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Talent : For Good

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Impact 100 member grows, spreads philanthropic values to young members

Emily Throckmorton learned the value of philanthropy at a young age.
 
At age 18, she’s the youngest member of Impact 100, a group of women who work collectively to make a difference in the community by pooling funds to award significant grants to nonprofits.
 
Last year, the organization was able to provide Crayons to Computers and Easter Seals TriState | Building Value with $108,000 grants; and this year, membership has grown, so three nonprofits will receive $109,000 grants.
 
“You’re basically putting your faith in these organizations and choosing who you want to help and how you want to help them, and the whole experience is amazing,” says Throckmorton, who’s received membership as a gift for the past two years.
 
Throckmorton just began her freshman year at Purdue University, so as a college freshman, and certainly as a high school student, contributing to a philanthropic organization isn’t always financially feasible. But in Throckmorton’s case, her membership has been a much better gift than any material possessions could have been.
 
“This is something I will continue, not just at school, but through the rest of my life,” Throckmorton says. “Seeing the money they had spent the whole year raising going toward these amazing causes—I really want to stay involved and help out doing something like this because I love helping others.” 

Do Good:

•    Check out this year's five grant finalists, and attend the Annual Awards Celebration September 16 when this year's recipients will be announced. 

•    Help Impact 100 continue to grow. The organization is always looking for new members, particularly young professionals, so it can sustain itself and further its community impact for years to come. Consider joining.

•    If you're a nonprofit, learn about how to apply for next year's grant, and stay connected with the organization through Facebook to keep up with the latest news and updates.
 

Top female chefs, local creatives join forces to benefit YWCA

Frannie Kroner’s longtime dream has been to host a collaborative dinner with Greater Cincinnati’s top female chefs, and this Sunday, she’ll have that opportunity.
 
“There really aren’t that many in comparison to male chefs, and I’ve always really admired the lineup we’ve had in this city,” Kroner says. “And I wanted to be more of a part of that community and try to bring everyone together, because this doesn’t happen very often.”
 
Kroner serves as executive chef at Sleepy Bee Café, where the event Showcase: Dinner for a Cause, which will benefit the YWCA’s Battered Women’s Shelter, will take place.

“It’s always been in the back of my mind to try to do more philanthropic things with food, because on a day-to-day basis, in a restaurant setting, you’re usually catering to people that can afford to come to the restaurant,” Kroner says. “So it’s nice to feel like you can give back to the community in a way that it’s still done through your craft.”
 
Ten chefs will collaborate on Sunday’s multi-course dinner, while female performing artists will provide entertainment. The evening’s table centerpieces— sculptures created through a collaborative effort with Brazee Street Studios’ C-LINK Presents: Showcase: Female Artists for a Cause—will be auctioned off as well.
 
Though proceeds from the event will benefit the YWCA, Kroner says she is looking forward to the event because it won’t necessarily feel like a fundraiser so much as it will be a celebration of the local talent that female creatives have to offer.
 
“Just bringing the female creative force all in one room—that’s always been something that in theory sounds super inspirational—and I can’t wait to be part of that group and feel the energy,” Kroner says. “We’re all going to be orchestrating together in the back as we prepare, and there aren’t that many female chefs, but I think that in general, it’s an underutilized group of people.” 

Do Good:

•    Reserve your spot at Showcase: Dinner for a Cause.

•    Support the YWCA by donating.

•    Volunteer with the YWCA.


 

Rosie's Girls empowers girls with STEM-related skills

For Sandra Ramirez Pvac, a freshman at DePaul Cristo Rey High School, the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati’s program Rosie’s Girls provided her not only with a fun and engaging summer experience, but also a sense of empowerment.
 
“We made lamps, cut the pieces, sanded it and painted it,” Ramirez Pvac says. “Then we also got it to work through the electricity that we did. We also made our own toolbox—it was just cool.”
 
Rosie’s Girls is a program for girls between the ages of 11 and 13 that introduces STEM-related careers through hands-on training in carpentry and other technical trades.
 
“The part that excited me was going through carpentry, because usually when I hear about Messer and Turner Construction sites, usually men do it,” Ramirez Pvac says. “You see guys outside putting concrete on the streets, so I thought it would be interesting to go and experience that and see how it is.”
 
Ramirez Pvac actually graduated from the program in 2012, but this past summer, she returned as a counselor in training.
 
“I was excited because my younger sister was going this year, and she also was excited because she saw the stuff I had brought home,” Ramirez Pvac says.
 
Since her time in the program, Ramirez Pvac has been able to put her skills to use. When her bed broke, she fixed it. And when she was on a mission trip working in the garden of an older couple, she noticed a broken bench that was going to be thrown away.
 
“It was a pretty bench,” Ramirez Pvac says. “And they said they just hadn’t found someone who could fix it, so I got the opportunity to get the tools and fix it.”
 
Rosie’s Girls fostered a sense of independence in Ramirez Pvac, and it’s one she says she noticed with the other girls who participated in the program this past July.
 
“They were able to do the stuff themselves. They were able to have confidence by being able to do stuff that you wouldn’t see a young girl doing at this age,” Ramirez Pvac says. “And I feel like some girls actually felt like they wanted to take a career that has to do with that, with carpentry.”

Do Good:

•    Learn about Rosie's Girls, and encourage young girls to apply for next year's program. 

•    Support the YWCA by donating.

•    Connect with Rosie's Girls on Facebook.

Local man leads nation in library service advancements for blind

Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired’s Chris Mundy joins the ranks of individuals like text-to-speech innovator Ray Kurzweil as the 48th recipient of the Francis Joseph Campbell Award.
 
The award recognizes institutions or individuals who have made “an outstanding contribution to the advancement of library service for the blind and physically handicapped.”
 
Mundy serves as quality assurance specialist for network-produced recordings at Mutlistate Center East, a division of Clovernook, as he works to improve the quality of—and expand upon the availability of—audio materials available to library patrons who cannot read print.
 
“My position’s unique, and it’s the only one in the U.S. that works directly with volunteer programs to get the material to a particular quality level,” Mundy says. “And what’s really cool is all the people that get involved—a lot of them are retirees with a background in dramatic arts or broadcasting and are capable of handling really difficult material.”
 
As Mundy travels around the country to the National Library Service volunteer studios, he assists in the behind-the-scenes production that allows for continuity of sound and quality for the various materials available.
 
“There’s a revolving door of volunteers—maybe 10 narrators involved in a typical issue of Smithsonian magazine, for example—and the whole key is, over time, the staff and volunteers involved with it are constantly changing,” Mundy says. “Plus, the technology changes. I learn it and impart some of that knowledge to them.”
 
Mundy says he’s humbled to be a recipient of the award, but he’d like for more individuals to take advantage of the resources he helps make available.
 
“At any given moment, 900,000-1 million people are currently using it (the Braille and Audio Reading service), but there are 3 million who are eligible for it,” Mundy says. “So roughly 2 million don’t know they can access it with a doctor’s note. There’s just so many people in everyday life who might really benefit from knowing about it.”

Do Good: 

•    Connect with Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired on Facebook.

•    If you know someone who could benefit from services offered through the BARD, help them apply.

•    Support Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired.
 

CYC grad shows fortitude through adverse situations

Withrow International High School graduate Niyubahwe Dieudonne is familiar with transitions.
 
He’ll begin his studies at the University of Cincinnati in August, and in early October, at the Cincinnati Youth Collaborative’s 11th annual Dream Makers Celebration, he’ll find out whether or not he’s the recipient of the Outstanding Student Award and a $1,000 scholarship.
 
Dieudonne was nominated for the award because of his success and perseverance through a time in his life that was by no means easy.
 
“I moved from East Africa from a small country called Burundi in 2007,” Dieudonne says. “It was really hard for me, because I didn’t know any English when I came, so it was really hard going to school here.”
 
In the sixth grade, Dieudonne enrolled at the Academy of World Languages, where he participated in English as a Second Language classes; and during his freshman year of high school, he became involved with the CYC.
 
“It was good because it gave me the experience of having a mentor,” Dieudonne says. “And the mentor would always stay in touch with us, help us with our school work—whatever we needed, they were there for us—they’d always make sure we were doing the best we can.”
 
Coming to a new country that he knew nothing about and essentially having to “start over” was the hardest thing Dieudonne says he’s ever experienced. And though he’s overcome that obstacle, he says he still struggles.
 
“Especially when I’m starting college right now,” Dieudonne says. “But I’m planning on going to UC to study biology. But moving here has inspired me to do my best and to not be afraid of challenges that life gives me.” 

Do Good:

•    Connect with CYC on Facebook, and attend the Dream Makers Celebration October 2 at Music Hall

•    Volunteer as a CYC mentor.

•    Support the CYC by making a gift.

Price Hill sports painter assists nonprofits by donating artwork

It was around the age of 7 that local artist Chris Felix says he drew a picture of his dog that impressed his mother and others.
 
“This sparked my interest in drawing more,” Felix says. “And I started taking some lessons from a cousin of mine who was an art teacher.”
 
Felix’s work has evolved over the years, and a primary area of focus for him now is sports paintings—everything from portraits of Reds players to landscapes of golf courses.
 
“As projects arise, I research my subjects by scouring books in the library, images on Google, and asking around at memorabilia shops for pertinent material relating to my subject,” Felix says.
 
He photographs his subjects and backgrounds for points of reference then gets to work, but the process doesn’t stop there.
 
Felix, who grew up in Price Hill and who has lived in Cincinnati his entire life, has a passion not only for art, but also for his city and those who inhabit it.
 
So he makes it a point to use his paintings and prints to give back.
 
Since the late '90s, Felix has donated an original and more than 20 prints per year, on average, to organizations like the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Reid Rizzo Foundation, the Bethany House Shelter and others, to assist with nonprofits’ missions of propelling the community forward.
 
“Helping others is something I love to do,” Felix says. “The impact is nothing but positive. I believe that we get back more than what we ever give.” 

Do Good:

•    Support Felix by checking out his art and sharing it with others. 

•    Connect with Felix on Facebook.

•    Look for Felix's art around town at places like the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Muesum, Art on the Levee, the Cincinnati Mueseum Center and Heirloom Framing Co.

 

Bengals tailgating sparks idea for new nonprofit

Jason Chapman says he remembers tailgating at the Bengals-Steelers Monday Night Football matchup last September like it was yesterday—and not just because it was a Cincinnati win against a top-rival.
 
He remembers it because it was the start of something bigger and more meaningful than he says he’d ever imagined.
 
“It just so happened that all day that day, I wound up helping people in small ways—giving money here and there— and I didn’t put two and two together,” Chapman says.
 
“But before the game, as we were tailgating, we saw onlookers outside the gate, and some people looked like they could have been less fortunate than myself and some of the other partygoers.”
 
So Chapman and his friends offered food to those who stood outside, and his act of kindness soon became contagious.
 
The desire to help others spread not only to the other tailgaters that evening, but also to Chapman’s friends and followers across social networks and across the country.
 
“We had enormous support from friends and followers who were willing to donate the next time we were downtown tailgating—or just anything we were willing to do—they were ready and willing to give,” Chapman says.
 
So The Midwest Project, a nonprofit for which Chapman is president and co-founder, was born.
 
The organization works by utilizing social media to raise awareness and funds for things like education, health and wellness, and nonviolence.
 
“It made me think about how I have a tremendous support team and some influence in my city and community,” Chapman says. “So why don’t we start a nonprofit so we can build on that, and that’s kind of how it started.” 

Do Good:

•    Check out The Midwest Project's website, and tell your friends.

•    Connect with the organization on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for updates.

•    Support The Midwest Project by donating or volunteering.

 

Cincinnati State's 1 Night, 12 Kitchens sets fundraising record

The Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State raised more than $100,000 dollars at this year’s 10th annual 1 Night, 12 Kitchens event.
 
1 Night, 12 Kitchens is a celebration of Greater Cincinnati’s culinary delights and a way for some of the region’s best chefs—many of whom are graduates of Cincinnati State’s Midwest Culinary Institute—to share their talents with the public. 
 
“The event really demonstrates how amazing our restaurant and hospitality industry is, and how critical Midwest Culinary Institute is,” says Elliott Ruther, Cincinnati State’s chief of development. “Over 90 percent of our graduates remain in the area, and this is just an incredible experience—seeing the scene as it continues to grow.”
 
About 600 individuals came together, either to sample various dishes or to sponsor the event and students attending the Midwest Culinary Institute.
 
Ruther said the great food alone made the event a success, but the money raised for student scholarships is what’s most important.
 
“The top chefs are there working with our students and alums—some of which are both,” Ruther says. “And they talk about hiring students. There’s a strong interest in getting students to the scholarships to really help provide opportunities for them to take in a really good program.”

Do Good:

•    Support Midwest Culinary Institute students by dining at The Summit

•    Support Cincinnati State students by giving.

•    Learn about MCI's programs and courses.

CSYO provides networking, friendship, engagement to youth

Jackie Tso, a senior at Sycamore High School and concertmaster for the Cincinnati Symphony Youth Orchestra has been playing violin for 13 years.
 
“My brother and my mom each played together when we were younger, and when I was about two, I would always go to pick up my brother’s violin and try to play it,” Tso says.
 
“And so my mom thought it’d be nice to start me on violin because I’d always showed a passion for it, so I started with the Suzuki training method when I was four.”
 
Tso just wrapped up her final concert with the CSYO as first violinist, and her time with the orchestra is something she says she’ll never forget.
 
“I’ve really just learned so much about orchestra and being a leader,” Tso says. “It’s been a blessing. I’ve developed friendships that are real friendships, and they’ll continue after high school.”
 
Tso has played with the CSYO for the past four years, and during that time, she’s had opportunities to play solos in front of large audiences and to perform alongside members of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.
 
“I’ve learned a lot from sitting next to a professional, and playing solo with that orchestra is so cool,” Tso says. “Just to have a huge orchestra behind you—double the size of a normal one—it’s just so powerful and a good feeling as well.” 

Do Good:

•    Learn about, and consider auditioning for the CSYO.

•    Support the CSO and its programs. 

•    Connect with the CSYO on Facebook.

Young Professionals' Choral Collective continues venture as it transitions to nonprofit

About three and a half years ago, the Young Professionals’ Choral Collective hosted its first rehearsal, and about 35 singers showed up; but for the past two years, the organization has been going strong, says KellyAnn Nelson, managing artistic director.
 
“We’re at over 350 singers on our roster,” Nelson says. “It’s grown much faster than we expected it to.”
 
The yp/CC is a growing organization that funds itself through donations and ticket sales, but it’s currently in the process of transitioning into the nonprofit sector.
 
“We realized it’s bigger than one person’s business.” Nelson says. “Part of our mission is that we’re not only a choir that makes music, but that we’re creating connections with local businesses, local arts organizations, and we have this triangle in addition to being a performing arts organization.”
 
On any given rehearsal night, you could find about 60 singers in what Nelson refers to as a “nontraditional space” (this cycle, it’s at Japp’s) where yp/CC members patronize local establishments by purchasing cocktails before and after rehearsals.
 
As the organization evolves and begins to form its own nonprofit board, Nelson says she hopes it encourages yp/CC singers to go out into the local arts community and support and serve on other boards as well, to further the community relationships the organization continues to build upon.
 
The model has been so successful to this point that Nelson says other cities have reached out to her about creating similar ventures in their own spaces.
 
“I’m just so curious to see if this project is so successful because it’s just in people’s hearts and souls that they want to sing, and want to sing in a social, fun and accessible way, and that works everywhere—or if there’s something truly special about Cincinnati—that people just flock to this idea in a totally unexpected way,” Nelson says. “So that’s an interesting part of our experiment right now.” 

Do Good:

•    Support the yp/CC in its second annual crowdfunding campaign by helping the organization reach its $5,000 dollar goal by May 23.

•    Attend the yp/CC's spring concert May 20 at Rhinegeist Brewery.

•    Join the yp/CC and sing.

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia.

Princeton High School represents Greater Cincinnati in national competition

The Greater Cincinnati World Affairs Council is in need of funding for its global education programs, which help the organization further its mission of “promoting international understanding, education, engagement and cooperation.”
 
One of the programs—Global Classrooms, for example, pairs international students from the University of Cincinnati with local school districts—so Greater Cincinnati’s youth can begin learning about other nations’ cultures and people.
 
“It’s an opportunity for the students to become those global citizens we’re trying to bring in to the world,” says Michelle Harpenau, GCWAC’s executive director.
 
Perhaps the most popular global education program the nonprofit offers, however, is Academic WorldQuest, which is an international trivia competition for high school students.
 
GCWAC partnered with the Cincinnati Museum Center earlier this year to host 11 teams from six different schools, as each competed for a spot in the national competition.
 
Princeton High School won the local competition and traveled to the nation’s capital to represent Greater Cincinnati in the World Affairs Councils of America’s large-scale event this past April.
 
“You can explore D.C. with that international twist,” Harpenau says.
 
The four student representatives finished in eighth place out of nearly 50 teams and had the opportunity to not only compete by offering their new knowledge of things like current events and cybersecurity, but to see our nation’s current and historical landmarks and even meet Singapore’s ambassador to the U.S.
 
“It speaks to our tagline—explore, experience and engage your world,” Harpenau says. “And it’s so important because we’re one local Council, but these issues are not just affecting us—they’re affecting the nation and the world.” 

Do Good: 

•    Support the GCWAC.

•    Join the GCWAC.

•    Like the GCWAC on Facebook.

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia.

ESCC celebrates National Volunteer Week

In recognition of National Volunteer Week, which was celebrated last month, Executive Service Corps of Cincinnati honored four of its top volunteers.
 
ESCC volunteers provide consulting services to area nonprofits by applying their skills and knowledge from the workforce to the not-for-profit sector.
 
For Bob Conklin, Procter & Gamble retiree and one of the four individuals recognized, volunteering with ESCC is a meaningful endeavor because it gives him a chance to continue to apply his knowledge in an environment that’s not money-driven.
 
“Many of the nonprofits are small organizations, staffed by people who have a tremendous passion for whatever service they’re doing,” Conklin says.
 
Conklin has assisted a variety of nonprofits, but his favorite task was supervising construction of the new Scout Achievement Center, he says.
 
“The Boy Scouts had no one who had project-management, design and construction experience, so I was able to help interpret for the architect what was needed and help on a day-to-day basis with decision-making,” Conklin says.
 
“No matter what’s designed, there are always things that are encountered in construction where plans have to be changed, and so I was able to bring the technical and project manager expertise to that to give them guidance.”
 
Conklin spent about 20 hours a week volunteering with the Boy Scouts’ project, which he says was at times challenging, but incredibly rewarding.
 
“There is such an overwhelming need with nonprofits, but they typically don’t have time or the structure behind them to work on developing things like, ‘How do I manage an organization? ‘How do I recruit people? How do I set up a financial system?’” Conklin says. “So what we can do is to provide some advice, assistance and training that really helps them be more effective at delivering their mission.” 

Do Good:

•    Contact ESCC if you're a nonprofit with a request for assistance

•    Volunteer with ESCC.

•    Support ESCC by donating.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 

State Farm and Economics Center partner to deliver financial literacy to 1,500 students

The Money Savvy Kids program will equip 50 area teachers with the resources to bring financial literacy into the classroom to 1,500 elementary students.
 
State Farm has partnered with the Economics Center to provide this program to teachers by creating a curriculum based on financial risk, goal setting and stability.
 
“I think one of the reasons it’s important is because if we know how to create a budget and fix credit ratings and plan for the future, then we’re going to improve our odds for financial stability and success,” says Jane Chitwood, State Farm representative. “Implementing that early into the youth is going to be huge for the success of our future generations.”
 
“A Slice of Life” is a sample lesson that teaches children the importance of budgeting by breaking down one amount into several different pieces.
 
“It’s a youthful mind,” Chitwood says. “How do you order a pizza and decide all the different ingredients you want on a pizza? Then how do you put it into segments, break it down to build a monthly budget?”
 
According to Chitwood, financial literacy is so important because it sets the standard for a stable future.
 
“Part of State Farm’s mission is to help people realize their dreams,” Chitwood says. “So if we can help them learn financial stability and literacy from the very beginning, we’ll be much better off.”

Do Good:

•    Contact a local State Farm agent if you would like assistance in bringing financial literacy into your school. 

•    Support the Economics Center by donating.

•    Check out the Economics Center's resources for the classroom.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 

Eleven local communities receive grants to increase physical fitness opportunities

Eleven area communities and organizations are the recipients of Interact for Health grants to develop or improve upon spaces for physical activity.
 
“It’s all about creating infrastructure in places where people can be physically active,” says Jaime Love, Interact for Health’s program officer for healthy eating and active living.
 
The Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington, for example, was one the eleven organizations awarded; and as a result, Latonia Elementary School will be the site of a new area from which the whole community can benefit.
 
“They worked in partnership to convert the dilapidated playground at the school and turn it into a community park,” Love says. “So there’ll be a new playground, fitness equipment—there’ll be a walking track—and it really will be something that both the school and the community residents can enjoy.”
 
Other organizations will receive things like a pool lift to increase accessibility, and exercise equipment to add to a fitness trail.
 
According to Love, creating a culture of wellness where people have easy access to physical activity is the goal.
 
“We want to encourage public places that are free of charge as well, because we know cost can be a barrier to some people being able to participate,” Love says.
 
“So when we have lots of public spaces that are safe and up to date and easily accessible—people can walk or bike to them, they’re not too far away from their homes—that just increases the likelihood that they can get out with their family and friends and have some activity on a regular basis.”

Do Good:

•    Check out the 11 physical activity and environments grantees, and make use of the spaces when they become available for use.

•    If you're interested in applying for a grant to receive funds for physical activity environments in 2015, there is still time. Proposals are due by noon, May 1. 

•    Connect with Interact for Health on Facebook.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

 

21c Cincinnati to host international art competition's Pitch Night

Local individuals will have the unique opportunity to gain an advantage in the spotlight among international artists, as 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati will host ArtPrize’s Pitch Night next month.
 
The event is designed to give local artists a boost, while expanding the work of ArtPrize—a nonprofit venture and annual competition that takes place in Grand Rapids, Mich.
 
The goal of the competition is to bring more than 1,500 individuals together to expose and fund the work of emerging artists.
 
“In Cincinnati, there’s a wide range of talented artists working in all mediums—many of whom have been educated by the outstanding arts education institutions, and I feel certain there are a number of wonderful artists in Cincinnati who deserve to have broader exposure on a national stage,” says Alice Gray Stites, 21c’s chief curator and director of art programming.
 
Participation in ArtsPrize would afford local artists that opportunity, says Gray Stites, who wants to see all area artists submit proposals for Pitch Night, in which five chosen finalists will present their pitches to compete for a $5,000 grant to bring their ArtPrize idea to fruition and receive a guaranteed installment space within the competition’s 19-day, three-square-mile exhibition.
 
“ArtPrize shares our dedication to the art of today and especially that of emerging artists,” Gray Stites says. “So we hope all interested Cincinnati-based artists will participate, and we encourage the art community and public to come to the discussion.”
 
Do Good:

Contact ArtPrize for inquiries regarding the application process, and submit your proposal. 

• Attend Pitch Night Cincinnati May 22 at 21c. The event is free and open to the public. Visit the website for more details.

• Like ArtPrize on Facebook.

By Brittany York

Brittany York is a professor of English composition at the University of Cincinnati and a project manager for Charitable Words. She also edits the For Good section of SoapboxMedia. 

271 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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