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Diversity : Cincinnati In The News

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Miami, XU, UC and NKU ranked in Forbes' top 650 colleges

Forbes is out with its annual rankings of U.S. colleges and universities, focusing more than ever on the hot topic of a college degree's return on investment — which it says differentiates its rankings from U.S. News & World Report, among others.

Miami University was the top Cincinnati area college, ranking 167 overall, ahead of Xavier University at 315, University of Cincinnati at 381 and Northern Kentucky University at 626. Other notable area rankings include Indiana University at 112, Ohio State University at 155, University of Dayton at 220, University of Kentucky at 319 and Ohio University at 407.

"While the cost of U.S. higher education escalates, there’s a genuine silver lining in play," Caroline Howard writes in the intro to "America's Top Colleges Ranking 2015." "A growing number of colleges and universities are now focusing on student-consumer value over marketing prestige, making this a new age of return-on-investment education. This pivot is the result of intense public scrutiny on the substantial cost of a degree vs. long tail worth — the very heart of Forbes' definitive Top Colleges ranking, now in its eighth year."

Forbes partnered with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity to rank the top 650 schools on what Howard says distinguishes is "our belief in 'output' over 'input.' We’re not all that interested in what gets a student into college, like our peers who focus heavily on selectivity metrics such as high school class rank, SAT scores and the like. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting out of college?"

Forbes' rankings score colleges on post-graduate success (32.5% of grade), student satisfaction (25%), student debt (25%), academic success (10%) and graduation rate (7.5%).

Read the full Forbes article and rankings here.

Roundup: Media coverage of Tensing indictment

Cincinnati is the latest U.S. city in the media crosshairs over a police shooting of an unarmed African-American citizen. Hamilton County's indictment of UC Officer Ray Tensing on murder charges for the killing of Samuel DuBose hinged directly on video from Tensing's body camera of the traffic stop that led to DuBose's death.

In case you want more information and perspectives, here's a roundup of local and national media coverage surrounding Tensing's indictment and police/community relationships in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Enquirer online section: Everything you need to know about the Samuel DuBose shooting

WCPO: How video differed from report of UC shooting, and why attorneys say it's crucial

P.G. Sittenfeld column at Huffington Post: Why white politicians should say black lives matter

New York Times editorial: This environment of death and distrust is a threat to the fabric of society and to democracy itself

Washington Post column: How the lack of police 'discretion' killed Samuel DuBose and Sandra Bland

CityLab: Police body cameras coming everywhere in 3 to 5 years

New York Times: Glare of video is shifting public's view of police

PBS: Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell talks about Cincinnati's changes in policing since 2001 and how Samuel DuBose's death has stirred up old feelings

MSNBC: How Cincinnati learned from riots in 2001

Christian Science Monitor: Cincinnati shooting tests 'blue wall of silence'

Cincinnati is recapturing and redefining its dining legacy

Cincinnati native Keith Pandolfi makes a convincing argument that Cincinnati is and should be recognized as the next big food city in the U.S.

Writing in Savuer ("a magazine for people who experience the world through food first"), he fills its "Where I'm From" column with memories of great local restaurants from his youth (Pigall's, The Maisonette, The Gourmet Room, The Precinct) and a first-person journey through the city's current high-profile dining spots.

"But Cincinnati is recapturing something," Pandolfi writes, "and while it’s a little different — a little less formal — than the opulent dining scene of its past, it’s definitely something worth checking out the next time a magazine article lures you to Louisville." He bristles at "other midsize cities like Nashville, Pittsburgh and Asheville, all deserving in their own ways, being called the next big food city when hardly anyone says that about Cincinnati."

Read the full Saveur article here.

How Cincinnati nailed the All Star Game

After a solid year of planning and publicity, the 2015 All Star Game has come and gone. What were the main impressions Cincinnati left on the MLB players and officials, the visitors and the media? Will there be any long-term benefits? And what did we residents ultimately get out of the experience?

It'll take months if not years to sort out the benefits, but two things are clear the day after the game: Cincinnati did a masterful job of planning and hosting the All Star Game, and we really lucked out with the weather. Every major outdoor event went off as planned, and even a last-minute replacement headliner for the free concert at Paul Brown Stadium turned lemons into lemonade.

Local organizers were surely dying a thousand deaths during Monday's and Tuesday's storms, but the Cincinnati presented during national TV segments was sunny, balmy and happy.

Here's a roundup of day-after media coverage:

8 ways Cincinnati rocked the All Star Game (Cincinnati Enquirer)

Fans, visitors impressed with Cincinnati's show (WVXU-FM)

All Star players impressed with Cincinnati and events (Local 12)

Cincinnati's All Star festivities a home run for visitors, locals (Business Courier)

9 lessons Cincinnati learned from the All Star Game (WCPO.com)

Alisha Perkins: I was fully prepared to not like Cincinnati, but I kind of fell in love with this place (Huffington Post)

Pete Rose drama plays out on baseball's biggest stage (New York Times)

Curtis Sittenfeld on the institution of marriage in New York Times

You can find in-depth coverage of yesterday's historic Supreme Court ruling in favor of marriage rights for all Americans at Cincinnati.com, CNN and The New York Times. CityBeat reflects on a "a year of queer" before today's Cincinnati Pride events.

Writer Curtis Sittenfeld, a Cincinnati native and P.G.'s sister, has published an opinion piece in The New York Times reacting to the marriage ruling. It's a personal reflection on the institution of marriage titled "Welcome, Everyone, to the Right to Marry."

"For an institution that has, especially in recent weeks and years, been subject to such extensive and vigorous public debate, marriage is strangely unknowable — that is, any particular marriage is mysterious to anyone outside it," she begins. "Think of a couple in your life or the public eye, gay or straight: When they’re alone together, do you imagine they’re nicer, meaner or exactly the same with each other as when they’re around others? Who attends to which household obligations? If they have young kids, how do they handle child care? How frequently do they fight or have sex? Are they, as individuals, fundamentally glad or regretful that they’re together?"

Sittenfeld concludes: "Now that same-sex marriage is legal nationwide, plenty of gay people won’t get married just because they can, just as plenty of straight people don't. Even so, how wonderful that the option exists for all of us."

Read Curtis Sittenfeld's full New York Times article here.

Midwestern cities connect manufacturing past with tomorrow's next big tech invention

Next City looks at how Midwestern cities are trying to revive manufacturing in the startup economy under the catchy title "Cleveland Wants to Make Sure the Next Wright Brothers Come From the Rust Belt." Next City is a nonprofit organization providing daily online coverage of the leaders, policies and innovations driving progress in metropolitan regions across the world.

The article is written by Lee Chilcote, managing editor of Fresh Water, Soapbox's sister publication in Cleveland, and focuses on emerging "hardware" startup scenes in Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown. Although Cincinnati isn't mentioned, the manufacturing startup ecosystem here — embodied at First Batch and Hamilton Mill, among other local business backers — certainly fits the changing dynamic the article describes.

"Hardware startups ... are more viable than ever thanks to evolving prototyping technology and, in many places, a renewed emphasis on advanced manufacturing," Chilcote writes. "While software's promised land has long been Silicon Valley, the Rust Belt is fast becoming a land of milk and honey — and plasma — for hardware. In cities such as Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown, Ohio, there is already an infrastructure for affordable manufacturing in place. Plenty of institutional partners like NASA in Cleveland are eager to support new entrepreneurs."

Read the full Next City article here.

WSJ highlights Cincinnati Art Museum show in Japanese art roundup

The Wall Street Journal's Arts section reviews historic Japanese art now on display in three museums across the U.S.: Cincinnati Art Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, Calif.

"Whether a black-and-gold lacquer box or the vibrant print of a cresting wave, a samurai’s helmet or a flowing silk kimono, Japanese works are a familiar sight in museums across the U.S. today," writes WSJ art critic Lee Lawrence. "Three shows currently on view provide insights into how this came to be."

Cincinnati Art Museum's "Masterpieces of Japanese Art" exhibition is on display through Aug. 30 in Eden Park.

Read the full Wall Street Journal article here.

Have developers figured out the "secret sauce" for gentrifying neighborhoods?

Have urban real estate investors come up with a winning formula to push redevelopment in "transitional" neighborhoods? According to Quartz, the digital news site covering the new global economy, it could be something as simple and intuitive as opening a coffee shop.

"Often, at least in America, we think of regular people as the agents of change — the artist, the boutique coffee shop owner, the tech startup," Sonali Kohli writes. "But as much as gentrification is an organic process, fueled by opportunity seekers and bargain hunters, it’s developers and financiers who have become the savvy midwives of change. Once they detect the early signs of gentrification, they bring on the serious money. ...

"The idea of driving development in an area by attracting trendsetters is not a new one; in fact urban planners took to calling it The Soho Effect in recognition of the revitalization of that New York City neighborhood after artists began moving into empty lofts in the 1970s."

Read the full story here.

Workers need to make $13-$14/hour to afford apartment in Tristate

CityLab discusses a new study by the Pew Research Center on the growing gap between what American hourly workers earn and the rising cost of housing. The study results in a map showing how much a worker needs to earn per hour in each state to rent a two-bedroom apartment, finding that in no state can a person earning minimum wage afford such an apartment at market rent.

You'd have to earn $14.13 per hour in Ohio to afford a two-bedroom apartment, $14.31 in Indiana and $13.14 in Kentucky. The federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour; Ohio raised its minimum wage to $8.10/hour this year, while Indiana and Kentucky use the federally mandated rate.

CityLab also looks at the cost of moving to one-bedroom apartments, though the hourly pay requirements aren't spelled out state-by-state. Instead, a second map indicates that someone in Ohio working a minimum-wage job would need to work 54 hours a week to afford a one-bedroom apartment; Indiana workers would have to work 62 hours/week and Kentucky workers 57 hours/week.

"Rents keep rising because the demand for rentals keeps growing, and that’s partly because fewer people can afford to buy their homes today than they could before the recession," the article says. "The low supply of rentals has created a situation where people who definitely can’t afford to buy are also priced out of renting."

Read the full story here.

Cincinnati's police reform after 2001 riots is a national model

Cincinnati Police reforms resulting from a U.S. Justice Dept. consent decree after the 2001 riots here are in the news every time another major city undergoes soul-searching following the death of an African American at the hands of police. The latest news story was about Cleveland's own consent decree from the Justice Dept. that will attempt to clean up a broken relationship between that city's police and its citizens.

"Cincinnati’s lessons seem newly relevant as officials call for police reform in the aftermath of the deaths of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Michael Brown in Ferguson and Tamir Rice in Cleveland," Alana Semuels writes in The Atlantic. "Indeed, the recently released report from President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing recommends that departments adopt some of the strategies used by Cincinnati. A task force convened by Ohio Governor John Kasich cited Cincinnati as a model for community-oriented policing and recommended that other law-enforcement agencies in that state develop similar reforms."

Semuels offers a long, nuanced story about the long path the Cincinnati Police Dept. has traveled from its own broken community relationship to today's role as "a model for community-oriented policing." Things aren't perfect here by any stretch, as the rash of recent shootings have some questioning if the police are still on the right path.

Still, "for a great many other cities, Cincinnati’s imperfect present provides a glimpse of a much better future," Semuels writes.

Read the full story here.

Memorial Day weekend event recommendations

Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial kickoff to summer, featuring Taste of Cincinnati returning for the 37th year and lots of neighborhood parades, picnics and ceremonies honoring military veterans. Here's a roundup of local media coverage and recommendations:

Read the official 2015 Taste of Cincinnati event guide here.

The Enquirer's preview of Taste of Cincinnati, including Polly Campbell's recommended dishes, is here.

WCPO.com's preview of Taste of Cincinnati is here.

WVXU-FM has an interview with Taste of Cincinnati Communications Director Rich Walburg and others here.

See CityBeat's "to do" staff picks for weekend activities here.

Rasputin Todd's Enquirer recommendations for weekend things to do are here.

Locally filmed 'Carol' gets rave reviews at Cannes

Todd Haynes' 1950s-era drama Carol, filmed in Cincinnati last year, debuted this past weekend at the Cannes Film Festival in France to outstanding reviews, writes Steve Rosen on today's CityBeat staff blog. He says Cannes critics "called it an instant Oscar contender and the most important high-profile gay drama to come out of American cinema since 2005's Brokeback Mountain."

Carol stars Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara in a story (based on the 1952 novel The Price of Salt) about a socialite who falls in love with a young department-store clerk.

Rosen links to published reviews from Variety ("the most important publication chronicling the entertainment business") and indieWire ("the most influential website for the independent-film industry").

Read the full post here.

Cincinnati's street art highlighted in Paste travel story

Writer Karen Gardiner notes that people in-the-know about street art head for Brooklyn, Berlin and Bristol to see work by the best-known artists, but, as she writes in Paste, "there are more and more destinations where you can see work by both artists local to the area and the bigger names." She then lists her 11 favorite "Lesser-Known Cities for Street Art" in a photo gallery — starting off with Cincinnati.

"Much of the street art you will see in Cincinnati are large-scale murals by the local ArtWorks organization," Gardiner writes, although she says several internationally known artists have also "made their mark." She photographed the above work on the outside of the former Mainstay and Societe clubs on Fifth Street to run with her story.

Read the full story here.

Price Hill volunteer Patti Hogan and Soapbox writer Liz McEwan interviewed on WVXU

Price Hill's "super-volunteer" Patti Hogan was profiled in a recent Soapbox story by Liz McEwan, and the reaction from friends, neighbors and residents was extremely positive — many feel that the West Side doesn't get enough attention for its efforts to improve. WVXU's "Cincinnati Edition" agreed, asking Hogan and McEwan to appear on the program April 9 to discuss Price Hill's struggles and successes.

Listen to the WVXU interview here.

How Cincinnati's Jim Obergefell became the face of the Supreme Court gay marriage case

The Washington Post has an in-depth feature story on Cincinnati's Jim Obergefell, whose name is attached to the consolidated cases the U.S. Supreme Court will be hearing soon to decide whether gay couples have a constitutional right to marry.

“If the Supreme Court decides in favor of full marriage equality, it will be the largest conferral of rights on LGBT people in the history of our country," the story quotes Fred Sainz, vice president of communications at the Human Rights Campaign. "There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that Jim will become a historic figure."

Obergefell married John Arthur in July 2013 in a medical jet at Baltimore-Washington International Airport because Ohio doesn't allow gay marriages while Maryland does. Arthur was dying from ALS and would pass several months later. Obergefell sued the state of Ohio to have his name listed as Arthur's surviving spouse, and the decisions and appeals resulting from that lawsuit have now reached the Supreme Court as Obergefell v. Hodges.

Read the full story here.
158 Diversity Articles | Page: | Show All
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