| Follow Us:
Building blocks / scott beseler
Building blocks / scott beseler | Show Photo

Talent : Development News

283 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All

New Braxton Brewing Co. will combine beer, education, technology

Evan Rouse has been brewing beer in his dad’s garage for the past six years. After a visit to Upland Brewing Co. when he was 16, he fell in love with craft beer. Evan’s success in brewing competitions caught the attention of Richard Dubé, former vice president of brewing and quality at Christian Moerlein.
 
Later this year, Evan and his brother, Jake, and father, Greg, along with Dubé, will open Braxton Brewing Co. in Covington. They will start off with local production, and then expand to other areas of the Midwest.
 
“Looking across the industry and what’s happening in Over-the-Rhine, we saw the number of craft beer fans out there,” Jake says. “We’re looking to bridge the gap between Ohio and Kentucky, and prove that the river isn’t an ocean between us.”
 
Although Evan and Dubé will handle the brewing, Jake will be behind Braxton Brewing’s digital branding, and Greg is working on the brewery’s educational approach. Jake, a manager at ExactTarget, plans to launch a mobile app that will leverage what technology can provide in the craft beer industry.
 
“We want to help revolutionize beer, and we hope this app will do that,” he says.
 
Braxton Brewing partnered with Miami University for the digital branding aspect of the company, and Neltner Small Batch worked on the company’s physical branding.
 
The group also wants to focus on educating their customers. “We want to put the customer at the center of our brewery by creating an atmosphere around craft beer and learning about craft beer,” Greg says. “We think it’s important to keep people as close to the product as possible.”
 
The brewery will be housed in an 11,000-square-foot space on Seventh Street in the Pike Street Corridor. There will be between 15-20 beers on tap at any given time, with Braxton’s core brands and rotating seasonal and specialty beers as well.
 
Evan and Dubé designed the brewery’s 20-barrel, three-vessel system, and are now working with manufacturers on the actual product.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


CoSign project headed to Covington

On March 27, the American Sign Museum launched its second round of its CoSign project in Covington. The project area is the 400-900 blocks of Madison Avenue, and Seventh and Pike streets between Madison and Washington.
 
The project will last six months, with the unveiling of the new signs on Art off Pike’s 10th anniversary on Sept. 28.
 
CoSign offers a unique opportunity for artists and designers to create new, handcrafted signs for local retailers. It enhances economic activity in neighborhood business districts by pairing artists, small businesses and professional sign fabricators to design and install unique, handcrafted signs for local retailers.
 
Any artist, designer or local business interested in participating in CoSign must attend one of the two workshops, which will be held on April 28 and May 6 at Covington Arts.
 
CoSign, which was launched in Northside in 2012, was developed by the American Sign Museum and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation. In 2013, ArtPlace America granted the Haile Foundation $150,000, which allowed CoSign to expand its efforts in Northside, and repeat in Covington this year. The National Endowment for the Arts also granted Covingotn Arts $50,000 to support the project.
 
Businesses located within the project area are encouraged to apply to the competition. The deadline is April 10.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Local brewer paying homage to Taft with new brewery, restaurant

There will soon be a new brewery on the scene in Over-the-Rhine. Kevin Moreland, former head brewer at Listermann/Triple Digit Brewing Company, is opening Taft’s Ale House in the historic St. Paul’s Church complex.
 
Built in the 1850s, the church has been abandoned since the ’80s. The city acquired the church and attempted to repair it, but the funds were never there. 3CDC bought it in 2010 for $350,000, and later made about $450,000 worth of structural repairs, including a new roof and some internal work.
 
Several other tenants were considered for the space, including offices and other commercial options.  
 
Taft’s Ale House pays homage to the 27th President of the United States and Cincinnati native William Howard Taft. The $8 million brewery is looking to open this fall or winter.
 
Taft’s beer will be made from locally sourced ingredients and is inspired by OTR restaurants, bars and specialty food retailers. There will be 12 beers on tap—three staples chosen by patrons, and the others will rotate seasonally. There will also be a menu with pub fare, which will include tri-tip steak sandwiches.
 
All three floors of the church will be utilized by Taft’s. The first floor, or Big Billy’s Basement, will house the brewery’s barrel-aged projects and rotating taps of local beer. The second floor will be the main beer hall with a view of the entire brewing process, including the eight 20BBL fermenters and eight 20BBL serving vessels behind the bar, separated by a catwalk. The third floor, or Brauzzine, will be the dining room that overlooks the beer hall.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Northside art gallery features modernist art by local artists

Object, a new art gallery and retail store in Northside, features modernist pieces from the early 20th century. Artists Keith Chrapliwy of Modology and Andrew Kozakov teamed up to offer a range of art-driven furniture, paintings, sculpture and small objects.
 
Items run an artistic range that starts with early 20th century-inspired Constructivist paintings and sculpture, and continues through the 1950s living room culture. It finishes with chairs of the 1950s and 1970s by designers like Eames and Kofod-Lawson. There are also restored and reworked items like valises and small tables, paintings in new styles and a small collection of creatively made jewelry. Object’s collection will vary as Chrapliwy and Kozakov bring in new pieces from their collections.
 
Chrapliwy and Kozakov made a large number of the furniture and artwork pieces—Chrapliwy’s walnut Modology cabinets are in high demand, and are colorful with handmade Lucite panels; Kozakov focuses more on furniture, including a tall, elegant wooden sculpture that contains a hidden bar cabinet that’s large enough to hold glasses and wine.
 
“We want to blur the line between high art and functional pieces,” Chrapliwy says. “We both hope that visitors to the store can envision the possibilities of creating their own artistic environment.”
 
The store, which is located at 4008 Hamilton Ave., also has work by other artists, including Spencer van der Zee, a Cincinnati folk artist, and jewelry designer Brie Hiudt, who is Object’s guest artist through December.
 
Items range in price from $16 for T-shirts by van der Zee, to $25 for a metal case, to $2,750 for the handmade bar cabinet.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Queen City Cookies opens Northside cafe

Peggy Shannon moved to Cincinnati in 2006, and started baking cookies out of her home. As Queen City Cookies grew, a café seemed like the next logical step. Shannon recently opened a four-room café in the old St. Pius Church complex in Northside.
 
The café, which is inside the former rectory, consists of an espresso bar and a pop-up Madisono’s gelato shop. There are also two whimsical seating areas and ceramic tiled staircases. 
 
The partnership with Madisono’s has allowed Shannon’s sweet treats to now be served ala mode. Special flavors of gelato were designed in conjunction with Queen City’s schnecken as well.
 
Queen City also welcomed former co-owner of Take the Cake, Doug Faulkner, to the team. “Doug has brought so many new things to the table,” Shannon says. “We now have croschnecken, which is half croissant and half schnecken. We also have a bread pudding made from schnecken.”
 
Another addition to Queen City’s team was Michelle Lightfoot, the former owner of Poppies and Deli seven20. Shannon and Lightfoot have plans to roll out a light, limited lunch menu of soups and sandwiches in early 2014.
 
The expansion has also allowed for a line of pastries Queen City didn’t have room for before. The bakery’s menu now includes vegan items from Sweet Peace Bakery and gluen-free choices from local sources.
 
“One of the only downsides to our expansion is that I don’t bake anymore,” Shannon says. “I used to have a hand in everything, but now I’m more into research and development of new things.”
 
Queen City recently applied for a liquor license, and there are plans to offer cooking classes and host parties. Now, Shannon is encouraging customers to utilize the café for meetings.

And as if expanding isn't enough, each quarter, Queen City also raises money and awareness for a different nonprofit. This quarter, they're supporting Caracole, the first organization in Ohio to provide housing for people living with HIV/AIDS. The product to buy to support Caracole is Queen City's blueberry schnecken, served by the slice or in loaves. People can also help out by donating toiletries at Queen City.

Queen City also supports organizations online through Cookies for a Cause. This quarter, 50 percent of the sales of Queen City’s version of Brooksters, which is a rich brownie bottom, a double stuffed Oreo middle and a chocolate chip cookie on top, goes to WordPlay.
 
The café is open Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Home-based bakery business expanding, opening downtown storefront

Taren Kinebrew started baking with her grandmother when she was a child. Her love of baking has always been a hobby, but in the next few weeks, Kinebrew will be opening a storefront for Sweet Petit Desserts at 1426 Race St. in Over-the-Rhine.  
 
“I wanted to be in a community where people support small businesses,” Kinebrew says. “I like the walking traffic and diversity of Over-the-Rhine, and knew that Sweet Petit Desserts would fit in with what I know Cincinnati and the neighborhood to be.”
 
The 753-square-foot space will have a kitchen and two cases of bite-sized desserts for sale. The cases are moveable so Kinebrew can host events with the help of Christina Christian, owner of Something Chic, an event planning business. The two have teamed up in the past to plan baby showers, wedding receptions and fundraisers.
 
Sweet Petit will have a very artsy feel, with vibrant colors from the desserts down to the flooring, Kinebrew says.
 
Kinebrew hasn’t always done desserts. She was in the Army National Guard for seven years and has a degree in information systems and a minor in accounting. But she has always loved making sweets for friends and family, and her own business seemed like the next logical step. She started Sweet Petit out of her home in 2009.
 
Last fall, Kinebrew applied to be part of Bad Girl Ventures, and she won a $25,000 loan and $5,000 in marketing and website assistance from the program. Bad Girl helped her with forming a financial plan and official business plan.
 
Sweet Petit will offer red velvet mini cupcakes, bite-sized brownies, cheesecakes, key lime bars, lemon squares, pie tartlets, cake pops, cookies and desserts in cups—think chocolate mousse. Prices will range from $2 per dessert to $9.50 for a half dozen or $18 for a dozen. More expensive items like pie tartlets and chocolate dipped strawberries will be $24 per dozen.
 
Sweet Petit will have three paid employees, including Kinebrew. She also hopes to bring on interns so they can learn how to run a business and hone their pastry skills.  
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Manifest Gallery expanding, offering more to visitors

Manifest Gallery recently added two new galleries, which is a 66 percent increase. It now has a total of five galleries of art for its visitors to enjoy—Main Gallery, Drawing Room, Parallel Space, Central Gallery and North Gallery. The “new” Manifest is celebrating its expansion on Friday, November 8 with a free, public reception from 6 to 9 p.m., coinciding with the monthly Walk on Woodburn event.
 
The Main and North Galleries face the street, and the entrance to Manifest is through the Main Gallery at 2727 Woodburn Ave. Exhibits will vary in terms of how many galleries each occupies. For example, Fresh Paint will be presented in three galleries while Aquachrome is in two, and one will be flanked by the other so visitors will first experience the works in Fresh Paint, then Aquachrome, then Fresh Paint again.
 
“We’ll rarely have all five spaces dedicated to one exhibit because we find that offering a variety of exhibits in combination, including routine solo exhibits, enhances visitor experience,” says Jason Franz, Manifest’s executive director. “Having all five galleries will make the experience from room to room more like a museum or a film—time-based, sequential and hopefully dramatic.”
 
This season, Manifest is also evolving its exhibition catalog publication process from a small color catalog per exhibit, for a total of nine each year, to one large hardcover book that documents the entire season, including every work and artist involved during the year. The Manifest Exhibition Annual is the fourth annual publication that the Manifest Press publishes (others are the International Drawing Annual, the International Painting Annual and the International Photography Annual).
 
“The expansion allows for 25 percent more exhibits this year,” Franz says. “We want to bring the world to Cincinnati and represent Cincinnati to the world one work of art at a time.”
 
Manifest will also showcase a new exhibition program, Regional Showcase Series, which will be shown three or four times per year. The exhibit contains works of art by artists who live in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana.

In addition to the gallery, Manifest is also behind other initiatives like the Drawing Lab, a studio program that is supported by a grant from the Ohio Arts Council. The Drawing Lab, located at the Manifest Drawing Center in Madisonville, is free to high school and college students, but is open to everyone, from novice to professional, for a nominal membership fee.
 
“We’re not just an art gallery, but also a nonprofit,” Franz says. “We’re intended to be a small, bite-sized, museum-like experience of excellent and varied contemporary art from a wide geographical radius that anyone can take in with a short stroll through the galleries, after dinner or during a visit to the neighborhood. We hope they leave with something more than they arrived with—a sense of wonder for or awareness of what creative people work hard to make in the world.”
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Southern fare is on the menu at Lori Beth's Cafe downtown

Lori Beth Henry, owner of Lori Beth’s Café, began cooking with her grandmother at the age of 6; at 12, she was cooking for events and people at her father’s church. Her love of cooking led her into the catering business and the restaurant world in 2009. Her restaurant moved downtown to the Sawyer Point Building in July.
 
The first Lori Beth’s was in Dry Ridge, Ky., in a Toyota dealership. When the old 720 Deli space opened up in Cincinnati, Henry jumped at the chance to move in. The 1,000-square-foot space seats about 350 people.
 
Henry makes everything from scratch, and puts a twist on typical Southern dishes. Customer favorites include the meatloaf sandwich, which consists of a homemade meatloaf with sautéed veggies in it, and topped with homemade BBQ sauce, creamy Swiss, bacon and a homemade jalapeno mayonnaise; the turkey club, which is baked in-house and tastes like Thanksgiving; and desserts.
 
“My grandmother taught me how to cook on the weekends,” Henry says. “We would go out and milk cows, and do all sorts of things with the milk—make butter, cottage cheese, buttermilk. I loved the whole process of taking the milk from the cow and how you’re able to make so many different things.”
 
Henry’s whole family works with her—her husband Kenneth quit his job to work beside her, and their daughter Kassidy and son Taylor help out too. Even Henry’s best friend and her son work at Lori Beth’s.
 
“Lori Beth’s is truly a family thing,” Henry says. “I like to have people get a sense of how I grew up and what I grew up doing. I love when people come in and enjoy the slow-cooked, Southern style food and hospitality. We’re trying to get people to enjoy what they’re doing, what they’re eating and what they’re tasting.”
 
Lori Beth’s caters company and client meetings of all sizes, both on and offsite; major events, conferences and office parties; rooftop gatherings during and after hours for Sawyer Point tenants; corporate team-building exercises; special occasions; and private and themed dinner parties. The restaurant also makes birthday cakes, desserts, pies, edible arrangements and gift baskets for all occasions.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Ubahn Fest brings electronic and hip-hop music to Metro Transit Center

A-Trak and Mike Posner are headlining Cincinnati’s Ubahn Fest, a hip-hop and electronic dance music festival that will be held in the Metro Transit Center under Second Street downtown. The festival is November 15 and 16; single-day passes are $20, and two-day passes are $30 in advance.
 
The name of the event pays homage to Cincinnati’s German heritage—“Ubahn” means underground rapid transit or metro.
 
“We saw an opportunity to leverage one of the most inclusive and hidden spaces within Cincinnati in the Transit Center,” says Andrew Salzbrun, managing partner at AGAR, one of the festival’s sponsors. “We also saw that there was a huge opportunity for a combined electronic/hip-hop festival in the city because our current festivals—MPMF and Bunbury—don’t cover the genres.”
 
The Transit Center offers an impressive visual space and underground atmosphere that’s ideal for the culture of the target demographic, Salzbrun says. It also has all of the benefits of an outdoor venue, without weather restrictions, and it will bring consumers to a new experience.
 
Besides A-Trak, festival-goers can expect to see DJ Davey C, DJ Prism, The Animal Crackers, Panzer, Disco Joe, DJ Worldpeace, Simo, DJ Fursur, The Runnerz, Briz Rain, Trademark Aaron, Puck, Erik Barnum, The Natives, Sh3llz, Easy El Loco and DJ Vizion on Friday. On Saturday, Posner is the headliner, along with Cal Scruby, K.M.F., CJ Townsend, Black Signal, DJ Donkis, DJ Magnificent, DJ Sinceer, DJ Drowsy, Valley High, Buggs Tha Rocka, Santino Corleon, Those Guys, Big Cam, Sleep, Nuk and Nick Youngerman.
 
There will also be interactive components, food trucks, live skating and BMX, and more than 45 culture vendors selling their wares.
 
“We hope that Ubahn will bring a fresh event approach to the landscape that offers top-notch experiences for fans of electronic and hip-hop music,” Salzbrun says.
 
Ubahn Fest is sponsored by Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, AGAR and Self Diploma.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


UC tech accelerator moves to Short Vine

The University of Cincinnati’s Technology Commercialization Accelerator recently opened at its temporary space on Short Vine. The accelerator’s permanent home at 2630 Vine Street is undergoing renovations, and is expected to be ready next year.
 
The move is due to a partnership between the accelerator and SV ARX, LLC, a Short Vine development group. The collaboration began with the signing of a memorandum of understanding in early 2012 when the accelerator was launched.
 
The accelerator, which was founded to bridge the gap between early-stage technology and investment dollars, focuses on identifying promising, early-stage technologies; assessing technologies to determine viable startup company opportunities; developing commercialization strategies; and facilitating the work necessary to move technology toward commercialization. It offers a number of services, including a number of highly experienced entrepreneurs-in-residence, early-stage grant funding for commercialization, and now, a workshop for teams to meet and further develop concepts.
 
The accelerator has committed $160,000 in awards to four promising projects led by UC investigators. Funding for the accelerator comes from Ohio’s Third Frontier Entrepreneurial Signature Program, UC’s partnership with CincyTech, UC’s 2019 Entrepreneur Grant funds and other outside sources.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Circus Mojo founder starting first U.S. training center for medical clowning

Paul Miller started out as a clown with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey. He founded Circus Mojo, a circus arts program for children and adults, in 2009, and will be opening the Institute of Social Circus & Vocational Training Center in Ludlow, Ky., next year.
 
The Institute of Social Circus will be the first training center in the world dedicated to teaching adults circus techniques, team building skills and social work principles for the purpose of training, educating and meeting the needs of disenfranchised youth, hospitalized people and youth in juvenile centers or other institutions.
 
The Institute for Social Circus is developing a certification program in applying circus training with three focus areas: youth, medical settings and adults who are seniors and/or have disabilities.
 
“For about 20 years, I’ve heard all of the baggage that comes with being a clown in the United States, and I want to work to broaden it from a strictly circus job,” Miller says.
 
At the Institute of Social Circus, clowns will become Circus Wellness Specialists, who will make people laugh, but also try to bring humanity to the hospital. For the past four years, Circus Mojo has had a contract with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to dispense Mojo Medicine. Performers work as Circus Wellness Specialists to reduce anxiety in patients and their families, and work to build hospital staff morale.
 
In 2012, Miller and a group of international partners purchased the former Duro Bag headquarters from the city of Ludlow with the help of a $10,000 contribution from Duke Energy. The building will become the Institute, and will be a block and a half from the Circus Mojo theater, which was an old movie theater built in 1946. Miller purchased the historic building from the city of Ludlow for $1 four years ago.
 
The Ludlow Fire Department did all of the demolition on the theater, which saved Miller thousands of dollars; they’re going to do the demo on the Institute as well.
 
“The idea of a private/public partnership in the city of Ludlow is if a clown buys a theater, the fire department does the demo,” Miller says. “It’s a unique way to get things done, and it really helped me out.”
 
Miller also hopes to offer jobs to the hundreds of circus performers who are without jobs. He’s had people from 15 different countries come and stay at the Circus Mojo apartment next door to the movie theater. Miller says about 30 other countries use clowns in hospitals to distract patients during treatment, which saves a fortune for health care organizations.

“I want to send kids home with new skills, not just a cast, scar or prescription,” Miller says.
 
Miller is currently looking for investors for the low-profit, limited-liability Institute.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Bike-themed coffee and ice pop shop opens in Newport

Carabello Coffee’s Roasting Works and Craft Coffee Bar had its grand opening last Tuesday in Newport. The business is owned by husband-and-wife team Justin and Emily Carabello, who started roasting coffee in 2009 in their garage in a popcorn popper.
 
For the past two years, Carabello Coffee was roasted at Velocity Bike & Bean in Florence, but with the opening of their own 600-square-foot space, the Carabellos are able to offer more to their customers. The craft coffee bar serves Italian-style craft espresso drinks and cold-brewed ice coffee that is steeped in cold water for 20 hours. The Carabellos also hope to offer weekly tastings and classes on roasting and brewing coffee.
 
The Carabellos are passionate about serving Fair Trade, organic, farm-direct and direct-relationship coffees. Farm-direct is a way for coffee roasters to buy straight from the farmers at a price that is a minimum of 100 percent higher than Fair Trade pricing, which ensures that the farmers are paid a price that will allow them to improve their businesses.
 
Carabello Coffee serves one true farm-direct coffee from Nicaragua that is harvested by Louis Balladarez, a pastor and coffee farmer.
 
“We’re able to serve a coffee that no one else in the world has, and tell the farmer’s story,” Justin says. “We’ve been to visit him three times and know him personally.”
 
Since 2009, the Carabellos have used part of their coffee profits to fund works of compassion in Third World coffee-producing nations. They support an orphanage in Nicaragua on a monthly basis, and have had the opportunity to visit the children there four times in the past three years. They’re also supporting work among HIV orphans in Kenya with their Africa Project coffee—$3 of every bag bought goes to fund the project.
 
“We’ve used coffee as a fundraiser on a local level for everything from the fine arts program at Miami Valley Christian Academy to home school co-ops to the Ohio Valley Cat Rescue,” Justin says. “We really want to put our money where our mouth is. We’ve been able to give back since the beginning, rather than have a goal of helping organizations later.”
 
Carabello Coffee is served at Metropole in the 21c Hotel, Gigi’s Cupcakes in Kenwood, the Queen City Club and Velocity Bike & Bean. It’s also sold in retail shops around the city, including the Anderson and Madeira farmers markets. Some local churches serve the Carabello’s coffee too.
 
The roasting works is also home to Bello’s Ice Pops, which was started by Emily in 2012 after visits to New York City. She came home and started trying her hand at ice pops for fun, and realized she could make a good side business out of her hobby.
 
“I watched "Nefarious," which is a movie about human trafficking, and I thought the money I made from selling ice pops would be a good way to help,” Emily says.
 
While on vacation in Portland, Emily met a man who makes icicle tricycles, which is a three-wheel bicycle with an insulated basket in front. She purchased one, and has been a fixture at local farmers markets, weddings and the Oakley Fancy Flea ever since.
 
“I’m hopeful to see lots of families come into the roasting works next summer and not only try our coffee, but our ice pops too,” Emily says.
 
The Carabellos are excited to be part of the Newport community and can’t wait to see the changes that are in the works for the neighborhood.
 
“We want to be a place in the community that people feel is theirs,” Justin says.
 
Follow Carabello Coffee on Facebook (Carabello Coffee), Twitter (@CarabelloCoffee) and Instagram (#carabellocoffee).
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Fortvna chocolate shop coming to Covington

Chef William Poole and his partner Loren Penton moved to Covington last November, with plans to purchase an existing company. The deal fell through, but they decided to stay. And hopefully by next fall, Poole will open his own chocolate shop, Chocolatier Fortvna.
 
“The Ohio Valley is rich in history, culture and food—it’s a very well-kept secret,” Poole says. “Amazing things are happening on both sides of the river, and I want to be part of it.”
 
Before they moved to the Tri-State, Poole owned a chocolate shop in Denver for about 10 years. When his lease was up in 2010, Poole and Penton moved to New Orleans, where they purchased an old hotel that had been destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. They restored it back to its 1860s splendor, then sold it in October 2012. They then moved to Oregon, which is where Poole thought he would open another chocolate shop, but the food scene was different than in Denver and New Orleans, and things didn’t work out.
 
“The opportunity in Covington arose, and when I initially came here, I fell in love with the area,” Poole says. “I feel like I fit in here, and I’m at the right place at the right time—look at the redevelopment in Over-the-Rhine, the Newport Levee, increased river commerce and plans for the streetcar. It’s very exciting.”
 
Poole and Penton purchased 11 E. Fifth St., the former Bottoms Up bar, as Red Mare Holdings. The building is considered a historic landmark, and Poole plans to restore it to its 1905 splendor. The storefront is currently bricked over, and the interior will be completely gutted in order to create the vision Poole has for his shop.
 
Fortvna’s interior will match the age of the building, and the storefront will be reminiscent of a turn-of-the-century candy shop. The fixtures will be new, but Poole plans to reuse two large gas chandeliers from his restored house on Scott Boulevard. The other fixtures will be steampunk and industrial, but still old-school, Poole says.
 
The building is three stories, with the 1,000-square-foot storefront on the first floor and two 1900s apartments on the second and third floors. Fortvna’s renovation will take about eight months, which will be underway as soon as a leak in the roof is repaired and mold is removed.
 
“I want to help solidify the sense of community here in Covington with my shop,” he says. “I want to help bring back what once was a very commerce-driven town, and is now becoming that again with the people from all over who are selling their craft, talent and art for everyone.”
 
The shop’s chocolate selection will be a mixture of both in-house made and imported items because Poole believes that if he can’t make a sweet better than someone else can, why not bring it to his shop and support another business. Poole plans to have chocolate bars with inclusions, rare origin chocolates and truffles. He also wants to introduce couture items in the spring and fall to keep customers interested.
 
“I won’t be following trends, but creating them,” Poole says. “I feel that I’m very innovative, and I tend to be ahead of other confectioners. I don’t believe in competition because I think everyone needs to do their own thing and encourage customers to try other people’s chocolates.”
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Third annual ArtWorks Box Truck Carnival brings free entertainment to MidPoint Music Festival

This weekend, MidPoint Music Festival makes its way back to Cincinnati. Music will fill Cincinnati venues, and the MidPoint Midway will take over 12th Street between Vine and Walnut with food, drinks and street festivities, including the ArtWorks Box Truck Carnival, ArtCars and KidPoint.
 
The free event features 10 box trucks, which are transformed from ordinary Penske moving trucks into whimsical, engaging “carnival booths” to fit with this year’s theme. The booths range from karaoke to a how-to on screenprinting.

The idea for the Box Truck Carnival came from ArtWorks’ CEO Tamara Harkavy. She heard of enterprise-based pop-up box truck festivals in San Francisco and Brooklyn, and thought it would be a great way to get ArtWorks involved in MPMF, says Sarah Corlett, director of creative enterprise at ArtWorks and producer of the Box Truck Carnival.
 
“For the first two years ArtWorks was involved in MidPoint, the box trucks were focused on artist installations and interactions,” she says. “But this year, they’re really focused on the carnival theme, and the participants are really playing it up.”
 
Participants include Crane, Neidhard & Stock; House of Leigh; Vincent Holiday, Bombs Away! Comedy, OTR Improv and Lofty Aspirations; Kathleen Rose; Paint by the Glass and Andy Mushaben; Powerhouse Print Lab; The Bird Haus; Grace Dobush, Michelle Taute, Tricia Bateman and Julie Hill; Collective Espresso and Chase Public; and the Kennedy Heights Arts Center.
 
“The introduction of the Box Truck Festival gives us the chance to interact with different artists,” Corlett says. “The biggest benefit is that we now have a deeper connection in the community by offering the box trucks.”
 
Amanda Crane of Crane, Neidhard & Stock (a group of second-year interior design and architecture students at DAAP) are running the Games box truck. They wanted people to engage in a “task” of some kind, which fits well with the carnival theme.
 
“We’re hoping to have a great time, while getting to know Cincinnati better,” Crane says. “We’re also excited to be collaborating with ArtWorks and the other box trucks.”
 
ArtWorks also moved ArtCars from Clifton’s Streetscape festival to the Midway for this year. The live art event employs more apprentices and professional artists than ever before—during the course of the three-day music festival, they transform cars and vans into mobile pieces of art.
 
This is the first year that MPMF and ArtWorks partnered for KidPoint, which is a family-friendly event from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday. School of Rock Mason will be performing, as well as other bands. Plus, Cincinnati Ballet’s Second Company will be performing pieces of the Ballet’s "Carnival of Animals."
 
“Having something so unique and visible in the city is a huge shout-out for Cincinnati,” Corlett says. “It’s not just a fun place to play, but everyone who is participating lives and works here, too.”
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Work Flow brings yoga to the office, stretching minds and limbs together

Need a stress reliever for you and your employees? Try Work Flow Yoga, the yoga studio that comes to you.
 
Meredith Amann, owner of Work Flow, moved back to her hometown of Cincinnati in December after spending about six years in San Francisco, two years in Philadelphia and three months in New York. In March, she started SpringBoard Cincinnati and finished in May—she launched Work Flow in June.
 
Work Flow classes are based in the tradition of Ashtanga and Hatha yoga, and they focus on safe alignment and maintaining the connection to your breathing. The sessions are non-competitive and are designed for beginners and those with more experience. They are 30-60 minutes and can be held once or twice a week in your workplace.
 
“It’s nice to have flexibility in terms of me coming to them,” says Amann. “It’s one person traveling as opposed to a group of people—and it’s one car on the road instead of 20.”
 
When Amann decided to pursue her yoga training and move to Cincinnati, she thought about a brick-and-mortar studio. But she decided she wanted to offer yoga to those who sat at their desks all day long, and a traveling studio made more sense for that.
 
To date, Amann has taught yoga classes at a handful of small nonprofit companies. If you’re interested in having a class taught at your office, call 513-370-9088 or email Amann at meredith@yogaworkflow.com to schedule a meeting.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter
283 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts