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Non-Profit : Cincinnati In The News

25 Non-Profit Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati Public Library improves to fifth busiest in U.S.


The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County checked out more than 18 million items in 2014, making it the fifth busiest public library system in the U.S., according to a new Public Library Data Service statistical report. In last year’s report (2013 usage data), the Library was the sixth busiest library in the U.S.

The 2015 report is based on survey responses collected from more than 1,800 public libraries in the U.S. and Canada for fiscal year 2014. It's published each year by the Public Library Association, the largest division of the American Library Association.

Read the full Cincinnati Business Courier story here.
 

All signs point to Cincinnati


American Sign Museum was featured in a travel story in yesterday's Sunday Philadelphia Inquirer, the second time this year the funky Camp Washington museum has received national media coverage.

"For a guy who has spent his life around signs, Tod Swormstedt sure has a difficult name to fit on one," the article says in introducing the local icon. "He's the founder of the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, a celebration of the art of signage, from painted wooden panels to wildly lighted neon extravaganzas."

Writers Larissa and Michael Milne get in the requisite mention of Cincinnati chili at the end, pointing readers/visitors to nearby Camp Washington Chili.

Read the full Philadelphia Inquirer story here.
 

Union Terminal the most beautiful place in Ohio


Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published a list of the most beautiful places in all 50 states, and their choice for Ohio is Union Terminal, home of the Cincinnati Museum Center. It's one of only two buildings highlighted across the U.S., with most of the beauty spots being parks, lakes, mountains, beaches and other natural wonders.

Calling Union Terminal "the greatest cultural advance Cincinnati has given the world since the Ickey Shuffle," Thrillist likes the combination of multiple museums featuring "large-scale models of the city and replicas of ancient caves that you can actually walk through" and "Gilded Age architecture that denotes an old-school rail station."

Read the full Thrillist story and list here.
 

WSJ highlights Cincinnati Art Museum show in Japanese art roundup


The Wall Street Journal's Arts section reviews historic Japanese art now on display in three museums across the U.S.: Cincinnati Art Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, Calif.

"Whether a black-and-gold lacquer box or the vibrant print of a cresting wave, a samurai’s helmet or a flowing silk kimono, Japanese works are a familiar sight in museums across the U.S. today," writes WSJ art critic Lee Lawrence. "Three shows currently on view provide insights into how this came to be."

Cincinnati Art Museum's "Masterpieces of Japanese Art" exhibition is on display through Aug. 30 in Eden Park.

Read the full Wall Street Journal article here.
 

Fodor's ranks Cincinnati Zoo in top 10 U.S. zoos


Fodor's, one of the best-known names in travel guides, has published its list of the 10 best U.S. zoos and included Cincinnati Zoo.

"These ten zoos deliver local wildlife experiences where endangered species are nurtured, ferocious predators are kept within feet of the public, and a renaissance of education in conservation and science is incorporated throughout, promising fun for the whole family," the list's introduction says.

Cincinnati Zoo is praised for its animal demonstrations and talks; choice opportunities to feed giraffes and watch elephants bathe and cheetahs run; and for being the nation's second oldest zoo.

"(Cincinnati) zoo has a long history of animal conservation and animal awareness initiatives, including Project Saving Species, a fund that channels money throughout the world to projects dedicated to animal welfare," the story says.

Check out the full list here.
 

3CDC, CDF awarded $87 million in federal tax credits


Cincinnati's two premier nonprofit economic development organizations, 3CDC and Cincinnati Development Fund (CDF), have received federal New Market Tax Credits totaling more than $87 million, the Business Courier reported June 15. The announcement comes a year after neither received them, a big disappointment that temporarily slowed their respective investment plans.

3CDC, through its Cincinnati New Markets Fund, was awarded $45 million and CDF $42.35 million.

"The tax credits help plug gaps in financing for difficult projects located in areas from which private developers shy away," the Business Courier article says.

Upcoming 3CDC projects that might utilize the tax credits include housing and retail on Race Street and additional food/drink options in Over-the-Rhine as well as Memorial Hall, Music Hall and Ziegler Park renovations. Cincinnati Development Fund likely will invest in additional homeownership projects and could free up additional funds for its new facilities and equipment loan program for nonprofits.

Read the full Business Courier story here.
 

Cincinnati Symphony's stability, growth in stark contrast to many other U.S. orchestras


The New York Times took notice of last week's announcements from Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra about its successful fundraising campaign and a new musician contract that will allow it to hire 14 more full-time players over the next four years. Classical music writer Michael Cooper says that the CSO's expansion of the ensemble to 90 members is in stark contrast to many other orchestras around the country, from Philadelphia to Atlanta, that are shedding positions to save money.

"The orchestra world is all too familiar with vicious cycles of mounting deficits, dwindling audiences, difficulty raising money and cuts," Cooper writes. "But at the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, things are moving happily in the opposite direction: think crescendo, not diminuendo."

Read the full story here.
 

Cincinnati Opera gets national nod in opera guide for beginners


HuffPost Arts & Culture has published what it calls "Your Definitive Guide to Going to the Opera," with tips about which operas to see depending on your tastes in movies, what to wear and what to do at intermission.

"Because opera is not a mainstream form of entertainment, it is often regarded as a pretentious one, something untouchable," the article begins. "However, if you give it a fighting chance, you'll find that opera can be enjoyed by classical musicians and complete newcomers alike — old to young."

The section concludes with a photo slideshow of America's top 14 opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera. Strangely, the photo they use to illustrate Cincinnati Opera is of a solo pianist in an empty Music Hall — the exact opposite of the local company's lavish productions, amazing sets and live orchestra.

Read the full story here.
 

Louis Langree says "Bonjour, Cincinnati!"


Vanity Fair's February issue includes a quick interview with Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Music Director Louis Langree, focusing on his role with the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra in New York City's Lincoln Center. They do ask him how he's getting used to being in the hinterlands of Cincinnati, far from his French homeland.

"Yes, I’m French," Langree says, noting Cincinnati's collective German heritage, "but I come from Alsace, which is French with some German DNA."

Read the interview here.

Price Hill: A Cincinnati neighborhood climbs back

There is a palpable sense of investment in Price Hill. People cut their lawns and paint the trim. A locally-owned coffee house opened. Across from the coffee shop, real estate investor Bill Burwinkel transformed a derelict, century-old building into an art gallery and high-end apartments. Tom Croft, who restored his aging Italianate home to perfection, meets weekly with his neighbors to brainstorm about local problems. Young families and urban professionals are moving in, along with a Guatemalan and North African immigrant population that gives Price Hill a rich diversity, in evidence from the Kroger’s ethnic food aisle to the community garden. Read more.

How to take care of a lost puppy

An adorable stuffed puppy was left at ArtsWave’s booth during Cincinnati's LumenoCity, and the nonprofit was on a mission to find the puppy’s owner. Follow the puppy's adventures and joyful reunion with its owner.

15 Gorgeous Photos of the old Cincinnati Library

As with all search engine friendly-headlines, this one from BuzzFeed says it all: 15 Gorgeous Photos of the old Cincinnati Library.

See the images and cutlines here.

Cincinnati ranks as 'smart city'

Movato.com's list of 'America's Smartest Cities' ranks Cincinnati as number 9.

See the full story here.

Struggling women sad, angry over sale of nonprofit Ohio home that will become a boutique hotel

After losing a two-year fight with a Fortune 500 company determined to buy their beautiful, 104-year-old property and turn it into a boutique hotel the women of the Anna Louise Inn have to leave the neighborhood.

Read the full story here.

Charlie Sheen donates $50,000 to Reds Community Fund

Actor Charlie Sheen, a lifelong Cincinnati Reds fan, has pledged to donate $50,000 to the team’s Community Fund, matching the amount broadcaster Marty Brennaman raised for charity in return for having his head shaved on the field.

Read the full story here.
25 Non-Profit Articles | Page: | Show All
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