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Arts + Culture : Cincinnati In The News

291 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All

MLB.com highlights Cincinnati's attractions for All Star Game visitors

Now come the national media stories highlighting Cincinnati's restaurants, bars, arts & culture, museums and general urban renaissance to provide All Star Game visitors with a well-rounded picture of what to expect during their time here. Leading off is Major League Baseball itself, going for a home run overview of Cincinnati attractions along with Skyline, Graeter's and Montgomery Inn ribs.

"Seemingly in a renaissance for progress and development, it feels like the perfect summer for Cincinnati to be hosting the All-Star Game presented by T-Mobile," the MLB.com article opens. "A lot has changed since 1988, when the city last hosted the Midsummer Classic. Cincinnati was known then (and now) for being a baseball town with its own unique style of chili. Today, it has a chance to be recognized for much more."

Read the full MLB.com article here.

Union Terminal the most beautiful place in Ohio

Food/drink/travel website Thrillist has published a list of the most beautiful places in all 50 states, and their choice for Ohio is Union Terminal, home of the Cincinnati Museum Center. It's one of only two buildings highlighted across the U.S., with most of the beauty spots being parks, lakes, mountains, beaches and other natural wonders.

Calling Union Terminal "the greatest cultural advance Cincinnati has given the world since the Ickey Shuffle," Thrillist likes the combination of multiple museums featuring "large-scale models of the city and replicas of ancient caves that you can actually walk through" and "Gilded Age architecture that denotes an old-school rail station."

Read the full Thrillist story and list here.

WSJ highlights Cincinnati Art Museum show in Japanese art roundup

The Wall Street Journal's Arts section reviews historic Japanese art now on display in three museums across the U.S.: Cincinnati Art Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, Calif.

"Whether a black-and-gold lacquer box or the vibrant print of a cresting wave, a samurai’s helmet or a flowing silk kimono, Japanese works are a familiar sight in museums across the U.S. today," writes WSJ art critic Lee Lawrence. "Three shows currently on view provide insights into how this came to be."

Cincinnati Art Museum's "Masterpieces of Japanese Art" exhibition is on display through Aug. 30 in Eden Park.

Read the full Wall Street Journal article here.

Beer and baseball traditions make Cincinnati a "fun Midwest destination"

The New York Daily News has a new travel piece focusing on Cincinnati's beer brewing and baseball traditions, mixed with first-person impressions of riverfront development on both sides of the Ohio, downtown hotel and restaurant options and the renaissance in Over-the-Rhine.

"To a degree Cincinnati can't help but channel its past," J.P. Hoornstra writes. "The centralized downtown neighborhood known as Over-the-Rhine claims to be the largest urban historic district in the country, densely packed with 19th-century brick buildings built in the Italianate style. The neighborhood shows its age but is also increasingly livable, walkable and shop-able.

"Shopping in historic buildings is fun, but not always the substance of a vacation. What sets Cincinnati apart is how it's rallied around its baseball, beer and old buildings, creating a unique urban Midwest destination."

Read the full New York Daily News story here.

Fodor's ranks Cincinnati Zoo in top 10 U.S. zoos

Fodor's, one of the best-known names in travel guides, has published its list of the 10 best U.S. zoos and included Cincinnati Zoo.

"These ten zoos deliver local wildlife experiences where endangered species are nurtured, ferocious predators are kept within feet of the public, and a renaissance of education in conservation and science is incorporated throughout, promising fun for the whole family," the list's introduction says.

Cincinnati Zoo is praised for its animal demonstrations and talks; choice opportunities to feed giraffes and watch elephants bathe and cheetahs run; and for being the nation's second oldest zoo.

"(Cincinnati) zoo has a long history of animal conservation and animal awareness initiatives, including Project Saving Species, a fund that channels money throughout the world to projects dedicated to animal welfare," the story says.

Check out the full list here.

3CDC, CDF awarded $87 million in federal tax credits

Cincinnati's two premier nonprofit economic development organizations, 3CDC and Cincinnati Development Fund (CDF), have received federal New Market Tax Credits totaling more than $87 million, the Business Courier reported June 15. The announcement comes a year after neither received them, a big disappointment that temporarily slowed their respective investment plans.

3CDC, through its Cincinnati New Markets Fund, was awarded $45 million and CDF $42.35 million.

"The tax credits help plug gaps in financing for difficult projects located in areas from which private developers shy away," the Business Courier article says.

Upcoming 3CDC projects that might utilize the tax credits include housing and retail on Race Street and additional food/drink options in Over-the-Rhine as well as Memorial Hall, Music Hall and Ziegler Park renovations. Cincinnati Development Fund likely will invest in additional homeownership projects and could free up additional funds for its new facilities and equipment loan program for nonprofits.

Read the full Business Courier story here.

Memorial Day weekend event recommendations

Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial kickoff to summer, featuring Taste of Cincinnati returning for the 37th year and lots of neighborhood parades, picnics and ceremonies honoring military veterans. Here's a roundup of local media coverage and recommendations:

Read the official 2015 Taste of Cincinnati event guide here.

The Enquirer's preview of Taste of Cincinnati, including Polly Campbell's recommended dishes, is here.

WCPO.com's preview of Taste of Cincinnati is here.

WVXU-FM has an interview with Taste of Cincinnati Communications Director Rich Walburg and others here.

See CityBeat's "to do" staff picks for weekend activities here.

Rasputin Todd's Enquirer recommendations for weekend things to do are here.

Locally filmed 'Carol' gets rave reviews at Cannes

Todd Haynes' 1950s-era drama Carol, filmed in Cincinnati last year, debuted this past weekend at the Cannes Film Festival in France to outstanding reviews, writes Steve Rosen on today's CityBeat staff blog. He says Cannes critics "called it an instant Oscar contender and the most important high-profile gay drama to come out of American cinema since 2005's Brokeback Mountain."

Carol stars Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara in a story (based on the 1952 novel The Price of Salt) about a socialite who falls in love with a young department-store clerk.

Rosen links to published reviews from Variety ("the most important publication chronicling the entertainment business") and indieWire ("the most influential website for the independent-film industry").

Read the full post here.

Cincinnati Symphony's stability, growth in stark contrast to many other U.S. orchestras

The New York Times took notice of last week's announcements from Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra about its successful fundraising campaign and a new musician contract that will allow it to hire 14 more full-time players over the next four years. Classical music writer Michael Cooper says that the CSO's expansion of the ensemble to 90 members is in stark contrast to many other orchestras around the country, from Philadelphia to Atlanta, that are shedding positions to save money.

"The orchestra world is all too familiar with vicious cycles of mounting deficits, dwindling audiences, difficulty raising money and cuts," Cooper writes. "But at the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, things are moving happily in the opposite direction: think crescendo, not diminuendo."

Read the full story here.

Cincinnati one of 10 cities recommended for relocations

The Huffington Post is reporting on new Lincoln Property recommendations for the "Top 10 Cities for Relocation" that considers a city's nightlife, culture, food, weather and rent costs. Cincinnati makes the list, which is arranged in random order and includes Austin, Tex.; Boulder, Colo.; and Philadelphia.

Cincinnati's infographic highlights Oktoberfest, cornhole, the Reds, our signature chili and our location "opposite the mouth of the Licking River."

Read the full article here.

Rare Declaration of Independence copy to be displayed at Museum Center for first time

A rare print of the Declaration of Independence has been in the Cincinnati History Museum's collection for 140 years but will be being displayed in public for the first time at the Cincinnati Museum Center, The New York Times explains in its Arts section.

Known as the Holt Broadside, the document is a version of the Declaration of Independence printed by John Holt in White Plains, N.Y. on July 9, 1776 after New York's provincial congress voted to authorize the declaration. Only three other copies are known to exist.

"The Cincinnati copy originally belonged to Richard Fosdick, a native of New London, Conn., who moved in 1810 to Cincinnati, where he founded the city's first pork-packing business," Times writer William Grimes says. "It is not known how he came by the document or how it made its way to the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, a predecessor of the Cincinnati History Museum. It languished, cataloged but ignored, until 2010."

The Cincinnati Museum Center issued a press release today about the Holt Broadside, announcing it would be displayed for the first time as part of its exhibition Treasures of Our Military Past, opening May 15. The communication sheds light on where the Holt Broadside has been all this time, perhaps taking exception to the Times' characterization of it "languishing" and being "ignored."

"How the Holt broadside ended up in the Cincinnati History Library and Archives at Cincinnati Museum Center is fairly well documented," the Museum Center says. "On the back of the document is the signature of Richard Fosdick, a native of New London, Connecticut, who brought the document, along with his family, across the mountains and down the Ohio River to settle in Cincinnati in 1810. ... Following his death in 1837, his estate, including the broadside, was divided among his living children. One of his children or grandchildren likely donated the Holt broadside to the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, the predecessor of the Cincinnati History Library and Archives. ... A handwritten '18801' in red ink indicates that the document has been in the Society's holdings since the 1870s."

Check out the document for yourself starting on May 15.

Read the full New York Times story here.

Cincinnati's street art highlighted in Paste travel story

Writer Karen Gardiner notes that people in-the-know about street art head for Brooklyn, Berlin and Bristol to see work by the best-known artists, but, as she writes in Paste, "there are more and more destinations where you can see work by both artists local to the area and the bigger names." She then lists her 11 favorite "Lesser-Known Cities for Street Art" in a photo gallery — starting off with Cincinnati.

"Much of the street art you will see in Cincinnati are large-scale murals by the local ArtWorks organization," Gardiner writes, although she says several internationally known artists have also "made their mark." She photographed the above work on the outside of the former Mainstay and Societe clubs on Fifth Street to run with her story.

Read the full story here.

Cincinnati is #10 best city for college graduates to find work, housing and fun

Cincinnati makes another list of the best U.S. cities, this time from Rent.com.

"Spring is in the air, and for many college seniors this also means it’s graduation season," says the intro to a new study at Rent.com. "Aside from coordinating their cap and gown, college graduates are also faced with many major life decisions, like where they will land a job and what city they want to live in."

By Rent.com's measures, Cincinnati is the 10th best U.S. city for college grads to start out their careers and lives. The top three are Washington, D.C.; Minneapolis-St. Paul; and Denver.

Read the full article here.

Constella Festival is "challenging the misconceptions of classical music"

Cincinnati's annual Constella Festival of Music & Fine Arts is called "the festival that's challenging the misconceptions of classical music" in a preview article published in Huffington Post's Arts & Culture section.

In December Soapbox wrote about founder Tatiana Berman's efforts to expand Constella's reach by employing more digital promotions that "target audiences nationally to come to Cincinnati." This Huffington Post piece will certainly help with her goal.

"Unlike the standard classical music circuit — characterized by what Berman's team describes as the 100 concert a year demanding schedule — Constella seeks to, in essence, maintain the intimacy of classical music, but encourage the experimentation and chance-taking," the article says.

The Constella Festival runs April 8-19 at Memorial Hall, Woodward Theatre, Cincinnati Art Museum, SCPA and several other venues. Get festival details and buy tickets here.

Read the full Huffington Post article here.

MusicNOW featured in New York Times preview of 2015 music festivals

MusicNOW will celebrate its 10th year in March, when The National's Bryce Dessner expands his annual avant garde music festival to three Over-the-Rhine venues: Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the new Woodward Theater. Despite living in New York City, where he formed The National with brother Aaron and three other Cincinnatians, Dessner has kept his festival rooted in his hometown.

New York Times music writer Jon Pareles takes note of MusicNOW's endurance and unique point of view in his feature story on 2015's upcoming festival gauntlet, "Anticipating Coachella, Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, Firefly and More." After previewing the big festivals named in the headline, he says, "A promising development in festival-making, somewhere between the sprawl and the niche, is the growing number often described as 'curated.' ... The curators are often musicians, who tend to delve far beyond their own chosen genres. Musicians listen carefully and widely, and their choices often reveal unexpected foundations and extrapolations of their own aesthetics."

The article has just three photos, including one of MusicNOW from Cincinnatian Keith Klenowski (pictured above).

Read the full article here.
291 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
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