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Architecture : Cincinnati In The News

98 Architecture Articles | Page: | Show All

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center gets attention in Virgin Atlantic blog


Local arts aficionado Margy Waller continues to spread the gospel of Cincinnati's renaissance worldwide, thanks to her latest feature story on Virgin Atlantic's "Our Places" blog. She focuses here on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which she says "attracts visitors from all over the world with its celebration of freedom in a stunning space and the sharing of the important stories of the Underground Railroad, right from the banks of the river that was the critical crossing point."

Waller describes Cincinnati as "the place to come for history and architecture of the 19th century," the most important inland city at one point in the U.S. that attracted "the big names of the era came to town to try out their great ideas." John Roebling was one such big name, whose innovative bridge — a model for his better-known Brooklyn Bridge —  leads right to the museum's front door.

The story isn't stuck entirely in the past, though, reminding readers of current nearby attractions like the Reds at Great American Ball Park and Moerlein Lager House and new city-on-the-move amenities like Red Bike and the Cincinnati Streetcar.

Why is Virgin Atlantic sharing news and information about Cincinnati, a city the British airline doesn't fly to? "Connecting you to numerous destinations across the United States and Canada," the website says, "our partnership with Delta makes booking a trip to Cincinnati simple."

Read the full Our Places blog post here.
 

Cincinnati's historic neighborhoods are well worth visiting


Sometimes, says a travel article in the Lexington Herald-Leader, we’re just in the mood for a nice getaway — one that doesn’t take too much advance planning and doesn’t put a substantial dent in the bank balance. Writer Patti Nickell suggests that Cincinnati — just a little more than an hour’s drive from Lexington, Ky. — offers great value for a reasonable price.

Nickell runs down a full list of name-brand attractions in Greater Cincinnati (Kings Island, Bengals games, Cincinnati Symphony, Museum Center at Union Terminal, etc.) but says the best surprises to be found here are in the historic neighborhoods. She spends a day each in her two favorites, Mt. Adams and Covington's MainStrasse.

Read the full Lexington Herald-Leader story here.
 

Stop letting starchitects ruin college campuses, including UC, says Project for Public Spaces


The University of Cincinnati received national attention from The New York Times in September for its focus on "starchitecture" in building new facilities on campus — a series of striking structures designed by high-profile architects. The new buildings have helped raise UC's national profile but contribute greatly to its $1.1 billion debt load; still, enrollment has increased by nearly 30 percent over the past 10 years.

The Project for Public Spaces has published an opinion piece that says such "build it and they will come" approaches are ruining college campuses. The nonprofit planning, design and educational organization describes itself as "dedicated to helping people create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communities."

College tuition has been on the rise for 40 years, the article says, but rather than cutting costs colleges are spending more and more money on their exterior aesthetics.

"One of the boldest examples comes from the University of Cincinnati, which has enlisted a 'murderers' row' of architects to redesign their campus, including Frank Gehry, Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Bernard Tschumi, and Thom Mayne," Project for Public Spaces says. "This adds up to a lot of shiny new buildings, including the crown jewel — Mr. Mayne’s exorbitant $112.9 million Campus Recreation Center, which opened in 2006. But there’s even more in the works: UC's Department of Athletics has requested a $70 million renovation of the basketball arena, which, if approved, will open in 2017."

The article then points out that academic spending per full-time undergraduate student at UC dropped 24 percent between 2005 and 2013 "while its professors earn salaries that rank far below those at similar research institutions."

Read the full Project for Public Spaces story here.
 

Can Cincinnati learn from these "top 10 urban innovations"?


Now that Cincinnati is testing its first streetcars and enjoys a variety of craft beer microbreweries, we can safely cross "Become a city of the future" off our civic to-do list.

But wait, what about 10 or 15 years from now when this "future" stuff will be boring and stupid? What are cities of the future planning for the next round of futuristic city living?

The Urban Edge — a blog from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University — provides a peek at the top 10 urban innovations happening around the world right now, according to a new World Economic Forum report.

"In its report, WEF seeks to answer the simple question: what will the cities of tomorrow be like? It highlights 10 innovations happening right now that may offer clues," says the intro to a Dec. 2 blog post.

The top 10 list includes digitally re-programmable space, an internet of freshwater pipes, adopting trees through social media, augmented humanity, unleashing share capacity and five others. Who wants to bet which one makes it to Cincinnati first?

Read the full Urban Edge blog post here.
 

Good times in Cincinnati, A (art) to Z (Zula)


Andrew Davis, managing editor of Chicago's Windy City Times, a newspaper and website serving the LGBTQ community, visited Cincinnati recently as part of its TRAVEL series and came away impressed.

"When I told several people I'd be headed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and neighboring northern Kentucky," Davis wrote in the opening to his report, "I pretty much received a collective shrug as well as comments like, 'You'll probably run out of things to do within a day.' Well, I'm here to tell people near and far that Cincinnati and Kentucky have a LOT to offer — primarily with (courtesy of revitalization) some pretty unique spots that make the area memorable."

Davis' whirlwind visit included Over-the-Rhine, Covington's MainStrasse district ("reminded me of Evanston"), Clifton and Northside ("full of treasures of all types").

Read the full story from Windy City Times here.
 

ArtWorks murals tell Cincinnati's story "one wall at a time"


The Cleveland Plain Dealer takes a tour of ArtWorks' mural program and comes away impressed.

"To learn the history of Cincinnati, take a walk. Then look around," Susan Glaser writes. "The city's story surrounds you, in full color, on the exteriors of buildings scattered throughout downtown and in dozens of nearby neighborhoods."

Glaser and a Plain Dealer photographer check out some of the Cincinnati's newest and best-known murals, including Ezzard Charles and Henry Holtgrewe, the world's strongest man, in Over-the-Rhine; the fruit stand beside Kroger's headquarters; and the retouched Cincinnatus homage at Vine Street and Central Parkway.

"Every day, thousands of residents and visitors pass by the murals," Galser writes, "and, perhaps, wonder: What is that? How did it get there?"

Read the full Cleveland Plain Dealer story here.
 

Forbes Travel Guide: "4 reasons Cincinnati is on our radar"


Forbes Travel Guide is bragging on Cincinnati in a blog roll that also features guides to "6 resorts for yoga lovers," "20 trips for the adventure of a lifetime" and "3 hotels that loan out jewels and designer bags."

Titled "4 reasons why Cincinnati is on our radar," the unbylined post starts out, "Winston Churchill said, 'Cincinnati is the most beautiful of the inland cities of the union.' We think he was on to something. Nestled amidst a hilly landscape reminiscent of San Francisco lies a revitalized city that’s buzzing with life and is begging to be explored."

The four reasons we're getting noticed? Up-and-coming food scene, beer and bourbon heritage, an explosion of hipness and easy access to luxurious hotels and high-end experiences.

Read the full Forbes Travel Guide story here.
 

New York Times celebrates "Cincinnati Starchitecture" on UC campus


This week's New York Times Magazine presents "The Education Issue," a collection of thought-provoking stories with headlines like "A Prescription for More Black Doctors," "Why We Should Fear University, Inc." and "What Is the Point of College?" The online headline that caught our attention, though, was for a slideshow called "Cincinnati Starchitecture."

The University of Cincinnati campus is featured in 14 very nice photos as a playground for renowned architects, from the recently unveiled renovation of Nippert Stadium to various academic, recreation and dorm buildings. It's an amazing tribute to the school on a very high-profile web site.

See the New York Times slideshow here.

UPDATE: The Times has added an accompanying feature story to the slideshow, "If You Build It, They Will Come ... Won't They?" The story describes how UC is trying to raise its profile through a risky (but increasingly common) investment: expensive architecture.

"The university now has $1.1 billion in debt — close to 20 percent more than it had in 2004 — largely because of its construction boom," the story says. "During the same time, enrollment has increased by nearly 30 percent. The spending is predicated on the idea that new buildings can help turn provincial universities into outre, worldly 'academical villages.' It's a financial gamble — one that many public institutions find themselves driven to make."
 

All signs point to Cincinnati


American Sign Museum was featured in a travel story in yesterday's Sunday Philadelphia Inquirer, the second time this year the funky Camp Washington museum has received national media coverage.

"For a guy who has spent his life around signs, Tod Swormstedt sure has a difficult name to fit on one," the article says in introducing the local icon. "He's the founder of the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, a celebration of the art of signage, from painted wooden panels to wildly lighted neon extravaganzas."

Writers Larissa and Michael Milne get in the requisite mention of Cincinnati chili at the end, pointing readers/visitors to nearby Camp Washington Chili.

Read the full Philadelphia Inquirer story here.
 

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy


Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.
 

MLB.com highlights Cincinnati's attractions for All Star Game visitors


Now come the national media stories highlighting Cincinnati's restaurants, bars, arts & culture, museums and general urban renaissance to provide All Star Game visitors with a well-rounded picture of what to expect during their time here. Leading off is Major League Baseball itself, going for a home run overview of Cincinnati attractions along with Skyline, Graeter's and Montgomery Inn ribs.

"Seemingly in a renaissance for progress and development, it feels like the perfect summer for Cincinnati to be hosting the All-Star Game presented by T-Mobile," the MLB.com article opens. "A lot has changed since 1988, when the city last hosted the Midsummer Classic. Cincinnati was known then (and now) for being a baseball town with its own unique style of chili. Today, it has a chance to be recognized for much more."

Read the full MLB.com article here.
 

Union Terminal the most beautiful place in Ohio


Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published a list of the most beautiful places in all 50 states, and their choice for Ohio is Union Terminal, home of the Cincinnati Museum Center. It's one of only two buildings highlighted across the U.S., with most of the beauty spots being parks, lakes, mountains, beaches and other natural wonders.

Calling Union Terminal "the greatest cultural advance Cincinnati has given the world since the Ickey Shuffle," Thrillist likes the combination of multiple museums featuring "large-scale models of the city and replicas of ancient caves that you can actually walk through" and "Gilded Age architecture that denotes an old-school rail station."

Read the full Thrillist story and list here.
 

Beer and baseball traditions make Cincinnati a "fun Midwest destination"


The New York Daily News has a new travel piece focusing on Cincinnati's beer brewing and baseball traditions, mixed with first-person impressions of riverfront development on both sides of the Ohio, downtown hotel and restaurant options and the renaissance in Over-the-Rhine.

"To a degree Cincinnati can't help but channel its past," J.P. Hoornstra writes. "The centralized downtown neighborhood known as Over-the-Rhine claims to be the largest urban historic district in the country, densely packed with 19th-century brick buildings built in the Italianate style. The neighborhood shows its age but is also increasingly livable, walkable and shop-able.

"Shopping in historic buildings is fun, but not always the substance of a vacation. What sets Cincinnati apart is how it's rallied around its baseball, beer and old buildings, creating a unique urban Midwest destination."

Read the full New York Daily News story here.
 

WVXU's Cincinnati Edition discusses church buildings coming back to life


WVXU's "Cincinnati Edition" show did a segment June 2 about abandoned local church buildings coming back to life, the subject of a recent Soapbox feature story by Rick Pender. Host Mark Heyne interviewed Pender, Cincinnati Preservation Association Executive Director Paul Muller and Kevin Moreland, head brewer and partner at Taft's Ale House, a focal point of Pender's story.

Listen to the full "Cincinnati Edition" segment here.
 

Tolls on the rise as highway funding dries up


With shortfalls in federal transportation spending and the Highway Trust Fund, the Brookings Institution's Robert Puentes says that states and localities are exploring more tolls to support new capacity and other ongoing improvements.

"In 2013, for instance, tolls covered about 5,400 miles across all interstate and non-interstate roadways nationally, a 15.1 percent jump since 2003," he writes. "Toll roads have expanded their mileage by nearly 350 miles, or 7 percent, since 2011 alone. By comparison, total system mileage has grown by only 3.6 percent over the past decade."

Which leads us, as always, to stalled discussions over replacing the Brent Spence Bridge — where tolls seem to be an inevitability except to the Kentucky legislators who control the project.

Cincinnati Magazine partnered with UC's Niehoff Urban Studio recently to look at the future of transportation, including an interesting option to build the new highway bridge west of Longworth Hall (see rendering above).

Read the full Brookings article here.
 
98 Architecture Articles | Page: | Show All
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