highway Administration recently hired a third-party mediator to reach an agreement between Ohio DOT and the highway opponents. The mediator’s report recommended eight possibilities. One is a 'no-build' option, and the other seven are less harmful variations on the Eastern Corridor idea."

Read the full post here.

Nation's mayors want federal help on infrastructure


The U.S. Conference of Mayors' winter meeting last week in Washington, D.C. produced a resounding call for federal government help with urban transportation and infrastructure issues. President Obama signaled his support, calling on Congress to pass a bipartisan infrastructure plan In his State of the Union address.

“We’re all focused on infrastructure,” San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee told The Washington Post. “We think that that’s probably one of the best foundations for our economy, job creation, and we’re true believers in that.”

Read the full story here.
 

Cincinnati beer named one of 100 best on the planet

Rhinegeist Truth, a Cincinnati-brewed India Pale Ale, has been named one of the 100 best beers in the world by lifestyle magazine Men's Journal. Read more.

What it takes to build a startup city: Meet 7 mayors promoting entrepreneurship

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, for the first time in history, has included operational support for Cincinnati’s startup ecosystem in the city’s budget. Read more.

Two local universities among 'Smartest Public Colleges In America'

The University of Cincinnati and Miami University both made Business Insider's list of the 100 Smartest Public Colleges In America. Find out why.

The 5 coolest new parks and public spaces in the US

Urban Land Institute has announced its Open Space Awards, celebrating five exceptional new parks and public spaces across the U.S. and Cincinnati's Washington Park made the list. Read more.

Start-up program teaches business, life values

Ten companies from around the world will move to Cincinnati in January for a rare start-up accelerator experience. Read more.

Check out Cincinnati's new cool

Long known for its industrial past, Cincinnati is getting new life from craft breweries, bold new restaurants and a major neighborhood transformed. Read more.

Know a Theatre: Know Theatre of Cincinnati

Taking a page from The Colbert Report's sporadic Better Know a District Congressional interview feature (but minus the satiric intent), American Theatre has inaugurated a new series to introduce the national theatre audience to a different theatre every other week, starting with Cincinnati's Know Theatre. Read more.

Japps named one of America's best bourbon bars

The Bourbon Review has named Japps among America’s 60 Best Bourbon Bars. Read more.
448 Regionalism Articles | Page: | Show All
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