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Leadership : Cincinnati In The News

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Cincinnati has two of the 23 worst traffic bottlenecks in U.S.

The American Transportation Research Institute has collected and processed truck GPS data since 2002 to create performance measures related to truck-based freight transportation, then quantifies the impact of traffic congestion at 250 specific locations. Their latest analysis shows that Cincinnati has two of the nation's 23 worst traffic bottlenecks.

The intersection of I-71 and I-75 at the Brent Spence Bridge downtown is the #7 worst traffic congestion spot in the U.S., ahead of anything in Los Angeles. Don't worry, though, because we're going to get a Brent Spence Bridge replacement very soon.

The I-75/I-74 split is the country's #23 worst traffic congestion spot. That area is actually scheduled to be rebuilt and should be finished in 5-10 years.

But things could always be worse: Houston has four of the top 10 worst traffic bottlenecks.

Read the full American Transportation Research Institute study here.

Did Kentucky governor's race kill political polling?

Politicians like to say that the only poll that matters is on Election Day. That's starting to be more true, according to analysis in Governing Magazine.

Writer Alan Greenblatt points out that polls in the Kentucky governor's race consistently showed Democrat Jack Conway with a slight lead over Republican Matt Bevin. Not only did Bevin win, but it wasn't even close, as he took 53 percent of the vote to Conway's 44 percent.

The day after the election, The Lexington Herald-Leader announced it would dump Survey USA as its pollster.

"We might as well buy monkeys and dartboards vs. what we had here with Survey USA," Greenblatt quotes Kentucky Republican consultant Scott Jennings.

"The problems aren't limited to the Bluegrass State," the article says. "Last year, polls around the country underestimated the Republican strength in several Senate races, as well as the governor's race in Wisconsin. Conversely, in 2012, the Gallup Poll showed Mitt Romney beating Barack Obama in the presidential election."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

UC professors discover possible "gateway to civilizations" in Greece

A grave discovered this spring by Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker, a husband-and-wife team in the University of Cincinnati's Department of Classics, is yielding artifacts that The New York Times says "could be a gateway" to explain the earliest development of Ancient Greek culture.

"Probably not since the 1950s have we found such a rich tomb," James C. Wright, director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, told The Times. "You can count on one hand the number of tombs as wealthy as this one," echoed Thomas M. Brogan, director of the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete.

The article says Davis and Stocker have been excavating near the Greek coastal city of Pylos for 25 years and were surprised to find such an impressive site basically right under their noses.

"It is indeed mind boggling that we were first," Davis wrote in an email to The Times. "I'm still shaking my head in disbelief. So many walked over it so many times, including our own team."

Read the full New York Times story here.

25 years later: Cincinnati and Mapplethorpe

Cincinnati writer/artist Grace Dobush has a well-researched and well-written story in today's Washington Post about this weekend's activity at the Contemporary Arts Center celebrating the 25th anniversary of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe's infamous Perfect Moment exhibition at the CAC. Events and the symposium continue through tomorrow; see the full schedule here.

Dobush does a nice job reminding readers of the local tumult in 1990, centering around the prosecution of the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and their subsequent acquittal by a Hamilton County jury. She also discusses Cincinnati's slow recovery from the culture wars that created an atmosphere where art could be prosecuted as obscenity.

"When Chris Seelbach became Cincinnati’s first openly gay City Council member in 2011 ... Cincinnati’s score on the Human Rights Council’s Municipal Equality Index, which evaluates cities on support for LGBT populations, was 68," Dobush writes. "As of 2014, it was a perfect 100. And Cincinnati son Jim Obergefell was at the center of the landmark Supreme Court decision this year to legalize gay marriage."

Interviews include Seelbach, CAC Director Raphaela Platow, Source Cincinnati's Julie Calvert, former Mercantile Library Director Albert Pyle and Vice Mayor David Mann. Great job, Grace!

Read the full Washington Post story here.

Cincinnati among three new U.S. streetcar lines hitting milestones

Urban issues website Next City discusses Cincinnati's Streetcar's final downtown track section being completed in its weekly "New Starts" roundup of newsworthy public transportation projects worldwide.

Streetcar projects in Cincinnati and Kansas City are moving toward completion, the roundup reports, with both systems awaiting delivery of their first vehicles from CAF's manufacturing plant in Elmira, N.Y. The article also provides an update on the new streetcar line in Washington, D.C., which is currently testing its vehicles and hopes to be fully operational by year end.

Read the full Next City roundup here.

Ohio political parties want to limit their own power in redistricting

Governing Magazine has a good roundup story about Ohio Issue 1, which we'll be voting on in a few weeks. If passed, it would change how Ohio legislators draw state senate and state rep districts every 10 years in accord with the U.S. Census.

"Ohio politicians have long talked about changing the redistricting process, but, if approved, this would be the first major change to it in more than 40 years, according to Brittany Warner, communications director for the Ohio Republican Party," writes Daniel Vock. "The 66 members of the state's Republican central committee 'found the plan to be transparent, accountable and fair, so they endorsed the issue,' she said.

"Democrats are on board, too — although the chair of the state party, David Pepper, said they would prefer an independent redistricting commission like the ones in Arizona and California. But voters soundly defeated a proposal to do that in 2012.

"'If you're going to have it be the politicians doing redistricting, which is less than ideal, I think it provides a structure that pretty creatively incentivizes doing it the right way,' Pepper said."

Pepper also told Vock, "The direct result of gerrymandering is non-stop, very far right, extreme legislating. Hopefully the outcome of fair districts is a much more measured approach by our state legislature."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

Procter & Gamble to run its home care/fabric product factories with wind power

Procter & Gamble officials announced at their annual shareholder meeting that the company is teaming up with EDF Renewable Energy to build a wind farm in Texas to power all of its North American plants that manufacture home care and fabric products. Those facilities make some of the company’s best-known household items, including Tide, Febreze and Mr. Clean.

"It is Procter & Gamble’s biggest foray into wind power, and is the latest in a burst of partnerships between major American corporations and renewable energy companies," writes Rachel Abrams in The New York Times. "The initiative also represents an opportunity for P.&G. to garner good will with environmentally conscious consumers at a time when personal care companies are under more pressure than ever to respond to their concerns."

Shailesh Jejurikar, president of P&G’s North American fabric care division, told The Times, "More and more, we find a very large number — call it two-thirds of consumers — looking to make some kind of contribution in the space, and hopefully not making trade-offs in value or performance."

Read the full New York Times story here.

Cincinnati's embrace of technology continues to draw attention, this time lasers & road repairs

The City of Cincinnati's embrace of technology and big data has exploded since the launch of its Office of Performance and Data Analytics late last year. National tech websites have praised the city for using data analysis to fight blight and to make local government more efficient and transparent.

Now Governing Magazine looks at the city's use of lasers and GPS technology to fix potholes and get ahead on road maintenance.

Michael Moore, director of the city's Transportation and Engineering Department, explains the new approach.

"What's really interesting about this is that there is a GPS component to it," he tells the magazine. "So every bit of data they collect is coded and we can code this back to our local (geographic information system). We then know, pretty much on a granular level, where every pothole is, where we have rutting, where we have a roughness index — all of those things get captured and layered into the GIS system in a way that we don’t do today.”

Moore says the result of the faster, more accurate street survey will be what he calls an interactive "900-mile-long photograph."

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

How Cincinnati fares in analysis of U.S. bike & walk commuting

The League of American Bicyclists recently released its 2014 edition of “Where We Ride: An Analysis of Bicycling in American Cities,” a look at the growth of bicycle commuters based on new data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey. Topics covered include how all 50 states rank according to bicycle commuters as a share of all commuters, how cities with a high percentage of bicycle commuters compare to other cities in their regions and even numbers on the rate of growth among walking commuters.

The broad results show there was a modest increase of 0.5 percent from 2013 to 2014 in the percentage of bike commuters nationwide. That number has grown by 62 percent nationally since 2000.

Cincinnati, Ohio and Kentucky show up throughout the report, of course, with mixed results. The best news: Cincinnati is the third fastest growing city for bike commuting, with 350 percent growth in bike commuters between 2000 and 2014. Only Detroit and Pittsburgh grew faster.

Cincinnati ranks #31 among U.S. cities for percentage of commuter trips taken by bike (0.9 percent), which is about where the city sits in overall market size (#35). Portland, Ore. is #1.

In terms of overall share of commuting performed on bicycle, Ohio ranks 36 and Kentucky 43. Oregon is #1.

Interestingly, 6.4 percent of Cincinnati workers commuted by walking in 2014, which ranks ninth among U.S. cities in the 200,000-500,000 population range. Pittsburgh was first in that size category with 11 percent.

Read the full League of American Bicyclists report here.

When art fought the law in Cincinnati and art won

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Contemporary Arts Center's Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition, The Perfect Moment, that resulted in obscenity charges against the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and ultimately their exoneration by a Hamilton County jury. Smithsonian Magazine does a good job recapping the 1990 events and trying to explain how Cincinnati — the arts community and the city in general — has evolved since then.

Writer Alex Palmer interviews Barrie and his lead defense attorney, Lou Sirkin, to provide memories of the 1990 events as well as current CAC Director Raphaela Platow and Curator Steven Matijcio for "what does it mean today" context.
"The case has left a positive legacy for the CAC, and for Barrie, who went on to help defend offensive song lyrics at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum," Palmer writes. "'People see the CAC as a champion of the arts,' says Matijcio. 'We're still always trying to be challenging and topical, to draw on work that's relevant and of the moment.'"

The CAC commemorates the 25th anniversary with a series of programs and exhibitions, starting with a "Mapplethorpe + 25" symposium Oct. 23-24.

Read the full Smithsonian Magazine story here.

Forbes Travel Guide: "4 reasons Cincinnati is on our radar"

Forbes Travel Guide is bragging on Cincinnati in a blog roll that also features guides to "6 resorts for yoga lovers," "20 trips for the adventure of a lifetime" and "3 hotels that loan out jewels and designer bags."

Titled "4 reasons why Cincinnati is on our radar," the unbylined post starts out, "Winston Churchill said, 'Cincinnati is the most beautiful of the inland cities of the union.' We think he was on to something. Nestled amidst a hilly landscape reminiscent of San Francisco lies a revitalized city that’s buzzing with life and is begging to be explored."

The four reasons we're getting noticed? Up-and-coming food scene, beer and bourbon heritage, an explosion of hipness and easy access to luxurious hotels and high-end experiences.

Read the full Forbes Travel Guide story here.

Considering Ohio's new ethics strategy of publicly shaming politicians

Governing Magazine, which covers politics, policy and management for state and local government leaders, looks at recent actions by State Auditor Dave Yost to shine public attention on unethical behavior by government officials across Ohio.

"When it comes to public ethics, things aren't always black or white," writes Data Editor Mike Maciag in the September issue. "There are plenty of actions that might not be illegal, but nonetheless would be seen by most people as an abuse of power.

"In Ohio, such occurrences ultimately went unflagged in audit reports. But State Auditor Dave Yost wants to change that. In July, he implemented a new policy allowing for findings of 'abuse' that are meant to draw attention to highly questionable behavior by public officials not directly contradicting state rules or laws."

Officials found to have committed abuses won't necessarily face penalties in a courtroom, Yost says, but they'll be subject to the court of public opinion and the possibility of public shaming will act as a deterrent.

Let's hope he's right.

Read the full Governing Magazine story here.

How a fiddler and an astrophysicist introduced predictive analytics to Cincinnati

Backchannel, a tech-focused subsite at Medium.com, is back at it, heaping praise on the city of Cincinnati's efforts to lead the charge toward the future of local government by integrating data into its daily operations. The praise is centered on Ed Cunningham, head of the city's building code enforcement operations who also happens to be front man and fiddle player for Comet Bluegrass All-Stars.

Back in April, Backchannel writer Susan Crawford used glowing terms to describe how City Manager Harry Black and Chief Performance Officer Chad Kenney built the city's Office of Performance and Data Analytics. With this new story she revisits Cincinnati's newfound fascination with data, focusing on Cunningham's experiments with Predictive Blight Prevention.

"Even if you aren’t immediately eager to read another column about Cincinnati, keep going," Crawford writes. "Like other good stories, this one has drama, memorable characters, sudden bursts of insight, and a cliffhanger ending that hints at future episodes. It also has a soundtrack."

Read the full Backchannel article here.

New York Times tracks split over Boehner's resignation to Cincinnati area

In the wake of U.S. House Speaker John Boehner's resignation last week, The New York Times interviews a variety of Southwest Ohio residents in his district and finds a mix of opinion. The headline says it all: "Reactions on Boehner's Home Turf Reflect Divisions in G.O.P."

Reporter Julie Bosman visited Andy's Cafe, the Carthage spot once owned by Boehner's father, and various West Chester locations to solicit opinions.

Read the full New York Times story here.

Wired likes local project's use of video games to fight urban decay

Wired magazine took notice of local designer Giacomo Ciminello's use of video game play to help re-invigorate blighted spaces through his People’s Liberty grant project, Spaced Invaders. Soapbox was on hand Aug. 27 for the project's first public display in Walnut Hills.

"I like the idea of just 'spaced invaders' because that is literally what we are doing," Ciminello tells Wired. "We aren't destroying property, we aren't making permanent marks. We are having fun, and opening up people's eyes to possibility. Why is this parking lot here? Empty? … What does this neighborhood or community need and can it be in this space? That's the kind of dialogue we are hoping for."

Read the full Wired story here.
380 Leadership Articles | Page: | Show All
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