| Follow Us:

Columbia Tusculum : Buzz

40 Columbia Tusculum Articles | Page: | Show All

Public Library of Cincinnati gets five-star rating

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County accepted a national honor last week from the library field’s leading professional publication. "The Library Journal Index of Public Library Service" awarded the public library a five-star rating for service. Read more.

Cincinnati named one of Top 100 Best Places to Live

Livability.com named Cincinnati one of the Top 100 Best Places to Live. Read more.

Eli's BBQ named best in Midwest

Food & Wine Magazine knows where to find the best BBQ—Cincinnati's Eli's BBQ. After selling his signature pulled-pork sandwich at local markets, Elias Leisring opened this bare-bones spot. His signature move: using a pizza cutter to chop the pulled pork extra-fine.

See the full list here.

Mile High Club booming in Cincinnati

At $425 a pop, what may be the nation's only Mile High Club has been quietly operating for more than 20 years at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport. Business hit warp speed after Valentine's Day stories featuring Flamingo Air in local and national media.

Read the full story here.

Pinnacle confirms $45M deal for River Downs

Pinnacle Entertainment plans to purchase Cincinnati's River Downs for 45 million dollars in cash. Pinnacle will revitalize River Downs as a gaming entertainment destination, which will provide new full-time jobs and new tax revenue for the state and local community.

Read the full story here.

Reyes wins Flying Pig Marathon

Sergio Reyes of Palmdale, California won Cincinnati's annual Flying Pig Marathon in 2 hours, 20 minutes and 37 seconds amongst a record field of more than 16,000 runners.

Reyes called the marathon one of the most scenic races he's ever run.  The race started in downtown Cincinnati and then twisted through many of the city's scenic neighborhoods, hills and even followed along the Ohio River for several miles.

This year marked the 12th year for the Flying Pig Marathon which gets its name from Cincinnati's former status as the pork-packing capital.  Autumn Ray of Galveston, Texas won the women's side in 2 hours, 52 minutes and 23 seconds.

Read full article here.

Terry's Turf Club makes Food Network Magazine's "ultimate burger" list

Cincinnati's own, Terry's Turf Club, has long been known locally for their delectable burgers, but now that recognition has gone nationwide as the restaurant has landed on Food Network Magazine's list of the "ulitmate burgers."

The Linwood neighborhood establishment was selected as Ohio's best when it came to selecting "the most exciting, interesting, wacky or otherwise fabulous burger in every state."

Located at 4618 Eastern Avenue, Terry's Turf Club is open Monday-Thursday 4pm to midnight, Friday 4pm to 2:30am, Saturday noon to 2:30am and Sunday noon to 9pm.

Read full article here.

Hamilton County taxes lower than its peers

A recent Forbes survey finds that Hamilton County's property tax rate is the lowest, as a percentage of income, of Ohio's six largest urban areas, says Hamilton County Commissioner David Pepper.

In his PepTalk blog, Pepper says that there are misconceptions about the county's tax rate, but that it's actually relatively low when compared to other metropolitan areas against which it competes for jobs, businesses, and talent.

The Forbes survey found that Hamilton County's property tax rate as a percentage of income was 26 percent lower than Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), 16 percent lower than Franklin County (Columbus), and 8.5 percent lower than Summit County (Akron).

Hamilton County's sales tax was also the lowest of the top six urban counties, tied with Summit County.

Read the blog post here.

Spohr appointed to direct SW Ohio workforce development

Jennifer Spohr has been appointed as the regional workforce director of the Ohio Department of Development's (ODOD) Southwest Ohio office.

In her new role, Spohr will serve as a liaison to state government, local business leaders, elected officials, and economic and workforce development entities to meet the training and talent development needs of businesses throughout Hamilton, Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties.

Spohr joined ODOD in 2005 as coordinator for the Ohio Investment in Training Program and is currently on the Greater Cincinnati Workforce Network's Hard-2-Hire Workforce subcommittee.

This year, she received from Cincinnati mayor Mark Mallory the 2009 Super Award from the Workforce One Investment Board of Southwest Ohio in recognition for her work with the SuperJobs Center.

Read the full release here.

Ohio's 10 best-kept secrets

Following a year and a half of talking to Ohio's business leaders and executives, the Ohio Business Development Coalition has compiled a list of the ten best-kept secrets about doing business in Ohio.

Everybody knows about the relatively low cost of living and the advantageous location, but what other advantages does Ohio have?

I'm not going to give it all away here!

You'll have to read the full article here.

Mayor Mallory gets assurances from President Obama

Following a meeting with President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden at the White House, Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory says that he's assured that Cincinnati will receive its fair share of the $787 billion federal economic stimulus bill.

According to Mallory, the president told the 80 mayors in attendance that stimulus money will be on the streets within six months and is expected to be spent on projects within 18 months.

He was also pleased that $7 billion of the $12 billion set aside for transit projects would go directly to cities, instead of being funnelled through state governments.

"The president stressed several things, that he understands the importance of cities as it relates to stimulating the economy," Mallory tells the Enquirer.

Read the full article here.

Mayor Mallory names new YP Kitchen Cabinet

A new Cincinnati Young Professionals Kitchen Cabinet was announced Tuesday, and already they're charged with working on a major initiative.

The group must prepare a proposal, due this month, to host the 2009 Next Leaders Summit, the largest meeting of young professional groups in the nation.

Mayor Mark Mallory started the advisory group in 2006 in an effort to coordinate the activites of various YP groups throughout the region, with the goal of attracting and retaining young professionals.

This year saw a record number of applicants for the cabinet, Mallory tells the Enquirer.

Read the full article here.

Cincinnati submits $332M stimulus wish list

Cincinnati mayor Mark Mallory has submitted a request for $332 million to fund 51 projects as part of the proposed $819 billion federal stimulus package.

The list includes $190 million in water and sewer projects, $74 million for new streets and related infrastructure, and $24 million for public improvements connected to neighborhood economic development initiatives.

Also requested was $12.6 million to conduct an engineering study to determine the best route for an Over-the-Rhine-to-Uptown streetcar connector.

Mallory estimates that more than 3,600 jobs would be created if the list of projects were fully funded.

Read the full article here.

Cincinnati in top 30 most wired cities

Cincinnati has ranked as the 28th most wired city in the United States, according to an annual evaluation conducted by Forbes.com.

Forbes measured cities' "wired quotient" by computing the percentage of Internet users with high-speed connections, the number of companies providing high-speed Internet, and the number of public Wi-Fi hotspots.

Placing between Philadelphia and Columbus, Cincinnati received top 20 marks for broadband adoption and Wi-Fi hotspots, but lost ground due to the number of service providers available.

Ohio has invested heavily in providing 100 percent broadband access throughout the state, and the Obama administration and House Democrats have proposed including $6 billion for broadband infrastructure as part of the economic stimulus package.

Read the full article here.

New regional transit agency in the works

Cincinnati and Hamilton County have reached an agreement on a new regional transit agency that could give more say to suburban governments - if they are willing to pay.

The Greater Cincinnati Regional Transit Authority would consist of a 13-member board, with seven being appointed by the City of Cincinnati and six from Hamilton County.

Butler, Clermont and Warren counties would be able to directly appoint board members if they formally join the new agency, and could gain a majority of the board seats if they contribute more than 50 percent of the agency's budget.

Both the City of Cincinnati and the Hamilton County Commission are likely to consider resolutions on the matter this month.

Read the full article here.
40 Columbia Tusculum Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts