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Jobs : Cincinnati In The News

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OTR named a "hidden food and drink gem"


The Daily Meal online food and dining website has a travel story about Over-the-Rhine as a "hidden food and drink gem."

"When it comes to great comeback stories, few places can top Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine neighborhood," says writer Teresa Tobat. "The area was once dubbed 'one of the nation’s most dangerous neighborhoods in the country' and has since been revitalized. And the food scene of Cincinnati's oldest neighborhood — the streets resemble a 1960s New York City — is surprisingly happening."

According to its website, The Daily Meal's "passionate team canvasses the world to bring you the best food and drink experiences at all levels, around the table, at home or on the road. Harvesting the delicious and discarding the mundane, we are your friend on the inside, discovering and reporting with a sense of fun and curiosity."

Read the full article here.
 

New York Times: "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives"


The Feb. 25 issue of The New York Times carries a glowing report, "Downtown Cincinnati Thrives as Riots' Memories Recede," in its real estate section. Read the full article online here.

Times writer Keith Schneider focuses on the high-profile downtown development projects we're familiar with — General Electric's new operations center on The Banks, Dunnhumby's new headquarters building at Fifth and Race, 3CDC's work at Fountain Square and in Over-the-Rhine — to describe Cincinnati as coming a long way since the 2001 riots. Nice photos by Mark Lyons, too.


 

Kansas City pulls together bistate transit authority to drive economic development


The former mayor of Kansas City, Kan., has been named to the newly created position of Kansas City Area Transportation Authority CEO, with a mandate to pull together four different bus systems in the region (across two states) and connect them seamlessly with the city's under-construction downtown streetcar line. So reports The Kansas City Star — the kind of story you likely won't be reading any time soon in the Cincinnati media.

The Transportation Authority board was looking for someone with the leadership and public relations skills to build consensus for an improved transportation system that, the article claims, "many say is underfunded, struggles in a car-centric city, and suffers from service gaps that make it challenging for suburban riders to use anytime but during the morning and afternoon rush hours."

"(Joe) Reardon’s job will be to expand and unify the region’s fractured public transit system at a time when transit is seen as a key driver of economic development," the article says, then quotes Reardon: "I think a unified transit system is a key component to moving Kansas City as a region forward."

Good thing we're OK with the status quo of Cincinnati's multiple, unconnected transit systems. The region's just fine as is, thank you.

Read the full story here.
 

Choremonster, Lisnr make list of Upstart 100 driving the "new economy"


The CEOs of two Cincinnati startups — Chris Bergman of Choremoster and Rodney Williams of Lisnr — are featured in Upstart 100, a list of "the inventors, visionaries, masters and more driving the new economy" as proclaimed by Upstart Business Journal, a national online publication owned by Cincinnati Business Courier's parent company.

Other figures named to the list include Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Steve Case, Jay Z and Taylor Swift, so the local entrepreneurs are in excellent company.

Read the full list and accompanying editor's note here.

 

After spurning Cincinnati, Chiquita decides to close Charlotte HQ


Chiquita Brands International, which moved its headquarters from Cincinnati to Charlotte, N.C., in 2012, announced last week that it would close its Charlotte office in the wake of a recent purchase by Brazilian companies. The Charlotte Business Journal reported Jan. 14 that Chiquita's CEO informed his 320 Charlotte-based employees that morning that the office would be closing as the company is taken private by its new owners.

Chiquita left downtown Cincinnati in 2012 after being courted by Charlotte, which pledged $23 million in local and state incentives. According to the newspaper, Chiquita has collected about $2.5 million of those inducements so far and said it would repay $1 million.

Charlotte Mayor Dan Clodfelter said he hoped the impacted Chiquita employees would stay in town and find other work: "I also want to encourage local employers to consider the impacted employees and their families, as many of them seek other job opportunities in our community."

Chiquita was based in Cincinnati from 1987 until 2012, the first 15 years under the control of majority owner Carl Lindner Jr.

Read more here.

Tech startup funding is "no problem" in Cincinnati


Huffington Post blogger Jason Grill gives big props to Cincinnati's startup scene, saying we now rival Kansas City as his pick for America's most entrepreneurial city.

"The words startup, technology and funding are creeping into the every day vocabulary in the Queen City," Grill writes. "Cincinnati lays claim to a growing and vibrant startup ecosystem. Much of this success is due to what we are seeing across the United States with fewer barriers to entry, but the main part of Cincinnati's success is due in large part to the venture funding access in the city."

Grill goes on to credit CincyTech and Cintrifuse for leading the recent charge here. Bottom line, he says: "Cincinnati is relevant in the startup world."

Read the full blog post here.

Cincinnati improves as one of "America's Best Performing Cities"


Noted urban guru Richard Florida offers his take of the 2014 edition of the Milken Institute’s Best Performing Cities study, which rates 200 large and 179 small metros on key measures of job growth, wage and salary growth and the size and concentration of high tech industry. "The study shows how the recovery has been concentrated in — and, indeed, has revolved around — what I have dubbed the twin pillars of America’s knowledge/energy economy," Florida writes, "with the best performers being energy centers and tech hubs."

San Francisco rated the #1 best performing large U.S. metro area in 2014, followed by Austin, Tex.; Provo, Utah; San Jose, Calif.; and Raleigh, N.C. Nine of the top 10 large cities were in California, Texas or Utah. The top-rated small metro area was Fargo, N.D., followed by Columbus, Ind.

Cincinnati made the list of biggest gainers between 2013 and 2014 among large cities, improving 45 spots to #68 — placing the Tristate around the top third of all large metro areas.

"Ultimately, the report paints a clearer picture of America’s geographically uneven recovery," Florida writes, "where tech hubs and energy centers prosper while older manufacturing and construction driven metros continue to falter."

Read more here.

 

Cincinnatians among Forbes "30 Under 30" changing the world


Forbes magazine is out with its annual "30 Under 30" list of young folks making a mark and changing the world. This year's list has a total of 600 millennials in 20 different categories (art & style, venture capital, consumer tech, music, etc.) — so 30 people in each.

A number of present and past Cincinnatians have a presence on the lists, many of them running startups developed through The Brandery. Konrad Billetz, CEO of Frameri eyeglass startup in Over-the-Rhine, was named among the leaders in manufacturing & industry, while Mayor John Cranley's director of external affairs, Daniel Rajaiah, made the law & policy list; he heads up Cranley's high-profile Task Force on Immigration. The Business Courier has a roundup of other Cincinnati connections to the lists.

Read the Forbes "30 Under 30" section here.
 

Funding for Everything But The House a testament to Cincy startup scene


The Tech Cocktail website describes a new round of venture capital funding for Everything But The House as "a testament to the rise of Cincinnati's tech scene." EBTH recently raised $13 million in Series A funding, which will help the online estate and consignment sale company expand into as many as 50 markets over the next several years. It currently operates in Cincinnati, Columbus, Indianapolis, Louisville, Lexington and Nashville. "By having access to the resources in Cincinnati, we’ve been able to recruit top talent and attract two top-tier venture capital partners to help support our future growth," CEO Andy Nielsen tells Tech Cocktail. "We are proud to call Cincinnati home." Read more here.

Cincinnati one of 8 candidates for "next Silicon Valley"

Cincinnati is one of eight U.S. cities identified as potential "next Silicon Valleys" in a Huffington Post report on new destinations for "burgeoning techies" that was produced in conjunction with Citi Group. Cincinnati "may not seem like the next tech hub from the outside, but it actually is exactly where major investors are flocking," the piece says. It also touts the work The Brandery has done to lead the startup community here, referencing the glowing 2013 profile of the organization at Entrepreneur.com. Read more here.
 

A power surge in the rust belt

General Electric Co. is about to strengthen its ties to downtown Cincinnati in the latest sign that urban centers in the Rust Belt are becoming more attractive to U.S. corporations. Read more.

Introducing managing: Something had to change

You're the Boss is a New York Times blog offers an insider's perspective on small-business ownership. This week, Cincinnati's Fred Warmbier, owner of Finishing Technology Inc., shared his insights on running a small business. Read more.

Kentucky restaurant utilizes interesting alternative to tipping

There's a Kentucky restaurant that has completely abolished tipping, and contrary to what you might expect, it actually looks like it might be great for their servers. Read more.

Mentors help minority companies accelerate growth

Minority business accelerators have launched in a handful of metropolitan areas in recent years as local businesses, chambers of commerce and economic development groups work to create more jobs and improve the quality of life in their regions. The Cincinnati accelerator, created by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber in 2003, has inspired officials and business people in the Greenville, S.C.; Charlotte, N.C., and Newark, N.J. areas to start similar programs. Read more.

Cincy ranked second best city to be a writer

Cincinnati ranked No. 2 on MyLife's list of the 10 best cities to be a writer. Find out why.
157 Jobs Articles | Page: | Show All
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