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Arts + Culture : Cincinnati In The News

282 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All

Cincinnati one of 10 cities recommended for relocations


The Huffington Post is reporting on new Lincoln Property recommendations for the "Top 10 Cities for Relocation" that considers a city's nightlife, culture, food, weather and rent costs. Cincinnati makes the list, which is arranged in random order and includes Austin, Tex.; Boulder, Colo.; and Philadelphia.

Cincinnati's infographic highlights Oktoberfest, cornhole, the Reds, our signature chili and our location "opposite the mouth of the Licking River."

Read the full article here.
 

Rare Declaration of Independence copy to be displayed at Museum Center for first time


A rare print of the Declaration of Independence has been in the Cincinnati History Museum's collection for 140 years but will be being displayed in public for the first time at the Cincinnati Museum Center, The New York Times explains in its Arts section.

Known as the Holt Broadside, the document is a version of the Declaration of Independence printed by John Holt in White Plains, N.Y. on July 9, 1776 after New York's provincial congress voted to authorize the declaration. Only three other copies are known to exist.

"The Cincinnati copy originally belonged to Richard Fosdick, a native of New London, Conn., who moved in 1810 to Cincinnati, where he founded the city's first pork-packing business," Times writer William Grimes says. "It is not known how he came by the document or how it made its way to the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, a predecessor of the Cincinnati History Museum. It languished, cataloged but ignored, until 2010."

The Cincinnati Museum Center issued a press release today about the Holt Broadside, announcing it would be displayed for the first time as part of its exhibition Treasures of Our Military Past, opening May 15. The communication sheds light on where the Holt Broadside has been all this time, perhaps taking exception to the Times' characterization of it "languishing" and being "ignored."

"How the Holt broadside ended up in the Cincinnati History Library and Archives at Cincinnati Museum Center is fairly well documented," the Museum Center says. "On the back of the document is the signature of Richard Fosdick, a native of New London, Connecticut, who brought the document, along with his family, across the mountains and down the Ohio River to settle in Cincinnati in 1810. ... Following his death in 1837, his estate, including the broadside, was divided among his living children. One of his children or grandchildren likely donated the Holt broadside to the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, the predecessor of the Cincinnati History Library and Archives. ... A handwritten '18801' in red ink indicates that the document has been in the Society's holdings since the 1870s."

Check out the document for yourself starting on May 15.

Read the full New York Times story here.
 

Cincinnati's street art highlighted in Paste travel story


Writer Karen Gardiner notes that people in-the-know about street art head for Brooklyn, Berlin and Bristol to see work by the best-known artists, but, as she writes in Paste, "there are more and more destinations where you can see work by both artists local to the area and the bigger names." She then lists her 11 favorite "Lesser-Known Cities for Street Art" in a photo gallery — starting off with Cincinnati.

"Much of the street art you will see in Cincinnati are large-scale murals by the local ArtWorks organization," Gardiner writes, although she says several internationally known artists have also "made their mark." She photographed the above work on the outside of the former Mainstay and Societe clubs on Fifth Street to run with her story.

Read the full story here.
 

Cincinnati is #10 best city for college graduates to find work, housing and fun


Cincinnati makes another list of the best U.S. cities, this time from Rent.com.

"Spring is in the air, and for many college seniors this also means it’s graduation season," says the intro to a new study at Rent.com. "Aside from coordinating their cap and gown, college graduates are also faced with many major life decisions, like where they will land a job and what city they want to live in."

By Rent.com's measures, Cincinnati is the 10th best U.S. city for college grads to start out their careers and lives. The top three are Washington, D.C.; Minneapolis-St. Paul; and Denver.

Read the full article here.
 

Constella Festival is "challenging the misconceptions of classical music"


Cincinnati's annual Constella Festival of Music & Fine Arts is called "the festival that's challenging the misconceptions of classical music" in a preview article published in Huffington Post's Arts & Culture section.

In December Soapbox wrote about founder Tatiana Berman's efforts to expand Constella's reach by employing more digital promotions that "target audiences nationally to come to Cincinnati." This Huffington Post piece will certainly help with her goal.

"Unlike the standard classical music circuit — characterized by what Berman's team describes as the 100 concert a year demanding schedule — Constella seeks to, in essence, maintain the intimacy of classical music, but encourage the experimentation and chance-taking," the article says.

The Constella Festival runs April 8-19 at Memorial Hall, Woodward Theatre, Cincinnati Art Museum, SCPA and several other venues. Get festival details and buy tickets here.

Read the full Huffington Post article here.
 

MusicNOW featured in New York Times preview of 2015 music festivals


MusicNOW will celebrate its 10th year in March, when The National's Bryce Dessner expands his annual avant garde music festival to three Over-the-Rhine venues: Memorial Hall, Music Hall and the new Woodward Theater. Despite living in New York City, where he formed The National with brother Aaron and three other Cincinnatians, Dessner has kept his festival rooted in his hometown.

New York Times music writer Jon Pareles takes note of MusicNOW's endurance and unique point of view in his feature story on 2015's upcoming festival gauntlet, "Anticipating Coachella, Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, Firefly and More." After previewing the big festivals named in the headline, he says, "A promising development in festival-making, somewhere between the sprawl and the niche, is the growing number often described as 'curated.' ... The curators are often musicians, who tend to delve far beyond their own chosen genres. Musicians listen carefully and widely, and their choices often reveal unexpected foundations and extrapolations of their own aesthetics."

The article has just three photos, including one of MusicNOW from Cincinnatian Keith Klenowski (pictured above).

Read the full article here.

Cincinnati Opera gets national nod in opera guide for beginners


HuffPost Arts & Culture has published what it calls "Your Definitive Guide to Going to the Opera," with tips about which operas to see depending on your tastes in movies, what to wear and what to do at intermission.

"Because opera is not a mainstream form of entertainment, it is often regarded as a pretentious one, something untouchable," the article begins. "However, if you give it a fighting chance, you'll find that opera can be enjoyed by classical musicians and complete newcomers alike — old to young."

The section concludes with a photo slideshow of America's top 14 opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera. Strangely, the photo they use to illustrate Cincinnati Opera is of a solo pianist in an empty Music Hall — the exact opposite of the local company's lavish productions, amazing sets and live orchestra.

Read the full story here.
 

Louis Langree says "Bonjour, Cincinnati!"


Vanity Fair's February issue includes a quick interview with Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Music Director Louis Langree, focusing on his role with the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra in New York City's Lincoln Center. They do ask him how he's getting used to being in the hinterlands of Cincinnati, far from his French homeland.

"Yes, I’m French," Langree says, noting Cincinnati's collective German heritage, "but I come from Alsace, which is French with some German DNA."

Read the interview here.

Camp Washington Chili dubbed a national "classic"


The Eater website is currently promoting "Classics Week," featuring stories on dozens of iconic dishes and recipes from around the U.S. — including "How Camp Washington's Chili-Topped Spaghetti Became Cincinnati Legend."

Eater Associate Editor Hillary Dixler provides a brief introduction to Cincinnati's spaghetti/chili/cheese signature dish for (likely aghast) readers, including its origin story centered on Greek immigrants. She then has co-owner Maria Papakirk take us on a step-by-step tour of how to correctly build a five-way, with lots of photos.

Eater describes itself as "the source for people who care about dining and drinking in the nation's most important food cities." It's one of a number of online publications owned by Vox Media, which also operates SB Nation, The Verge and Vox.com.

Read the glowing report here.
 

Bach and Boombox declassifies the classics

Cincinnati-based Bach and Boombox declassifies the classics, mixing the Beastie Boys with Beethoven. Read more.
 

CCM alumni create thrills and chills in 'Gone Girl' movie

While "Gone Girl" movie audiences were gasping for the last few weekends, two University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music alumni were grinning. Dawn Swiderski (BFA Theatre Design & Production, 1989) was the film’s art director, and actor Cooper Thornton (MFA Dramatic Performance, 1992) played the role of Dr. Benson. Read more.

Check out Cincinnati's new cool

Long known for its industrial past, Cincinnati is getting new life from craft breweries, bold new restaurants and a major neighborhood transformed. Read more.

Know a Theatre: Know Theatre of Cincinnati

Taking a page from The Colbert Report's sporadic Better Know a District Congressional interview feature (but minus the satiric intent), American Theatre has inaugurated a new series to introduce the national theatre audience to a different theatre every other week, starting with Cincinnati's Know Theatre. Read more.

Local violin maker wins silver at international violin competition

Damon Gray, a local violin maker, won a Silver Medal for tone at the Violin Society of America’s International competition in September. Read more.

CraftBeer.com hosts 'Art & Craft: A Tale of Beer and Brushes'

CraftBeer.com hosts the exclusive online premiere of "Art & Craft: A Tale of Beer and Brushes," a video created by LEAPFrame to document Keith Neltner's and Artworks' Brewery District mural. Check out the video.
282 Arts + Culture Articles | Page: | Show All
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