| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Vimeo RSS Feed

talent : For Good

305 talent Articles | Page: | Show All

The Women's Fund to celebrate male supporters at Guys Who Get It 2.0

The Women’s Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation is the only women’s fund in the United States to include men.
 
That’s because individuals like Aftab Pureval, a member of The Women’s Fund’s Leadership Council, recognize it takes more than half the population working together to make significant progress.
 
While Pureval says he’s proud that Cincinnati’s Women’s Fund is the only mixed-gender one in the U.S., he’s also surprised by it.
 
“The face of poverty in Cincinnati is women. Cincinnati is second in the nation for childhood poverty, and a majority of those children are raised by single mothers working multiple jobs just to make ends meet,” Pureval says.
 
According to Pureval, Cincinnati is also one of the worst in the country when it comes to economic mobility.
 
“If you are born poor in Cincinnati, chances are you will die poor,” Pureval says. “These issues are not just women's issues.  They are important to the future of our city. And the Women's Fund needs the talents from men and women of all walks of life if we are to succeed in our fight against poverty.”
 
To gain more of those talents across gender, The Women’s Fund is hosting Guys Who Get It 2.0 to raise awareness and celebrate the men in our community who understand that women’s self-sufficiency is an effort everyone should get behind.
 
“The Women's Fund sets ambitious, region-wide goals, and works aggressively to achieve them,” Pureval says. “I joined because I was inspired by the people at The Women's Fund and by their results. The simple fact is investing in women works.”

Do Good:

•    If you are a guy who gets it, or knows of guys who get it, sign up to attend Guys Who Get It 2.0 and attend the event from 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

•    Support The Women's Fund by giving.

•    If you'd like to get involved, contact Vanessa Freytag, executive director of The Women's Fund. 
 

Holidays in the Bag to benefit new nonprofit in OTR

Black Friday shopping is just around the corner, and one way to participate and save—without leaving your Thanksgiving festivities early, and while also supporting small businesses and a local nonprofit—is through Over-the-Rhine Chamber’s Holidays in the Bag initiative.
 
Holidays in the Bag: A Black Friday Shop Local event, allows shoppers to receive discounts at more than 25 participating businesses through the purchase of an official “Holiday Bag” for $5. All proceeds from Holiday Bag sales benefit an OTR nonprofit.

This year’s beneficiary is Future Leaders OTR, a nonprofit that empowers OTR 7th-12th graders to transform themselves and their community through personal and professional development, in addition to leadership experiences.
 
“This program changes the paradigm for these kids in our neighborhood,” says Ryan Messer, founder of Future Leaders OTR. “Before all of this rebirth in OTR, they lived in a predominately African American community, and their exposure to the people coming in may have felt like, ‘Wow, all these people who are largely Caucasian are moving into my neighborhood,’ and I think what we’re showing them is there is opportunity through diversity.”
 
At the Holidays Kick Off Party last Tuesday, Future Leaders OTR engaged with other residents and local professionals, and it was an experience that Renàe Banks, Future Leaders OTR program manager, says inspired a confidence in the youth.
 
“It was quite amazing to see them walk in and someone ask them, ‘What is your name?’ Their head would be down, but then as the night progressed, they became more comfortable and more confident with what they had to say and were excited that people were inquiring about who they are and what they were doing,” Banks says.

“You saw a confidence come over them, and they went from standing at the booth to venturing off into the crowd to engage in conversation with other professionals," she continues. "When you put them in an environment where there’s professionalism, laughter, conversation about culture—they’ll reflect that.” 

Do Good:

•    Purchase a Holiday Bag, beginning November 26, to support Future Leaders OTR.

•    Like Future Leaders OTR on Facebook.

•    Spread the word about Future Leaders OTR, and if you know of an OTR youth who might be interested, or if you want to get involved, contact the organization. 
 

Kicks For Kids to deliver another memorable holiday for at-risk kids

Kicks For Kids, a Covington-based nonprofit that aims to “level the playing field for local children at risk,” is prepping for its Annual Christmas Celebration. The event merges giving and receiving and enables children to take a break from the everyday stress of life.
 
“It lets them know that, despite everything, life can be good. There can be joy, and there can be hope,” says Christine Sebastian, Kicks For Kids program director. “A lot of the kids are homeless—maybe one parent’s in jail; maybe they’re in foster care—it gives them some sense of feeling loved.”
 
After joining a chaperone to engage in a community service project—everything from making cards for children spending their holiday season in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to preparing a meal for the elderly—more than 50 youth from Greater Cincinnati join together at Paul Brown Stadium for the celebration.
 
“It’s all decorated, their chaperones are waiting, they get paired up and have dinner, the Christmas story is read, and they go down to the Bengals locker room and tour that,” Sebastian says.
 
But the real fun begins when the children enter the visitors’ locker room to find their names on a locker filled with things like school supplies, a new winter coat, a personalized Bengals jersey and a football.
 
“Then they get to run out on the field and the Ben-Gals are there, waving their pompoms, and they run through it and down the field,” Sebastian says. “They go up and meet Santa, who calls them by name and talks to them, then brings out their presents—Bengals players help,” Sebastian says.
 
In addition to receiving, students have the opportunity to go to Santa’s workshop, where they pick out presents for their family members.
 
“A lot of letters they write to Santa—they’ll ask for something for their sister or brother or mother—one little girl asked for a bathrobe for her grandmother because she was sick,” Sebastian says. “It makes them feel good they’re able to give something.” 

Do Good:

•    Support Kicks For Kids by donating.

•    Contact Christine if you'd like to help make the event possible. Volunteer chaperones, shoppers, and gift wrappers are needed.

•    Connect with Kicks For Kids on Facebook
 

Cincinnati YMCAs aim to strengthen global community

In 2013, the YMCA of the USA, in cooperation with 40 different YMCA associations across the country, came up with a plan to expand efforts of global community building.
 
Now, one year later, the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati—one of the 40 associations involved in Y-USA’s efforts—is doing its part in the local community to ”create, strengthen and replicate innovative global services, partnerships and organizational practices at home and abroad” through its Global Center of Excellence.
 
“We really want to connect with our neighbors in our community in a much stronger way,” says Karyl Cunningham, executive director of the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati. “In a changing community, changing world, the Y’s mission has always been a movement about embracing people from different backgrounds and ethnicities, and supporting movements that are critical for the greater good of society.”
 
At the Clippard Y, which Cunningham says is one of the most “ethnically diverse” of Cincinnati’s 14 branches, members are gearing up for the Taste of the World tailgating event, where individuals bring in their favorite meal or dish to share with one another while engaging in conversation and watching football together.
 
“There’s going to be some learning opportunities that take place, and it should be a really great thing,” Cunningham says. “And as we move forward, we’re always going to have global community as a basic premise, so the Global Center of Excellence is one of those ways to keep that front and center for the work we do.” 

Do Good:

•    Support the Clippard Family YMCA by attending the Taste of the World tailgating event Nov. 16 from 12-3 p.m. The event is $10 per family or $5 per individual, and all proceeds help the Y further its mission. 

•    Learn about joining the Y

•    Support the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati by giving.
 

Photos at Skirball reveal history, transition of Cincinnati's West End

Sixty black-and-white photographs documenting the architecture, history and human experience of Cincinnati’s West End in the early-mid 20th century, are on display at Skirball Museum.
 
George Rosenthal, Daniel Ransohoff and Ben Rosen: Documenting Cincinnati’s Neighborhoods, which is part of FotoFocus, opened late last month, though photos remain on exhibit through December 21. And this Wednesday, community members are invited to a panel discussion with historians, scholars and community partners who are knowledgeable about the West End.
 
“The panel provides an opportunity to engage with people who have studied the West End, lived in the West End, written about the West End,” says Abby Schwartz, director of Skirball Museum and curator of the exhibition. “We hope to engage with these experts about the history of the neighborhood and the lessons we can learn from its demise, as well as have the opportunity to hear from those who knew the photographers whose works are in the exhibition.”
 
According to Schwartz, the photos on display tell a story about the “plight of urban neighborhoods” during times of transition.
 
“In the case of the West End, what was promised as urban revitalization really turned out to be a terrible chapter in the city's history, resulting in the destruction of an entire neighborhood and displacement of its inhabitants,” Schwartz says. “I think it presents an opportunity to think about what could have been done differently, and provides lessons going forward.” 

Do Good:

•    Attend Wednesday's panel discussion at 7 p.m. 

•    Check out the exhibition at Skirball Museum. Hours are here.

•    Check out other exhibitions that are part of FotoFocus Biennial 2014.
 

Permaganic Co.'s Eco Garden provides youth with purposeful engagement in OTR

Permaganic Co.’s youth internship program, in which inner city youth between the ages of 12 and 18 engage in the “maintenance, sales and planning” of the nonprofit’s Eco Garden in Over-the-Rhine, is invaluable, according to Bryna Bass, friend of the garden.
 
Bass has volunteered with the program and served as Permaganic Co.’s board chair; and the Eco Garden—aside from being a “beautiful place,” she says—holds value for young people in that it merges job readiness, financial literacy, art, science, service learning and agriculture all into one.
 
“Not only do the kids come in and work, but they’re also learning. There’s a lot of soft skills that are being embedded and learned at the same time,” Bass says. “And the kids come from different neighborhoods—some of them know each other, some don’t—but they’ve got to figure out how to work together.”
 
Bass currently serves as program manager for Rothenberg Preparatory Academy’s rooftop school garden, so students—many whom are also familiar with Permaganic Co.’s Eco Garden because of its proximity to home and school—are constantly sharing their enthusiasm.
 
“I hear from them all the time just how excited they are that someday they could possibly work there,” Bass says. “So when they’re 10 and 11, they want to be able to work in the Eco Garden. It’s a place that they articulate and are able to say they feel safe and good about themselves in, and they feel productive there.” 

Do Good:

•    Support youth interns' work by becoming a Permaganic Co. customer

•    Volunteer with Permaganic Co. 

•    Support Permaganic Co. by donating. 
 

Contractors form alliance to serve nonprofits

Jeff Wilmink, contractor with Century Mechanical Solutions, founded Mechanical Optimizers, because he says he recognized nonprofits would save money in the long-run if they were more aware of their maintenance and repair needs.
 
“They keep having all these emergency repairs, and I think a big part of it is no one’s giving them a plan on what they need to be doing,” Wilmink says.
 
So Century Mechanical Solutions teamed up with seven other local contracting agencies to form Mechanical Optimizers, which, according to the organization’s website, is an alliance that helps others assess, forecast and budget for both current and future needs.
 
“They’re kind of sitting there, and all of a sudden, the bomb drops,” Wilmink says. “And they didn’t even understand there was a bomb in the basement.”
 
Contractors provide nonprofits with free assessments by developing a report that details the most cost-efficient solutions, then assist the organization in finding potential donors so they can avoid emergency repairs, which are often more costly.
 
Mechanical Optimizers just launched at the beginning of September, and though Wilmink says he doesn’t know exactly where this is all going, he needs to be proactive.
 
“Being proactive—that’s the whole point,” Wilmink says. “I don’t know who I can help, but the eight of us work together on projects already, so we wanted to say, ‘Hey, OK, if you need help, we’re here to help get you to this stage.’” 

Do Good:

•    Contact Mechanical Optimizers if you're a nonprofit that wants to be proactive about repairs and maintenance. 

•    Support local nonprofits by donating. 

•    Volunteer your time to help local nonprofits. 
 

First Impact Covington Day hailed a success

More than 200 volunteers came together last Saturday on Make a Difference Day—a national day of giving—to better the City of Covington.
 
It was the first of six Impact Covington days, which COV200—the group tasked with planning the city’s Bicentennial Celebration—initiated.
 
“We want to instill pride in the community,” says Amanda Greenwell, vice chair for the bicentennial. “And we think the best way to do that is for people to actually take part and make it a better place.”
 
The committee is now accepting applications for the second Impact Day, which will take place December 13.
 
“If an organization wants to do whatever—beautification, public art, social services—we have a database of volunteers and a pretty big network of people who say they want to get involved and give back,” Greenwell says.
 
This past weekend, volunteers did everything from painting to landscaping, but the next Impact Covington Day will deal specifically with work completed at social service organizations throughout the city.
 
“These events are great opportunities to actually meet your neighbors and get engaged with your community,” Greenwell says.
 
“Today with the digital age we’re in, people are really disconnected with our neighbors, so through the Bicentennial and all the events, we’re hoping to bring the community together as one to meet their neighbors and understand more about the city and the organizations that make it a better place.”
 
Do Good:

•    Submit your Impact Covington Day application by November 10 if you're a nonprofit in need. 

•    Attend one of the hundreds of events planned for Covington's Bicentennial Celebration.

•    Sign up to volunteer with COV200.


 

NEW Cincinnati hosts Julie Foudy, promotes leadership, mentorship opps for students

Cincinnati’s Network of Executive Women hosted Julie Foudy, former captain of the U.S. Women’s National Team, this past Thursday in an effort to inspire its members, supporters and individuals in its College Outreach Program to be effective leaders.
 
“People would say, ‘You’re crazy. You can’t do that. You’re never going to be in a woman’s world—never going to be in the Olympics—women’s soccer isn’t going to be in the Olympics,’” Foudy says.
 
“But with courage and conviction—as a group—to see how powerful it is, and if you can come together for a common goal and support each other and rely on each other—I always say the magic happens outside your comfort zone.”
 
That was just a portion of the advice Foudy offered to 600 men and women from the consumer products and retail industry, who also had the opportunity to network with one another at the event.
 
Through the College Outreach Program, students are paired with mentors already in the industry, who can introduce them to others and provide them with valuable advice to help them succeed in their future careers.
 
For Foudy, mentorship is invaluable.
 
“Having that type of presence in your life—that’s everything,” Foudy says. “So that they’re taking the time to do that, I just love, because for young women in particular, you need to see it—to see there are women doing it all, who are successful, who have a family and who are able to get it done—because that can be an intimidating thing when you get older.”

Do Good:

•    Connect with NEW Cincinnati on Facebook.

•    Get involved with NEW Cincinnati and its College Outreach Program.

•    Learn about NEW benefits, and consider membership.
 

Kennedy Heights Arts Center to undergo expansion, provide more to local arts scene

It’s been a decade now since residents came together in an effort to save what was a crumbling, historic structure, slated for demolition, and which now houses the Kennedy Heights Arts Center.
 
Now, 10 years later, an even bigger transformation will occur, as the Arts Center breaks ground November 14 on construction for its second location and regional campus—the Kennedy Heights Arts Center Carl, Robert, Richard and Dorothy Lindner Annex
 
When completed next year, the building will allow the Arts Center to expand its offerings to the community in a variety of ways.
 
“In the Annex, we’ll have a multipurpose events center which will be home to different kinds of performing arts programs in theater, music and dance, and we’ll have a venue for classes and workshops,” says Ellen Muse-Lindeman, KHAC executive director.
 
“We’ll also be creating the Scripps Howard Media Center, which will allow us to expand our already popular arts education programs to offer classes in digital-based art—so, photography, video, animation, web design, graphic design and the like.”
 
There will also be space for 10 individual studios, which Muse-Lindeman says artists may choose to rent, providing them a space to work, which strengthens the arts community in the region.
 
The Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus will also house the Kennedy Heights Montessori Center, and it contains enough space for a third institution, as well.
 
“We see this as the crossroads—the core of our community—as it’s revitalized in this way,” Muse-Lindeman says. “It continues to bring a more positive image to the neighborhood, it attracts more people with it being a regional destination, and it encourages more development—more on neighboring properties—and we see this as being a catalyzing project that has lots of benefits in terms of all the services we’ll be bringing to residents.” 

Do Good: 

•    Celebrate the Arts Center's expansion by attending the November 14 groundbreaking.

•    Check out the Arts Center's various programs, and consider participating in one.

•    Learn about the various ways you can support the Arts Center.
 

United Way seeks volunteers to assist families with tax prep

Tax season is quickly approaching, and because the United Way of Greater Cincinnati recognizes it can sometimes be a stressful time for hardworking families, it’s seeking volunteers who can commit to helping those families file for free.
 
Last year, at more than 30 locations across Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, 753 volunteers prepared nearly 20,00 tax returns, which provided about $21 million in refunds, and the goal this year is to have just as big—if not more—of an impact.
 
“We want people to avoid the predatory practices out there, in addition to the unnecessary fees,” says Lucy Crane, director of community impact at UWGC. “We also want to make sure they claim all the tax credits they’re entitled to.”
 
It’s not just beneficial for the families receiving tax prep, though, Crane says. The volunteers, who become IRS tax-trained and certified, learn a beneficial skill as well.
 
“I think it’s a unique opportunity, because how often do you hear about volunteering to do people’s taxes?” Crane says. “You’re interacting with people and being of assistance to them in a way that’s very concrete, and at the end of the day, you know clearly how they felt.”
 
When tax credits sometimes account for $1,000, Crane says the impact can be huge.
 
“We survey our filers and we ask them how they’re going use their refunds, and most of them use it to pay down bills—so it could be a student loan, a grocery bill, helping to pay rent—and about 10 percent use it for some kind of savings—for a car—or a lot of time, it’s for their kids,” Crane says. “They’re really grateful, and they come back year after year because they really depend on it and trust us.” 

Do Good:

•    Volunteer to commit to working at least 12 hours this tax season.

•    If you need assistance with tax prep, learn where to go to get help.

•    If you earn less than $58,000 annually, and you'd rather do your taxes on your own, file for free here.
 

Peaslee Neighborhood Center celebrates 30 years of community impact

In December 1984, a group of women—mostly composed of single moms—received keys to the former Peaslee School in Over-the-Rhine, after having led fundraising efforts to ensure their children access to quality education.

“They didn’t know where their positive steps would go, or how far that would extend for people in this community, but they just did it anyway and that’s inspiring to me,” says Jennifer Summers, executive director of Peaslee Neighborhood Center.
 
“It’s a narrative that’s not a typical narrative of low income people in our community, and that motivates me to make sure that there are consistently spaces in this community that are accessible to everybody across all types of backgrounds.”
 
Now, 30 years later, Peaslee is celebrating its space in the community that demonstrates how far the women’s positive reach has extended, in creating "a peaceful place,” where everyone in OTR is welcome and can learn from and through one another.
 
One of its particularly successful programs, and one that Summers says shows the ways in which social change is at work, is its community education partnership with the Miami University Urban Teaching Cohort.
 
“It brings people from the community—moms, volunteers, recent graduates of Cincinnati Public Schools—together to help educate young, new, potential teachers on the things they can’t learn in a book about teaching,” Summers says.
 
“So the college students see community members on a regular basis, and those relationships are formed over five or six years, so by the time that student is teaching in the local school here, they have a network of support so they can support the students in their classroom in a way that makes sense to them, that honors their experience and that is effective.”
 
One way relationships are formed is through bonding activities like quilting and storytelling.
 
“People connect across generations,” Summers says.
 
“You can’t create any kind of change collectively unless you can get comfortable enough with each other and comfortable enough to do challenging things together, and I feel like we’re leaning into that. We’re promoting basic enrichment and educational services to the community, and we’re reaching beyond that to say, ‘How do we build a world we don’t just function and survive in, but that everybody thrives in, so that our successes are tied together?'” 

Do Good: 

•    Help Peaslee celebrate 30 years by attending Peaslee Presents: A Place for Everybody on November 6.

•    If you're interested in putting together a team from your workplace or community group, volunteer to complete a project for Peaslee. 

•    Support Peaslee by donating.
 

SVP to host bigger, better Fast Pitch this year

Social Venture Partners Cincinnati will once again host its Fast Pitch competition, where local nonprofits will deliver their pitches in an attempt to attain grant money to put toward funding their missions.
 
Last year, three grantees were awarded prize money, which totaled $7,500; but this year, there is more support and, therefore, larger prizes—and more of them.
 
“You could win up to $16,000 if you do a sweep,” says Joan Kaup, executive director of SVP Cincinnati. “So, there’s $27,500 right now, but doesn’t $30,000 just sound better? I haven’t given up yet.”
 
Fast Pitch, which is modeled on a technique introduced in the venture capital and startup community, is an idea that prompts organizations to learn their story and figure out an effective way to share it.
 
“So the goal is to initially accept 20 [nonprofits] and invite them to training, and that’s all about, ‘What is your message? What is your key story?’” Kaup says. “And then those 20 will get a practice round with the Partners, who will narrow it down to eight; and those then get a training focused on, ‘Now that you know your story, how are you going to deliver it in a way that is creative, compelling and concise?”
 
SVP Cincinnati will match each organization with mentors and coaches who will work with one another for several weeks leading up to the February 11 event.
 
This year’s theme is Innovation that Matters, and the competition is open to all area nonprofits.
 
“What are the really wicked, sticky issues we’re dealing with in today’s society, and how are we going to bust that right open and take care of it?” Kaup says. “So we’re asking them to come forward with their innovative solutions that will make a difference to Greater Cincinnati. It could be children, animals, environment—I don’t want to put a fence around it—it’s wide open.”
 
Perhaps most exciting is that this year’s winner will also have the chance to compete on a national level in September 2015, as eight different SVP affiliates host this type of competition throughout the U.S.
 
“So we’re going to come together and have a national competition, which is just great for building capacity—it’s that much more exposure, that much more awareness,” Kaup says. “It will be about, ‘What is that nonprofit doing, what is the mission, the activity, how is the organization making an impact in the community, and can it be scaled to other communities? It’s exposure to what will be national funders and foundations, so the opportunity is pretty big for them.” 

Do Good:

•    If you're a nonprofit, apply for Fast Pitch prior to the November 1 deadline. 

•    Contact Joan Kaup if you're interested in sponsoring the event and helping the organization reach the $30,000 mark.

•    Save the date, and contact Joan to be put on the event's waiting list so you're first to know when tickets are available for purchase. 
 

HUC-JIR celebrates interfaith harmony, honors former prof

Lowell McCoy learned the importance of connecting with others through shared values at a young age.
 
McCoy, 95, began his career as a chaplain in the U.S. Army during World War II, then served several Methodist congregations prior to joining the University of Cincinnati and The Ohio State University’s speech departments.
 
In 1940, McCoy was tasked with helping Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion set up a speech program of its own; he then joined the faculty and taught rabbinical students the art of effective oration for 50 years.
 
According to Hebrew Union College representatives, there are no other known cases of Christian ministers training rabbis; and to honor his impact and to promote interfaith harmony, the institution has created an award in his honor.
 
The McCoy Prize in Interfaith Relations was awarded for the first time at this year’s graduation ceremonies, and it will be highlighted at the college’s 31st annual Cincinnati Associates Tribute Dinner Sunday.
 
“Throughout his career, Lowell endeavored always to build bridges of understanding and friendship between people of diverse religious and cultural backgrounds,” HUC-JIR said, when announcing the prize.
 
It's for that reason, says Rabbi David Whiman—who was ordained by HUC-JIR in 1979—that an award be named in Lowell’s honor. “Lowell’s gentle manner, kind and caring heart, and commitment to interfaith understanding and love for Reform Judaism make this prize an apt tribute.” 

Do Good:

•    Support HUC-JIR by donating.

•    Call 513-487-3047 if you're interested in attending Sunday's dinner. 

•    Connect with HUC-JIR on Facebook.
 

GiveCamp provides nearly 200K in website redesigns, apps for area nonprofits

Seventy-eight volunteer developers, database administrators and designers came together for Southwest Ohio GiveCamp this weekend, and as a result, 13 nonprofits came away with things like free website redesigns and cell phone applications.
 
Volunteers donated about 1,940 hours of their time to produce final products equating to about $194,000 in value.
 
“The nonprofits couldn’t do this on their own,” says Eric Schwartz, who has helped organize the event for the past five years. “It works out every year to be usually $14,000 of labor for each nonprofit if they were to pay to do it on their own, and we get it done in 2.5 days.”
 
According to one of the nonprofits, calculations indicate their project would have actually cost around $33,000, so $14,000 is conservative, Schwartz says.
 
This year, there was also a children's code camp, which took place Saturday afternoon.
 
“It’s good for us as parents—your kids are going to learn what you do for a job,” Schwartz says. “And you’re starting to teach the next generation of kids to do this.”
 
The best thing about the weekend, Schwartz says, was seeing nonprofit representatives hanging around with the team of volunteers working on their projects.
 
“Those are the most successful projects—where they work alongside each other, get to know how to work it and provide feedback,” Schwartz says. “And at the end, it’s just great to see their eyes light up when they see this brand new thing.” 

Do Good:

•    Connect with Southwest Ohio GiveCamp on Facebook.

•    Once you connect with the organization, learn about its volunteer-needs so you can help SWOGC help even more nonprofits next year.

•    Check out SWOGC's portfolio of work.
 
305 talent Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts