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Greater Cincinnati Earth Coalition raising money for Earth Day 2016

The Cincinnati Earth Day Celebration isn’t typically celebrated until April, but the Greater Cincinnati Earth Coalition (GCEC) is raising money now for next year’s event. The fundraiser is scheduled for Oct. 9 at City Barbeque locations in Blue Ash and Florence.

Not only will 25 percent of purchases go toward the April event, but customers will be educated on what Earth Day is really about and how to have a better impact on the environment.

“There are different approaches to ‘being green,'” says event chair Standish Fortin. “We want to educate people on what they can do to be a better steward for the Earth. They can come and learn about what they can do and what others are doing.”

Do Good:

• Visit City Barbeque in Blue Ash (10375 Kenwood Road) or Florence (8026 Burlington Pike) on Friday, Oct. 9 and help raise money for Earth Day 2016.

• Check out the Greater Cincinnati Earth Coalition’s Facebook page to learn more about how you can help the environment.  

• The 2016 Earth Day event is looking for sponsors. There are a few different levels of sponsorship to choose from. 

Park + Vine paying it forward to help those in need

Customers can pay it forward at Over-the-Rhine shop Park + Vine by pre-purchasing meals for those in need, specifically the homeless.

Owner Danny Korman was inspired this summer while visiting one of his favorite restaurants, Rosetta’s Kitchen, in Asheville, N.C., and noticing they offered a similar program.
Here’s how it works at Park + Vine: Customers order something off the menu for themselves and add any dollar amount to their ticket, then fill out a post-it note with that dollar amount and tape it on the wall next to the lunch counter. Each note can be redeemed by someone who really needs it, regardless of his or her financial situation.
“One thing I love is that for a moment in time it removes our own ego,” Korman says. “We get so caught in our own head and worries that it separates us from what’s happening around us and with others.”
Tabs can pay for a beans-and-rice dish priced on a sliding scale of $2 to $7, but customers can purchase any menu item for a stranger in need.
The act of kindness movement at Park + Vine is only two weeks old, but it’s already resonating with customers.
“Last week, we had a woman who was having lunch with some folks take two of the tabs on the wall to put toward her purchase,” Korman says. “She charged the remaining amount on her card and then added $3 to pay it forward to someone else.”
The contagious pay-it-forward movement is happening all across the country. A recent NPR segment highlighted a pizza shop in Philadelphia, where 10 percent of sales come from paying it forward by the slice.
The Park + Vine lunch counter is open 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday for brunch.
Do Good:

• Buy a meal for a stranger at the lunch/brunch counter at Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine.

• Follow owner Danny Korman's blog on Park + Vine's website.

• Find ways to pay it forward within your own community.

Athletes, outdoor enthusiasts excited for annual Great Ohio River Swim (moved to Oct. 10)

UPDATE: The event, originally scheduled for Sept. 27, has been moved back to Oct. 10 at the same time and locations. A statement on the event website says: The algae is not clearing from the Ohio River as fast as expected. With no rain forecast and algae as far upriver as Huntington, it is hard to predict if it will clear by September 27. Rather than make a last minute call, the Great Ohio River Swim has elected to proactively postpone the swim to Saturday, October 10.

Over the past seven years more than 850 people — as young as 10 and as experienced as 85 — have completed the Great Ohio River Swim. Oct. 10 marks the eighth annual year for the event, and it’s expected to be a record-breaking year for the timed 900-meter venture across the Ohio and back.
"We are anticipating record participation this year by area high school, college and club swim teams," says Jonathan Grinder, President and CEO of Tuscon Racing Inc., which manages the event. "It’s a great way to highlight Greater Cincinnati's national reputation as a center of excellence for competitive swimming."
While the River Swim does draw participation from triathletes and conditioned swimmers, it’s also open to anyone who can swim and wants to engage in a unique and fun opportunity to take advantage of the last remaining weeks of warm weather.
Proceeds benefit Green Umbrella, a nonprofit alliance that promotes environmental sustainability in our region. Specifically, the Great Ohio River Swim will benefit the nonprofit’s Meet Me Outdoors website, which highlights recreational outings around town.

Event organizers are monitoring the recent "algae bloom" reports about the Ohio River that would make conditions unsafe to swim but say on the event website that "the weather has changed dramatically with cooler temperatures and recent rain, making the likelihood of a health threatening algae bloom increasingly remote. Nevertheless, the Great Ohio River Swim is committed to swimmer safety. We are working closely with ORSANCO and the Cincinnati Health Department to monitor all conditions that might affect swimmer safety."

"This is a fun and safe opportunity for people of all ages to swim across the Ohio," says Brewster Rhoads, Swim Chair and volunteer with Green Umbrella. "Swimmers are invariably impressed with the cleanliness and beauty of the Ohio, and they become more committed to protecting it." 

Do Good: 

Register for the Great Ohio River Swim, which takes place Sunday, Oct. 10 at 8:15 a.m., beginning and ending at the Serpentine Wall/Public Landing in downtown Cincinnati.

• Check out Meet Me Outdoors and find an event to attend with your friends or families. 

• If you're interested in supporting Green Umbrella, find out how you can get involved.

Businesses, residents, community groups transform vacant Walnut Hills lot into community garden

Keep Cincinnati Beautiful kicked off a transformative project last week to turn a vacant Walnut Hills lot into a community garden, thanks to help from more than 20 Lowe’s Heroes and volunteers from the Health & Wellness Walnut Hills initiative.
The endeavor includes plans for raised vegetable beds, an art and journaling area and a walking meditation pathway and will be completed in three to four weeks, with measures in place to ensure sustainability for years to come.
“We are continuing to build a strong team of dedicated neighborhood volunteers,” says Gary Dangel, community activist and co-founder of Elevate Walnut Hills. “With the ongoing support of local businesses and organizations such as Lowe’s and Keep Cincinnati Beautiful, we will create a fun, interactive place that encourages kids to explore and discover the wonders of nature.”
Dangel led the creative process for the garden’s design on Park Avenue, just one project in the neighborhood’s push for community health and wellness.

Longtime residents like Cecil Evans, who has lived in Walnut Hills for nearly 40 years, are excited to witness the transformation and to put the renovated space to use.
“It’s been a nuisance. I can’t understand why people litter the Earth,” Evans says. “I lived off a farm most of my life and plan to grow vegetables here next year.”

Do Good:

• Support Keep Cincinnati Beautiful by donating.

• Learn about ways you can get involved with Keep Cincinnati Beautiful by volunteering.

• Join Keep Cincinnati Beautiful as the organization launches a crowdfunding campaign for Over-the-Rhine's Grant Park at the Christian Moerlein Brewery Taproom 5-7 p.m. Aug. 19.

Rescheduled Paddlefest hosts three float events and downtown festival

The 14th annual Ohio River Paddlefest, whose original June dates were swamped by heavy rain and high river levels, is set for Aug. 2. Online pre-registration is closed, but on-site registration is available both Aug. 1 and 2.
According to Brewster Rhoads, Paddlefest Chair and former executive director of Green Umbrella — sponsor of the event — the thrill kayakers will experience on Aug. 2 is the same one that will prompt future generations of people to become invested in the Ohio River and all it has to offer as a natural resource.
“Sitting just inches above the water line in a canoe or kayak lets one feel the power of the Ohio as it conveys rainfall from seven upriver states to the Gulf of Mexico,” he says. “If you close your eyes, you can just imagine how Lewis and Clark felt as they made their way downriver in 1803.”

Paddlefest offers three opportunities to get in the water Aug. 2: a five-mile stand-up paddleboard (SUP) race, an 11-mile canoe and kayak race and the 8.2-mile paddle. The races begin at 7:30 a.m., followed by the paddle start. All boats put in at Coney Island and finish at the Public Landing downtown. Shuttle buses will take participants from downtown to Coney Island before the events (6-8 a.m.) and after (10 a.m.-1:45 p.m.).

The Gold Star Chili Finish Line Festival at Yeatman’s Cove will run 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., featuring live music, racer awards, Global Water Dancers, food, beer and exhibitors.
Kayaking between the downtown bridges with the Cincinnati skyline as a backdrop will undoubtedly be a unique experience and a scene to be remembered. It’s the largest paddling event in the country and one Rhoads says should not be missed.
“It is hard to love something you don't know. That's why Paddlefest is so effective in changing attitudes about the Ohio,” Rhoads says. “By giving 2,000 adults and children each year an opportunity to get an up-close and personal experience with the beauty and majesty of the Ohio, Paddlefest is helping to grow the next generation of environmental stewards.” 

Do Good: 

• Interested in paddling the Ohio? Register on-site at Coney Island Saturday, Aug. 1 (9 a.m.-1 p.m.) or Sunday, Aug. 2 (starting at 6:30 a.m.). Check here for prices and details.

• If you're feeling competitive, join one of the two races Aug. 2.

• Become an environmental steward by getting involved with Green Umbrella and its other initiatives year-round.

Metro offers free Fan Shuttle in downtown, OTR to connect All Star Game weekend activities

If you’re worried about downtown traffic and parking during All Star Game weekend, look no further than Metro, which is offering free shuttle service for related festivities.
The Metro Fan Shuttle will run 7-10 p.m. Friday, July 10; 12-10 p.m. Saturday, July 11; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday, July 12; and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. as well as 6-9 p.m. Monday, July 13. Buses will run a loop from Fountain Square to Government Square to Duke Energy Convention Center to Washington Park every 10-12 minutes.
“Metro is running the free Fan Shuttle as a courtesy to the community to help ease traffic congestion and allow easier access for visitors and residents to enjoy the dozens of events and activities scheduled during All Star weekend in downtown and Over-the-Rhine,” says Brandy Jones, Metro’s public relations manager.
According to Jones, an estimated 200,000 visitors are expected in town during the weekend, so there’s no better time to leave your car behind. Metro offers 21 different Park & Ride locations to bring you downtown, in addition to 50 routes throughout the region.
“It's a great way to introduce new riders to our service and remind the community just how easy and convenient it is to take Metro every day,” Jones says. “And once they're in town, the free Metro Fan Shuttle allows riders to hop on and off along the route connecting them to dozens of events at the Duke Energy Center, Fountain Square and Washington Park.” 

The Duke Energy Center is hosting the T-Mobile All Star FanFest Friday-Tuesday, and there are free events every day at Fountain Square and Washington Park. Soapbox has the full schedule of All Star Game events and festivities here.

Do Good: 

• Hop aboard Metro's Fan Shuttle. Hours of operation and details regarding pick-up and drop-off sites can be found here.

• Take part in All Star Game festivities, and attend free events around town.

• New rider? Learn everything you need to know about riding Metro here.

People Working Cooperatively volunteers make 33rd annual Repair Affair a success

Celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, People Working Cooperatively recently completed its 33rd annual Repair Affair by fixing 40 homes for individuals who were unable to either afford or complete the repairs themselves.
Roofing, carpentry, electrical work and plumbing comprised the skill sets of more than 300 volunteers who came together to make this year’s outing a success. Porches were rebuilt, doorbells fixed and ramps installed — projects ranging widely in size and scope — in order to make more livable, safer homes for elderly individuals, individuals with disabilities and individuals struggling to make ends meet.
According to Kim Sullivan, PWC’s marketing and communications manager, the repairs offered were “life-saving.”
“From ramps to handrails to replaced porches, they (volunteers) kept our clients safe and independent in their homes,” Sullivan says.
Repair Affair, presented by the city of Cincinnati and The Home Depot, is just one of the many initiatives offered by PWC and its volunteer base, which works year-round to repair homes, to conserve energy through weatherization and to modify aspects within the home's interior and exterior to allow for increased mobility.
“We always need donations to support these services,” Sullivan says. “We need volunteers year-round.” 

Do Good:

• Support the work of People Working Cooperatively by donating.

• If you're interested in volunteering with PWC, contact Aaron Grant at 513-351-7921.

• Connect with PWC on Facebook.

OTR Foundation launches crowdfunding campaign to support Rothenberg rooftop garden

The Over-the-Rhine Foundation kicks off its crowdfunding campaign for the Rothenberg Rooftop School Garden with a happy hour at Goodfellas Pizzeria on Main Street Wednesday, May 20.
Tickets for the event are $20, include a slice of pizza and a beer and benefit the garden project, which is in need of everything from workstations and potting benches students can use during garden classes to mixing bowls and salad spinners for lessons on nutrition and food sources.
“The Rothenberg Rooftop School Garden is a transformational project that builds community by connecting students in OTR to the values of gardening in their school environment,” says Kevin Pape, president of the Over-the-Rhine Foundation. “The Foundation proudly supports Rothenberg’s students and the realization of the rooftop garden project.”
And it has done so loyally, raising more than $300,000 for the garden to date.
Nearly 450 students at Rothenberg Preparatory Academy engaged in a multitude of unique, hands-on learning opportunities afforded by the garden during the 2014-15 school year, but needs are ongoing.
Even if you’re unable to support the launch of the crowdfunding campaign this week, you can contribute online to help the OTR Foundation and the Rothenberg Rooftop School Garden reach its $5,000 goal.
For Bryna Bass, rooftop garden program manager, it’s a goal that will allow students the opportunity to further their application of gardening to real-world scenarios.
“They learn gardening, but that’s not the mission,” Bass says. “They get to garden — that’s icing on the cake — but it’s deepening their math skills, deepening their science skills, English, language arts, literacy, social studies. We get to use it in just about any curriculum.” 

Do Good: 

Contribute to the crowdfunding campaign and attend the May 20 happy hour launch.

• Connect with the Rooftop School Garden on Facebook.

• Share your time and materials as a volunteer. Contact Bryna Bass if you're available to help. 

Free public transit for riders on Bike to Work Day May 15

Whether or not you’re working on Friday, May 15, you’ll have the opportunity to commute between destinations for free on all Metro, Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky (TANK) and Clermont Transportation Connection buses so long as you bring along a bicycle.
Vehicles are equipped with bike racks on the fronts of buses, so riders are encouraged to take advantage of environmentally friendly modes of transit in celebration of Bike to Work Day 2015.
“Biking and riding Metro is the perfect way to travel for those who want to bike for part of their commute and finish their trip on transit or just get to the top of one of Cincinnati's many hills,” says Brandy Jones, public relations manager for Cincinnati Metro. “It's also an environmentally responsible way to get around, which supports Metro's sustainability effort and encourages an overall healthier lifestyle.”
Since 2011, both Metro and TANK have been recognized as “bike friendly destinations” for riders, as the public transit authorities are not only advocates for biking and riding but also supporters of improvements for infrastructure.
If you have access to a bike and have somewhere to go but have never transported it via public transit, don’t let that stop you. Jones says it’s an easy process that your driver will be more than happy to help with should you need assistance.
“Bike to Work Day is a great way for anyone who's curious about combining the two transportation options to try it out risk free,” Jones says. “Our bike racks are fast and easy to use, and we hope bicycle commuters will take advantage of the free ride on May 15 and give biking and riding a try.”

Do Good: 

• Grab your bicycle and take advantage of free rides on public transit Friday, May 15.

• Celebrate National Bike Month throughout May by going for a ride.

• Connect with Metro on Facebook.

Starfire members explore passions, engage with community

For Starfire members like Matt Weisshaar, working on a community project is an important responsibility prompted by passion and accompanied by the development of leadership skills and relationship building.
Starfire is focused on decreasing the social isolation felt by people with disabilities. The Madisonville-based nonprofit is a conduit to relationships for those with disabilities, family members and community residents looking to get involved, and its approach is “one family, one person at a time,” says Rachel Almendinger, director of donor relations.

“We have a brainstorming night for each member to discuss what they’re interested in, and we get people there that are interested in the same thing to help us connect, network and ideate,” she says. “Then they start a project, so Starfire facilitates it but it’s really about Matt.”
Weisshaar, whom Almendinger says “loves science, loves nature, loves animals,” is currently working with Cincinnati Nature Center to put together a Citizen’s Science Day, when community members will join together to bond over bird-watching and compete in a nature-related activity.
“Our hope with that is Matt will be able to find some more long-term friends and create deeper relationships, not based on his disability but based on his interests and passions,” Almendinger says.
It’s work like this that Starfire will showcase at its Annual Celebration, which for the first time will comprise not only the Evening Celebration but also a Breakfast Celebration for business professionals unable to attend the nighttime happenings.
“At first it was a way to celebrate members, but people started loving the stories so much that more and more started coming who wanted to live a more inclusive life,” Almendinger says. “It’s meant to inspire that. Our goal is to help people make friends.” 

Do Good: 

• Kick off the work day by supporting Starfire and purchasing seats for the Breakfast Celebration, June 24 at 7:30 a.m. at the 20th Century Theater in Oakley.

• Celebrate the work and passions of Starfire members at the Evening Celebration June 24 at 6:30 p.m., also at the 20th Century Theater. This event is free and open to the public.

Contact Starfire if you're interested in partnering with the organization. Members would love to visit your business and explore potential opportunities and career paths. 

Metro adds five new mini-hybrids in celebration of Earth Day

Metro will celebrate Earth Day by adding five new mini-hybrids to its 365-bus fleet, bringing the mini-hybrid total to 115 along with 27 traditional hybrid vehicles also in service.
Despite the name, mini-hybrids aren't actually miniature in size. Rather, they're equipped with advanced thermal cooling systems that allow for a cost savings of about $240,000 per bus as compared to traditional hybrid vehicles.
With reduced greenhouse gas emissions and improved fuel economy, Metro — a member organization of Green Umbrella — is doing its part to “meet the environmental, social and economic needs of today while preserving the ability of future generations to do the same" with the addition of more mini-hybrids.
In addition to the new vehicles that begin serving riders Wednesday, April 22, Metro will celebrate Mother Nature by participating in a variety of Earth Day events around the city, encouraging community members to learn more about going green.
"Metro is a member of the community, and we take our environmental responsibility seriously,” Metro CEO Dwight Ferrell says.
By using rainwater to wash buses and burning waste oil to heat garages, the public transit system is modeling a standard for what green living can look like. Similarly, by educating community members on hybrid technology and the reduced impact it has on our environment, Metro hopes to encourage more individuals to do their part as well.
“We're proud to promote green practices both in our facilities and with our bus fleet," Ferrell says. "To be able to provide the community with an environmentally responsible way to travel throughout Cincinnati benefits us all."

Do Good: 

• Visit Metro and learn about mini-hybrid technology and going green at local Earth Day events. You can celebrate at The Christ Hospital 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday April 21, at Horseshoe Casino 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wednesday April 22 or at Cincinnati State Technical & Community College's Earth Jam 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. Thursday April 23.

• Connect with Metro on Facebook.

• Promote "green" practices in your own lifestyle.

ArtWorks restarts Saturday Mural Tours of OTR and downtown public art

ArtWorks, the local nonprofit that employs young people to create public art, is again offering its Saturday Mural Tours program.
Each 90-minute walk — one through Over-the-Rhine, one through Downtown — is approximately a mile long and features 7-10 murals created by ArtWorks artists. The OTR tour begins at Coffee Emporium at the corner of Walnut Street and Central Parkway at noon, while the Downtown walk begins on Fountain Square at 2 p.m. Two guides lead each tour.
The Spirit of OTR tour features “Mr. Tarbell Tips His Hat,” “The Golden Muse” and “Strongman Henry Holtgrewe” among other murals. The Cincinnati Genius tour includes three works from the Cincinnati Master Artist series, including Charley Harper’s “Homecoming (Bluebirds),” Tom Wesselman’s Still Life #60” and John Ruthven’s “Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon.”
The tours help raise money for ArtWorks, which lured the then 88-year-old Ruthven to a scaffold at Eighth and Vine streets in the summer of 2013 to work with 15 apprentice artists on a massive rendition of his original “Martha” that covers the entire side of a downtown building.
The tours run every Saturday through November and are $20 for adults and free for children under 12. Tickets must be purchased in advance.

Do Good:

• Join one of the mural tours by purchasing tickets in advance through the ArtWorks website, which also offers discounts and coupons to A Tavola in OTR’s Gateway Quarter following the tours.

• Find out about all 90 of ArtWorks’ public murals, located in numerous neighborhoods on both sides of the river, and do your own self-guided tour.

Support ArtWorks’ mission to employ, engage, create and transform the Greater Cincinnati region.

OSU Extension seeks community input from "future leaders"

If you’re between the ages of 14 and 30, Ohio State University Extension of Hamilton County wants your input on the concept of a perfect community and what that might look like. 

As a land-grant university, OSU Extension aims to bring “the knowledge of the university” to all Ohioans by “engaging people to strengthen their lives and communities.” 

“OSU Extension works with people of all ages and all walks of life. We hear from professionals and adults on a regular basis,” says Anthony Staubach, Interim County Extension Director. “But it’s important to hear from the 14- to 30-year-old population because they are our emerging leaders and will make key decisions in the future.” 

OSU Extension will conduct the “Community Reconsidered" focus group Saturday, driven by these questions: “What will be the most challenging trends and issues for Ohioans by the year 2035, and what are the best opportunities to leverage the strengths of the University and the OSU Extension to address those issues?”

It’s part of a national dialogue called “Extension Reconsidered.” 

For the past 100 years, OSU Extension has worked to better the lives of individuals all across the state, and Staubach says the goal is to now look 20 years into the future to figure out “what assets our generation will bring to the community, what opportunities exist for building a stronger community” and, finally, what role Extension will fulfill in a changing culture and a changing community. 

“We would like to hear from 30-60 residents in Hamilton County,” Staubach says. “We would like to get their honest and open opinion of the future and start to identify how OSU Extension can fit into that future.”

Do Good: 

• Share a meal and your ideas with other community members at Saturday's focus group, which begins at 6 p.m. March 14 at 5093 Colerain Ave. Register here.

• Join the Facebook event and share it with your friends. 

• Connect with Hamilton County Extension on Facebook.

Devou Park to gain 2,700 trees in reforestation effort

The Northern Kentucky Urban & Community Forestry Council’s annual Reforest Northern Kentucky program seeks volunteers who can assist in planting about 2,700 native tree seedlings across 2.8 acres of land in Covington’s Devou Park.

Over the past eight years, more than 2,000 volunteers have joined together to cover 30 acres worth of previously mowed property in an effort to restore Kentucky’s native woodlands.

According to Tara Sturgill, Reforest NKY secretary and chair of public relations subcommittee, the greatest impact of the event — aside from the planting of thousands of native trees — is the knowledge gained by those dedicating their time. 

“Volunteers learn proper planting of a tree, the multiple benefits to our communities of healthy native forests, selecting the most appropriate tree species for a specific location, and current impacts effecting our native forests,” Sturgill says. “And (they also gain) a general appreciation and yearning to be a steward of our natural woodland areas.”

In addition to planting trees at the event itself, 900 “take home” seedlings will be distributed to volunteers who can then apply their knowledge following the morning’s activity. 

For Sturgill, it’s important to cultivate “a spirit of stewardship for our native forests,” as the benefits of reforestation stretch far into the future. 

“Native woodlands provide improved air quality, storm water reduction, a habitat for various types of wildlife, increased property value, and natural spaces for education and recreation,” Sturgill says. “Reforestation is more than just planting trees and recreating a natural forested landscape. The value added by a woodland has advantages that cannot be measured by monetary means to our communities, and to us as individuals." 

Do Good: 

•    Register for Reforest Northern Kentucky on Saturday, March 28 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

•    Plant a tree at home or in your community and empower yourself with the knowledge of proper planting and care of your selected tree.

•    Support organizations and businesses that recognize the importance and value of trees.

Cornerstone provides OTR residents with housing plus opportunity

Cornerstone Corporation for Shared Equity might provide individuals with safe, affordable housing, but it also gives them the opportunity to earn money back after five and 10 years of responsible renting.
“We’re really a social enterprise,” says Rob Sheil, the nonprofit’s executive director. “We’re trying to provide opportunity for folks to lift themselves out of poverty.”
According to Sheil, the organization provides “a hand up” rather than a handout. To earn renter equity, individuals must attend monthly meetings — similar to association meetings hosted for condominium residents — pay rent on time and complete a weekly task by participating in property maintenance and upkeep.
“Participation in the weekly task not only helps lower operating costs, which is how you earn the renters’ equity, but also gives you a sense of ownership you can’t get anywhere else,” Sheil says.
After five years, residents have the opportunity to earn $4,100. After 10 years, they can early up to $10,000.
Sheil says many of the residents use the money to pay for things like medical expenses, education or tuition, camps for children or grandchildren and even as a downpayment on a home.
“One of our former resident board members who had been with us more than 10 years recently moved with her husband into Price Hill, and they purchased a home,” Sheil says. “And while we miss her day-to-day leadership and her presence as a resident board member, it’s just fabulous to have someone with that success when, by all rights, no one would have really predicted that 10 years ago.”
For Sheil, it’s all about “the American dream,” though his vision differs from the typical own-a-home mentality.
“As a real estate professional for more than 20 years, I love the idea of — in certain situations — people owning their own home,” he says. “But I think the American dream is having a solid roof over your head and the ability to build wealth over time by doing the right things and by being invested in your neighborhood, your community, your school system, perhaps a worship or faith group or a garden club.
“You commit to the people around you in the neighborhood that you come in contact with every day, so to me the American dream is a whole lot more than that picket fence and the house behind it.” 

Do Good: 

•    Support Cornerstone Corporation for Shared Equity by donating.

•    The organization will host its first-ever fundraising event in May. Contact Rob Sheil for more information.

•    Change your idea of what's possible for individuals who appear to have limited means.
102 Green Articles | Page: | Show All
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