| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

Arts + Culture : Cincinnati In The News

297 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 

Cincinnatians featured by Forbes among top "change agents" under age 30


Forbes has released its annual "30 Under 30" list of the 600 brightest young entrepreneurs, breakout talents and change agents in 20 different sectors, from art & style to venture capital to healthcare. A lot of famous faces are included: basketball star Steph Curry, Star Wars actor John Boyega and model Ashley Graham are featured prominently at the top of the home page.

A handful of Cincinnatians made the list, according to Erin Caproni at Cincinnati Business Courier, who studied all 600 names so we don't have to. Two of Mortar's co-founders, Derrick Braziel and William Thomas II, were featured in the Social Entrepreneurs section, while the four Cincinnati natives in Walk the Moon were featured in the Music section.

Last year's "30 Under 30" list included Konrad Billetz, CEO of the Frameri eyeware startup.

Read the full Forbes list here.
 

Cincinnati's historic neighborhoods are well worth visiting


Sometimes, says a travel article in the Lexington Herald-Leader, we’re just in the mood for a nice getaway — one that doesn’t take too much advance planning and doesn’t put a substantial dent in the bank balance. Writer Patti Nickell suggests that Cincinnati — just a little more than an hour’s drive from Lexington, Ky. — offers great value for a reasonable price.

Nickell runs down a full list of name-brand attractions in Greater Cincinnati (Kings Island, Bengals games, Cincinnati Symphony, Museum Center at Union Terminal, etc.) but says the best surprises to be found here are in the historic neighborhoods. She spends a day each in her two favorites, Mt. Adams and Covington's MainStrasse.

Read the full Lexington Herald-Leader story here.
 

Fountain Square Christkindlmarkt among top 10 German-style Christmas markets in U.S.


USA Today recently published a roundup of popular Christmas markets in Germany, accompanied by a slideshow of the 10 best German-style holiday markets in the U.S., including the Cincideutsch market on Fountain Square.

"The Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt brings European holiday traditions to Cincinnati, an Ohio River city with a deep German heritage and a huge Oktoberfest," the slideshow says in describing the downtown weekend market.

The fourth annual Christkindlmarkt is run by Cincideutsch, a group of German-speaking residents in Cincinnati who enjoy celebrating their German heritage. The market vendors offer a variety of traditional holiday sweets and European baked goods, Glühwein (hot spiced wine) and other hot beverages, Christian Moerlein beer and handcrafted gifts and seasonal decorations. It's open 4-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 20.

See the full USA Today top 10 list here.
 

Good times in Cincinnati, A (art) to Z (Zula)


Andrew Davis, managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times, a newspaper and website serving the LGBTQ community, visited Cincinnati recently as part of its TRAVEL series and came away impressed.

"When I told several people I'd be headed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and neighboring northern Kentucky," Davis wrote in the opening to his report, "I pretty much received a collective shrug as well as comments like, 'You'll probably run out of things to do within a day.' Well, I'm here to tell people near and far that Cincinnati and Kentucky have a LOT to offer — primarily with (courtesy of revitalization) some pretty unique spots that make the area memorable."

Davis' whirlwind visit included Over-the-Rhine, Covington's MainStrasse district ("reminded me of Evanston"), Clifton and Northside ("full of treasures of all types").

Read the full story from Windy City Times here.
 

Jens Lekman making music more personal and intimate from Cincinnati


Jens Lekman is one of Sweden's best-known musicians and a darling of the indie pop world, writes Stephen Heyman in The New York Times. He has three full-length albums to his name, including 2007's Night Falls Over Kortedala, which made it onto several critics' lists of the last decade's best records.

Heyman runs a Q&A in the Times's International Arts section to explore Lekman's recent push into more intimate and immediate ways of music-making and explains how he was in Cincinnati this fall working on a project called "Ghostwriting" in which he interviewed people about their lives and turned their stories into songs he later released for free on his website.

Lekman performed a few weeks ago at the Woodward Theater in a collaboration with MYCincinnati Youth Orchestra.

Read the full New York Times Q&A here.
 

Cincinnati among top 20 U.S. cities for freelance graphic designers


The Graphic Design USA website is citing Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers to say there are 259,500 graphic designers in the U.S., with 24 percent self-employed. It then looks at a study by Zen99, a tax company for self-employed workers, to compare which cities provide "the biggest bang for the buck" for self-employed or freelance graphic designers.

Cincinnati is ranked #18 in the study, which explores where graphic designers earn the most, which cities have the highest percentage of self-employed designers and how affordable are living costs, especially health insurance.

The top five cities are Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; and Miami.

Read the full Graphic Design USA post here.
 

ArtWorks murals tell Cincinnati's story "one wall at a time"


The Cleveland Plain Dealer takes a tour of ArtWorks' mural program and comes away impressed.

"To learn the history of Cincinnati, take a walk. Then look around," Susan Glaser writes. "The city's story surrounds you, in full color, on the exteriors of buildings scattered throughout downtown and in dozens of nearby neighborhoods."

Glaser and a Plain Dealer photographer check out some of the Cincinnati's newest and best-known murals, including Ezzard Charles and Henry Holtgrewe, the world's strongest man, in Over-the-Rhine; the fruit stand beside Kroger's headquarters; and the retouched Cincinnatus homage at Vine Street and Central Parkway.

"Every day, thousands of residents and visitors pass by the murals," Galser writes, "and, perhaps, wonder: What is that? How did it get there?"

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.
 

Cincinnati recommended for "weekend getaway" from Chicago


Inside Hook bills itself as "the essential city guide email for adventurous and established men — guys who have limited time, but discerning taste and a thirst for experiences." It focuses on Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, and that's where Cincinnati comes in.

In its 4hr. Rule section, the Chicago site offers a guide to Cincinnati as one of "the best destinations that are far away, yet still close to home. ... Stipulated: the perfect travel time for a three-day weekend getaway is four hours."

Inside Hook calls Cincinnati "one of the surprising destinations on the mid-sized-American-city travel circuit ... a city built on Midwestern spirit (and immigrant German muscle) with a slight dose of Southern charm."

Guide highlights include 21c Museum Hotel, Salazar, Eden Park, Rhinegeist, Article Menswear and Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar.

Read the full Inside Hook post here.
 

UC professors discover possible "gateway to civilizations" in Greece


A grave discovered this spring by Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker, a husband-and-wife team in the University of Cincinnati's Department of Classics, is yielding artifacts that The New York Times says "could be a gateway" to explain the earliest development of Ancient Greek culture.

"Probably not since the 1950s have we found such a rich tomb," James C. Wright, director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, told The Times. "You can count on one hand the number of tombs as wealthy as this one," echoed Thomas M. Brogan, director of the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete.

The article says Davis and Stocker have been excavating near the Greek coastal city of Pylos for 25 years and were surprised to find such an impressive site basically right under their noses.

"It is indeed mind boggling that we were first," Davis wrote in an email to The Times. "I'm still shaking my head in disbelief. So many walked over it so many times, including our own team."

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

25 years later: Cincinnati and Mapplethorpe


Cincinnati writer/artist Grace Dobush has a well-researched and well-written story in today's Washington Post about this weekend's activity at the Contemporary Arts Center celebrating the 25th anniversary of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe's infamous Perfect Moment exhibition at the CAC. Events and the symposium continue through tomorrow; see the full schedule here.

Dobush does a nice job reminding readers of the local tumult in 1990, centering around the prosecution of the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and their subsequent acquittal by a Hamilton County jury. She also discusses Cincinnati's slow recovery from the culture wars that created an atmosphere where art could be prosecuted as obscenity.

"When Chris Seelbach became Cincinnati’s first openly gay City Council member in 2011 ... Cincinnati’s score on the Human Rights Council’s Municipal Equality Index, which evaluates cities on support for LGBT populations, was 68," Dobush writes. "As of 2014, it was a perfect 100. And Cincinnati son Jim Obergefell was at the center of the landmark Supreme Court decision this year to legalize gay marriage."

Interviews include Seelbach, CAC Director Raphaela Platow, Source Cincinnati's Julie Calvert, former Mercantile Library Director Albert Pyle and Vice Mayor David Mann. Great job, Grace!

Read the full Washington Post story here.
 

When art fought the law in Cincinnati and art won


This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Contemporary Arts Center's Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition, The Perfect Moment, that resulted in obscenity charges against the CAC and its director, Dennis Barrie, and ultimately their exoneration by a Hamilton County jury. Smithsonian Magazine does a good job recapping the 1990 events and trying to explain how Cincinnati — the arts community and the city in general — has evolved since then.

Writer Alex Palmer interviews Barrie and his lead defense attorney, Lou Sirkin, to provide memories of the 1990 events as well as current CAC Director Raphaela Platow and Curator Steven Matijcio for "what does it mean today" context.
 
"The case has left a positive legacy for the CAC, and for Barrie, who went on to help defend offensive song lyrics at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum," Palmer writes. "'People see the CAC as a champion of the arts,' says Matijcio. 'We're still always trying to be challenging and topical, to draw on work that's relevant and of the moment.'"

The CAC commemorates the 25th anniversary with a series of programs and exhibitions, starting with a "Mapplethorpe + 25" symposium Oct. 23-24.

Read the full Smithsonian Magazine story here.
 

Forbes Travel Guide: "4 reasons Cincinnati is on our radar"


Forbes Travel Guide is bragging on Cincinnati in a blog roll that also features guides to "6 resorts for yoga lovers," "20 trips for the adventure of a lifetime" and "3 hotels that loan out jewels and designer bags."

Titled "4 reasons why Cincinnati is on our radar," the unbylined post starts out, "Winston Churchill said, 'Cincinnati is the most beautiful of the inland cities of the union.' We think he was on to something. Nestled amidst a hilly landscape reminiscent of San Francisco lies a revitalized city that’s buzzing with life and is begging to be explored."

The four reasons we're getting noticed? Up-and-coming food scene, beer and bourbon heritage, an explosion of hipness and easy access to luxurious hotels and high-end experiences.

Read the full Forbes Travel Guide story here.
 

Wired likes local project's use of video games to fight urban decay


Wired magazine took notice of local designer Giacomo Ciminello's use of video game play to help re-invigorate blighted spaces through his People’s Liberty grant project, Spaced Invaders. Soapbox was on hand Aug. 27 for the project's first public display in Walnut Hills.

"I like the idea of just 'spaced invaders' because that is literally what we are doing," Ciminello tells Wired. "We aren't destroying property, we aren't making permanent marks. We are having fun, and opening up people's eyes to possibility. Why is this parking lot here? Empty? … What does this neighborhood or community need and can it be in this space? That's the kind of dialogue we are hoping for."

Read the full Wired story here.
 

How Hamilton produced "drill rap" star Slim Jesus


Apparently Hamilton is home to an up-and-coming rap star who goes by the name Slim Jesus. The Atlantic's CityLab attempts to find out why a white rapper from small-town Ohio has a video with more than 1.5 million YouTube views (image from the video is above) and close to 16,500 "thumbs-up" as well as more than 7,000 "thumbs-down."

"His song 'Drill Time' has launched him into overnight celebrity status, in no small part to his gunshow spectacle, but also because of the power of social media," Brentin Mock writes. "There are plenty of blogs, listicles, and Reddit threads attempting to explain who Slim Jesus is. However, his hometown of Hamilton — the city where (President George W.) Bush dropped bombs on education and Iraq in the same speech (in 2002) — perhaps most deserves examination to understand how Slim Jesus came to be."

Among "the conditions that created Slim Jesus," Mock focuses on Ohio's vanishing manufacturing sector, which hit Hamilton especially hard, and the state's steady pro-firearms legislative march.

"While gun violence is often associated with black teens, it's not surprising to find such a huge arsenal of guns in the hands of the white, teenaged rapper," he writes. "He's a reflection of his city — which is 84 percent white and 22.9 percent poor — and a reflection of the values of the predominantly white National Rifle Association. Along with Slim Jesus, Ohio also produced Machine Gun Kelly, from Cleveland, a Rust Belt city that has recovered a bit better than Hamilton but is still in an economic rut."

Read the full CityLab story here.
 
297 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts