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Architecture : Cincinnati In The News

93 Architecture Articles | Page: | Show All

ArtWorks murals tell Cincinnati's story "one wall at a time"

The Cleveland Plain Dealer takes a tour of ArtWorks' mural program and comes away impressed.

"To learn the history of Cincinnati, take a walk. Then look around," Susan Glaser writes. "The city's story surrounds you, in full color, on the exteriors of buildings scattered throughout downtown and in dozens of nearby neighborhoods."

Glaser and a Plain Dealer photographer check out some of the Cincinnati's newest and best-known murals, including Ezzard Charles and Henry Holtgrewe, the world's strongest man, in Over-the-Rhine; the fruit stand beside Kroger's headquarters; and the retouched Cincinnatus homage at Vine Street and Central Parkway.

"Every day, thousands of residents and visitors pass by the murals," Galser writes, "and, perhaps, wonder: What is that? How did it get there?"

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.

Forbes Travel Guide: "4 reasons Cincinnati is on our radar"

Forbes Travel Guide is bragging on Cincinnati in a blog roll that also features guides to "6 resorts for yoga lovers," "20 trips for the adventure of a lifetime" and "3 hotels that loan out jewels and designer bags."

Titled "4 reasons why Cincinnati is on our radar," the unbylined post starts out, "Winston Churchill said, 'Cincinnati is the most beautiful of the inland cities of the union.' We think he was on to something. Nestled amidst a hilly landscape reminiscent of San Francisco lies a revitalized city that’s buzzing with life and is begging to be explored."

The four reasons we're getting noticed? Up-and-coming food scene, beer and bourbon heritage, an explosion of hipness and easy access to luxurious hotels and high-end experiences.

Read the full Forbes Travel Guide story here.

New York Times celebrates "Cincinnati Starchitecture" on UC campus

This week's New York Times Magazine presents "The Education Issue," a collection of thought-provoking stories with headlines like "A Prescription for More Black Doctors," "Why We Should Fear University, Inc." and "What Is the Point of College?" The online headline that caught our attention, though, was for a slideshow called "Cincinnati Starchitecture."

The University of Cincinnati campus is featured in 14 very nice photos as a playground for renowned architects, from the recently unveiled renovation of Nippert Stadium to various academic, recreation and dorm buildings. It's an amazing tribute to the school on a very high-profile web site.

See the New York Times slideshow here.

UPDATE: The Times has added an accompanying feature story to the slideshow, "If You Build It, They Will Come ... Won't They?" The story describes how UC is trying to raise its profile through a risky (but increasingly common) investment: expensive architecture.

"The university now has $1.1 billion in debt — close to 20 percent more than it had in 2004 — largely because of its construction boom," the story says. "During the same time, enrollment has increased by nearly 30 percent. The spending is predicated on the idea that new buildings can help turn provincial universities into outre, worldly 'academical villages.' It's a financial gamble — one that many public institutions find themselves driven to make."

All signs point to Cincinnati

American Sign Museum was featured in a travel story in yesterday's Sunday Philadelphia Inquirer, the second time this year the funky Camp Washington museum has received national media coverage.

"For a guy who has spent his life around signs, Tod Swormstedt sure has a difficult name to fit on one," the article says in introducing the local icon. "He's the founder of the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, a celebration of the art of signage, from painted wooden panels to wildly lighted neon extravaganzas."

Writers Larissa and Michael Milne get in the requisite mention of Cincinnati chili at the end, pointing readers/visitors to nearby Camp Washington Chili.

Read the full Philadelphia Inquirer story here.

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy

Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.

MLB.com highlights Cincinnati's attractions for All Star Game visitors

Now come the national media stories highlighting Cincinnati's restaurants, bars, arts & culture, museums and general urban renaissance to provide All Star Game visitors with a well-rounded picture of what to expect during their time here. Leading off is Major League Baseball itself, going for a home run overview of Cincinnati attractions along with Skyline, Graeter's and Montgomery Inn ribs.

"Seemingly in a renaissance for progress and development, it feels like the perfect summer for Cincinnati to be hosting the All-Star Game presented by T-Mobile," the MLB.com article opens. "A lot has changed since 1988, when the city last hosted the Midsummer Classic. Cincinnati was known then (and now) for being a baseball town with its own unique style of chili. Today, it has a chance to be recognized for much more."

Read the full MLB.com article here.

Union Terminal the most beautiful place in Ohio

Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published a list of the most beautiful places in all 50 states, and their choice for Ohio is Union Terminal, home of the Cincinnati Museum Center. It's one of only two buildings highlighted across the U.S., with most of the beauty spots being parks, lakes, mountains, beaches and other natural wonders.

Calling Union Terminal "the greatest cultural advance Cincinnati has given the world since the Ickey Shuffle," Thrillist likes the combination of multiple museums featuring "large-scale models of the city and replicas of ancient caves that you can actually walk through" and "Gilded Age architecture that denotes an old-school rail station."

Read the full Thrillist story and list here.

Beer and baseball traditions make Cincinnati a "fun Midwest destination"

The New York Daily News has a new travel piece focusing on Cincinnati's beer brewing and baseball traditions, mixed with first-person impressions of riverfront development on both sides of the Ohio, downtown hotel and restaurant options and the renaissance in Over-the-Rhine.

"To a degree Cincinnati can't help but channel its past," J.P. Hoornstra writes. "The centralized downtown neighborhood known as Over-the-Rhine claims to be the largest urban historic district in the country, densely packed with 19th-century brick buildings built in the Italianate style. The neighborhood shows its age but is also increasingly livable, walkable and shop-able.

"Shopping in historic buildings is fun, but not always the substance of a vacation. What sets Cincinnati apart is how it's rallied around its baseball, beer and old buildings, creating a unique urban Midwest destination."

Read the full New York Daily News story here.

WVXU's Cincinnati Edition discusses church buildings coming back to life

WVXU's "Cincinnati Edition" show did a segment June 2 about abandoned local church buildings coming back to life, the subject of a recent Soapbox feature story by Rick Pender. Host Mark Heyne interviewed Pender, Cincinnati Preservation Association Executive Director Paul Muller and Kevin Moreland, head brewer and partner at Taft's Ale House, a focal point of Pender's story.

Listen to the full "Cincinnati Edition" segment here.

Tolls on the rise as highway funding dries up

With shortfalls in federal transportation spending and the Highway Trust Fund, the Brookings Institution's Robert Puentes says that states and localities are exploring more tolls to support new capacity and other ongoing improvements.

"In 2013, for instance, tolls covered about 5,400 miles across all interstate and non-interstate roadways nationally, a 15.1 percent jump since 2003," he writes. "Toll roads have expanded their mileage by nearly 350 miles, or 7 percent, since 2011 alone. By comparison, total system mileage has grown by only 3.6 percent over the past decade."

Which leads us, as always, to stalled discussions over replacing the Brent Spence Bridge — where tolls seem to be an inevitability except to the Kentucky legislators who control the project.

Cincinnati Magazine partnered with UC's Niehoff Urban Studio recently to look at the future of transportation, including an interesting option to build the new highway bridge west of Longworth Hall (see rendering above).

Read the full Brookings article here.

OTR named a "hidden food and drink gem"

The Daily Meal online food and dining website has a travel story about Over-the-Rhine as a "hidden food and drink gem."

"When it comes to great comeback stories, few places can top Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine neighborhood," says writer Teresa Tobat. "The area was once dubbed 'one of the nation’s most dangerous neighborhoods in the country' and has since been revitalized. And the food scene of Cincinnati's oldest neighborhood — the streets resemble a 1960s New York City — is surprisingly happening."

According to its website, The Daily Meal's "passionate team canvasses the world to bring you the best food and drink experiences at all levels, around the table, at home or on the road. Harvesting the delicious and discarding the mundane, we are your friend on the inside, discovering and reporting with a sense of fun and curiosity."

Read the full article here.

Video tour of American Sign Museum

The Huffington Post regularly features travel pieces from Cincinnati's own Roadtrippers offering to take readers "on the road for the trip of a lifetime." The most recent story is a video tour of the American Sign Museum in Camp Washington.

See the full overview and tour here.

OTR included in "Best Architecture in the Midwest"

A photo slideshow titled "Seeking Frank Lloyd Wright: Best Architecture in the Midwest" includes Over-the-Rhine, which Conde Nast Traveler describes as "a case study in successful urban renewal, thanks in part to its notable architecture." The writer also gives a shout-out to the University of Cincinnati's student recreation center, designed by California-based architecture firm Morphosis. See the slide show here.

The real-life inspiration for the Super Friends' Hall of Justice is in danger

When the Super Friends of the classic 1970s cartoon series gather at the Hall of Justice, Cincinnatians find it eerily familiar—after all, the hideout drew inspiration from the Queen City’s Union Terminal. But now the art deco masterpiece is in need of some super friends itself. Read more.

General Electric's Generic Building

Will money trump quality in the review of the proposed GE office building in Cincinnati? Read what Architect Magazine has to say.
93 Architecture Articles | Page: | Show All
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