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Leadership : Cincinnati In The News

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Search is on for next great urban innovation idea


Governing Magazine's City Accelerator section is all about "local government innovations that make a difference in the lives of city residents," and the current push is a collaboration with Citi Foundation and Living Cities to reinvigorate local democracy in American cities. Seven cities are finalists in a contest of sorts to get help developing the systems, skills and knowledge to adopt innovative approaches into their normal course of business.

Cincinnati isn't one of the finalists, but these cities are: Albuquerque, Atlanta, Baltimore, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, New Orleans and Seattle. Each city is pitching a specific project it needs help with, from engaging immigrant entrepreneurs to involving residents in updating the city's 20-year comprehensive plan. Each city has a video pitch on the site.

You can vote for and comment on your favorite pitches, and judges will take your votes into consideration when making final decisions on the winners.

Read the full story here.
 

Forbes ranks Cincinnati as #5 most affordable U.S. city


Cincinnati continues to get kudos for our affordability, this time from Forbes, which ranks Cincinnati #5 on its list of the 20 most affordable U.S. cities. Last week HSH mortgage brokers ranked Cincinnati the fourth cheapest among 27 major U.S. cities for the salary needed to pay a mortgage on the median home price.

Forbes based its ranking on housing costs, too, but added a cost of living index that measures the cost of food, utilities, gas, transportation, medical expenses and other daily expenses in each area.

Birmingham, Ala. was ranked the #1 most affordable city, and several others in our region scored highly: Dayton #8, Indianapolis #9, Columbus and Detroit #10 (tie), Louisville #13 and Akron #15.

Brian Carley, President and CEO of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, gets a prominent mention in the ranking's introduction, offering one explanation for our affordability: “Nobody’s looking to gouge anybody. Instead, everything’s reasonably priced.” Well, that's a relief!

Read the full Forbes story here.

 

Cincinnati #3 among U.S. cities in company growth and relocation


Site Selection magazine and website has unveiled its ranking of the top U.S. cities for economic activity, based on the number of companies expanding or relocating, and Cincinnati ranks third behind Chicago and Houston and ahead of Dallas and Atlanta. There were 196 expansion/relocation projects in Greater Cincinnati in 2014, according to the rankings.

The report includes a nice feature section about Cincinnati under the headline "All-Star Success in an All-Star City."

"Several years ago Major League Baseball selected Cincinnati to be the site of the 2015 All Star Game," the article says. "But the city on the banks of the Ohio River has been a top choice for companies for long time and last year it climbed three spots, from number six to number three, among Site Selection’s Top Metros."

The section highlights decisions by ThyssenKrupp Bilstein and Empower to expand in this region instead of moving out and quotes Johnna Reeder, president and CEO of the Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI): “While other regions fought to hang on during the 2008 recession, Cincinnati doubled down with investment in infrastructure and housing. It’s created an environment where new companies are moving to town and expanding. Cincinnati is hot right now.”

Read the full story here.
 

Rockfish's Dave Knox featured in AdAge "40 Under 40"


Advertising Age magazine is out with its "40 Under 40" list of the top rising talent in the U.S. advertising community that features Rockfish Chief Marketing Officer Dave Knox, 34.

"This year's class of achievers have many varied accomplishments, but they all share one trait," the special section introduction says. "They are smart forward-thinkers who will be driving the business for years to come."

Ad Age makes note of Knox's work at Procter & Gamble, his launch role with The Brandery, his prized possessions and his teenage run-in with a wooden fence.

Read the full list here.
 

New York Times: "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives"


The Feb. 25 issue of The New York Times carries a glowing report, "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives as Riots' Memories Recede," in its real estate section. Read the full article online here.

Times writer Keith Schneider focuses on the high-profile downtown development projects we're familiar with — General Electric's new operations center on The Banks, Dunnhumby's new headquarters building at Fifth and Race, 3CDC's work at Fountain Square and in Over-the-Rhine — to describe Cincinnati as coming a long way since the 2001 riots. Nice photos by Mark Lyons, too.


 

Soapbox on WVXU


Soapbox Publisher Dacia Snider and Managing Editor John Fox appeared Feb. 23 on "Cincinnati Edition" on WVXU (91.7 FM) to discuss how reading and reporting local news is shifting from newspapers to online outlets. We shared the segment with Northern Kentucky Tribune Editor and Publisher Judith Clabes and Special Projects Editor Mike Farrell.

Here's how "Cincinnati Edition" describes the segment: "As the decline of newspaper print circulation continues, the number of people who turn to Facebook, Twitter and other social media for short, almost real-time news updates is on the rise. Yet there is still a desire for credible journalism and thoughtful, well-written reporting, especially when it comes to local news. More and more readers are now finding that type of local content online."

Listen to the full interview here.
 

Kansas City pulls together bistate transit authority to drive economic development


The former mayor of Kansas City, Kan., has been named to the newly created position of Kansas City Area Transportation Authority CEO, with a mandate to pull together four different bus systems in the region (across two states) and connect them seamlessly with the city's under-construction downtown streetcar line. So reports The Kansas City Star — the kind of story you likely won't be reading any time soon in the Cincinnati media.

The Transportation Authority board was looking for someone with the leadership and public relations skills to build consensus for an improved transportation system that, the article claims, "many say is underfunded, struggles in a car-centric city, and suffers from service gaps that make it challenging for suburban riders to use anytime but during the morning and afternoon rush hours."

"(Joe) Reardon’s job will be to expand and unify the region’s fractured public transit system at a time when transit is seen as a key driver of economic development," the article says, then quotes Reardon: "I think a unified transit system is a key component to moving Kansas City as a region forward."

Good thing we're OK with the status quo of Cincinnati's multiple, unconnected transit systems. The region's just fine as is, thank you.

Read the full story here.
 

Choremonster, Lisnr make list of Upstart 100 driving the "new economy"


The CEOs of two Cincinnati startups — Chris Bergman of Choremoster and Rodney Williams of Lisnr — are featured in Upstart 100, a list of "the inventors, visionaries, masters and more driving the new economy" as proclaimed by Upstart Business Journal, a national online publication owned by Cincinnati Business Courier's parent company.

Other figures named to the list include Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Steve Case, Jay Z and Taylor Swift, so the local entrepreneurs are in excellent company.

Read the full list and accompanying editor's note here.

 

Eastern Corridor project: A road no one wants?


The Ohio Department of Transportation's ongoing study of the Eastern Corridor — featuring a widened and rerouted State Rte. 32, commuter rail between downtown and Milford and new bike paths — is being called "The $1.4 Billion Road No One Seems to Want" in a new Streetsblog USA post from writer Angie Schmitt.

Noting strong opposition to the Eastern Corridor plan from impacted communities such as Newtown, Mariemont and Madisonville, Schmitt asks, "Has Ohio DOT decided to shelve it? Nope. Instead, the Federal Highway Administration recently hired a third-party mediator to reach an agreement between Ohio DOT and the highway opponents. The mediator’s report recommended eight possibilities. One is a 'no-build' option, and the other seven are less harmful variations on the Eastern Corridor idea."

Read the full post here.

Sittenfeld's Senate announcement gets national attention


Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld's announcement that he will run for U.S. Senate in 2016 has started to grab national headlines. Ohio, as usual, will be a pivotal state in the presidential election next year, when Sen. Rob Portman is up for re-election.

Sittenfeld recently told Soapbox he'd been "thinking seriously about that race and have been genuinely overwhelmed at the level of encouragement people have offered."

The Huffington Post has the first national interview with Sittenfeld since his annoucement yesterday, saying, "If elected, Sittenfeld would be one of the youngest members of the chamber, where the U.S. Constitution sets the minimum age for service at 30. He faces an uphill battle against Portman, 59, who already had $5.8 million in his campaign war chest as of early January.

"But Sittenfeld too has been laying groundwork, traveling around the state on what National Journal recently called a 'months-long networking campaign' to introduce himself to activists and voters outside of Cincinnati. He brought on board the high-profile campaign firm 270 Strategies, which boasts several veterans of President Barack Obama's two bids for the White House, to handle his announcement. And his interview Thursday was filled with carefully tailored policy specifics that largely dovetailed with what Obama put forward in his State of the Union address this week."

Read the full Huffington Post story here. There's also coverage in Politico and The New York Times.
 

Cincinnatians among Forbes "30 Under 30" changing the world


Forbes magazine is out with its annual "30 Under 30" list of young folks making a mark and changing the world. This year's list has a total of 600 millennials in 20 different categories (art & style, venture capital, consumer tech, music, etc.) — so 30 people in each.

A number of present and past Cincinnatians have a presence on the lists, many of them running startups developed through The Brandery. Konrad Billetz, CEO of Frameri eyeglass startup in Over-the-Rhine, was named among the leaders in manufacturing & industry, while Mayor John Cranley's director of external affairs, Daniel Rajaiah, made the law & policy list; he heads up Cranley's high-profile Task Force on Immigration. The Business Courier has a roundup of other Cincinnati connections to the lists.

Read the Forbes "30 Under 30" section here.
 

Cincinnati Streetcar part of $90 billion in transit developments across North America


The Cincinnati Streetcar's $148 million price tag is too high for some and not enough of an investment for others, but one thing's for certain: The project has lots of company across North America. The Transport Politic website published its annual rundown of major transit investments in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, saying a total of $90.6 billion will be spent in 2015 on roughly 100 different bus rapid transit, streetcar and light/heavy rail projects. Read more here.

Congress passes bill after Cincinnati push

Cincinnati government affairs guru Chip Gerhardt pushed the U.S. House of Representatives to pass the ABLE (Achieving a Better Life) Act last week, allowing people with disabilities to set up savings accounts with no tax on the earnings, similar to 529 college savings accounts, to cover housing, transportation and other expenses. Speaker of the House John Boehner was an active supporter. The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration. Read about Gerhardt's efforts on behalf of his teenage daughter and thousands of others with disabilities here.

What it takes to build a startup city: Meet 7 mayors promoting entrepreneurship

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, for the first time in history, has included operational support for Cincinnati’s startup ecosystem in the city’s budget. Read more.

Cincinnati Zoo's lioness may be expecting cubs

Does the Cincinnati Zoo's lioness, Imani, have a baby bump? CNN's Jeanne Moos asks is she or isn't she? Not even her zookeepers know for sure. Watch the video.
319 Leadership Articles | Page: | Show All
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