| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Vimeo RSS Feed

Entrepreneurship : Development News

459 Entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All

Local couple brings Wiedemann beer back to Newport

Next spring, Newport will once again be home to the Geo. Wiedemann Brewing Co., which closed and moved to Evansville, Ind., in 1983. But local Jon Newberry is bringing the brand back to Northern Kentucky, and will operate out of a 10,000-square-foot space in WaterTower Square.    
 
“I want to bring some of the good times people remember back to the area,” Newberry says. “There’s more nightlife in Newport, we want to add to it, and bring people from Ohio here, expanding the brewery trail development that’s going on over there.”
 
George Wiedemann founded the brewery in 1870, and under his direction it grew to be the largest in Kentucky. Heilemann Brewing, a Wisconsin company, purchased Wiedemann in 1967, and operated the brewery in Newport until 1983.
 
At the time, Heilemann was purchasing a number of regional breweries, and decided to move Wiedemann to the old Sterling Brewery in Evansville, but it shut down in the 1990s. Pittsburgh Brewing then acquired the rights to the Wiedemann brand and made the beer until 2006, when they filed for bankruptcy.
 
The trademark rights to Wiedemann had expired, so Newberry applied for the rights. When he brought the brand back, he introduced a new beer, Wiedemann Special Lager. Wiedemann is currently available in stores and restaurants throughout the Greater Cincinnati area, including Pompilio’s in Newport and Mecklenburg Gardens.
 
The new brewery will have a large taproom with about 12 Wiedemann beers on tap, and will serve food as well. Newberry also wants to offer tours and host beer-related events. There will also be an outdoor biergarten with a bar that will be set up in the building’s existing courtyard.
 
“This will be the third brewery in Newport, and people have been really encouraging and are excited to have some Newport pride back,” Newberry says.

Plans are still in the works, but Newberry hopes to have construction underway by next month.

Frameshop opens Workshop in Walnut Hills

Frameshop recently moved the back end of its framing business to 700 E. McMillan in Walnut Hills. It’s in the same building as Beck Paint and Hardware, and will allow Frameshop the space to do the woodwork and finishing on pieces.
 
Co-owner Jake Baker says they ran out of space to make frames at the Over-the-Rhine location, and needed a place where they could test out their services and maybe develop new products.
 
“We were looking for new opportunities to work with wood,” Baker says. “Walnut Hills is looking to change the dynamic of the neighborhood, and we’re excited about that.”
 
Workshop will be housed in a 1,100-square-foot space on the first floor of the building, but they’re also testing out the third floor, which is about 2,000 square feet. It will solely be a workshop, and Frameshop will continue to offer retail options, with hours from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and appointments during the week.
 
Baker says they might take appointments at Workshop, as there are customers who like to see the whole framing process, but that’s still up in the air.
 
Frameshop is expanding in other ways, too. Since opening in 2012, they hired two employees, both graduates of the Art Academy of Cincinnati. They also opened a location in Lexington last September, with the intention of moving to a new space in January. The lease at the new location fell through, so Baker and partner Jake Gerth decided to focus on Cincinnati and the new Workshop.
 
“Being active in Walnut Hills and OTR is going to allow us to get to know a new set of people, and introduce each neighborhood to a new set of people,” Baker says. “We’re ambassadors for business and the neighborhood of OTR, and we want to do that for Walnut Hills too.

New movie theater concept to offer classics and cocktails

Jacob Trevino’s heart is in craft cocktails—he works at Japp’s—but his other passion is movies. About six months ago, he started trying to find a way to combine his passions.
 
Trevino has been to movie theaters that serve beer, but he wants to improve upon that idea. His venture, Gorilla Cinema, will feature food and beverages that tie in with the movies being shown.
 
“Gorilla Cinema will be a truly immersive experience that celebrates the films that I love,” he says.

Trevino plans to show mostly classic movies that everyone has seen at least once. And Gorilla Cinema’s menu, which was designed by Chef Martha Tiffany of The Precinct, will feature upscale pub food that will change for special events. It will also reflect what movie is being shown.
 
“There’s something about watching a movie in a theater that you can’t get when you watch it at home,” Trevino says. “There’s something magical about going to the theater and seeing your favorite movie on the big screen. It invokes a kind of nostalgia that our generation really didn’t get to experience.”
 
Trevino is currently looking for a space in Bellevue or Pleasant Ridge to renovate and is seeking investors, but until then, he’s hosting popup events around the city to help build the company. The ideal permanent location for Gorilla Cinema will be in an old movie theater, with seats for 124 people, with space for a front bar and lounge area.
 
“Gorilla Cinema will celebrate the memories that movies bring back, and help recapture some of those memories,” Trevino says. “People talk about having their first kiss in the movie theater. I remember seeing Jaws for the first time. Movies are a weird art form that people remember when they saw something—they’re engrained in our culture.”
 
If you’re interested in a popup movie, Gorilla Cinema is hosting a horror movie double feature, with the original Dracula and House on Haunted Hill with Vincent Price, on Oct. 26 in a parking lot at the corner of Montgomery Road and Ridge Avenue in Pleasant Ridge. Keep tabs on its Facebook page for event information.

Off the Vine brings cold-pressed juices to Cincinnati

A juice bar will soon open in the old 940-square-foot Cincy Haus: American Legacy Tours space on Vine Street in Over-the-Rhine. Off the Vine will offer cold-pressed juices made from local and organic ingredients, when possible.
 
Cold-pressed juice is pressed between hydraulic plates in a juicer, which squeezes out every drop of juice and nutrients from the produce, and leaves a dry pulp behind.
 
Off the Vine’s menu will feature about eight different types of juice, ranging from a green juice to a nut milk-based juice. Juices will range in price from $6-$10, and will have three pounds of produce in each serving. Off the Vine will also sell juices for cleanses, which are $55 per day. Each cleanse package comes with five juices and one nut milk, and are meant for meal replacements.
 
Co-owners and OTR residents Annie McKinney and Cydney Rabe, who owns Core a Movement Studio in OTR, both started drinking juices for different reasons. McKinney is interested in how eating health food affects your daily mood and life, so she started drinking cold-pressed juice.
 
“You’re getting raw, living nutrients from cold-pressed juice that you can’t get from eating raw produce,” she says. “Plus, when you feel better, you treat other people better. It’s almost like a pay-it-forward mentality.”
 
When Rabe started doing Pilates, she looked at what she was eating and how she was treating her body, and decided that juicing would be the fastest way to get all of the nutrients she needed in one sitting.
 
Rabe says juicing can be frustrating because you see all of the produce that you’re throwing out. But with cold-pressed juices, you’re not wasting anything.
 
Off the Vine will offer some fruit-based juices for those who are just getting into juicing, as well as green juices and nut milks for more seasoned juice drinkers.
 
When Off the Vine opens in late October, its hours will be Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
 

Food truck association to host street food festival

The Cincinnati Food Truck Association will host its first event, the CFTA Food Fest, from 4 to 10 p.m. on Oct. 4 at Washington Park. The event will feature beer, live music and food from 19 CFTA members.

CFTA members can be found at events all over the city, as can non-CFTA members. But this is the first time for a CFTA-exclusive event. All members were invited to Food Fest, but some won't be there due to prior commitments.
 
“CFTA members have been wanting to do our own festival since the beginning,” says Elizabeth Romero, president of CFTA and co-owner of SugarSnap! “We’re hoping the event will increase the buzz around town and give people a chance to try new and different trucks.”
 
Traditionally, Washington Park has been a great place for food trucks to set up for events like the City Flea and LumenoCity. So it made sense to have the CFTA event there too.
 
“It’s a great place to bring the community together,” Romero says. “It brings great vibes, and it has the room for a large number of trucks.”
 
Food Fest will feature beer served by 3CDC, music spun by D.J. Nate the Great, cornhole and giant Jenga.
 
CFTA members will be serving up everything from pizza and burgers to cupcakes and ice cream. Trucks that will be at the event include: Bistro de Mohr, C’est Cheese, Cuban Pete, East Coast Eatz, Eclectic Comfort Food, Falafel Mobile, Mobile Coldstone, Panino, Pizza Tower, Quite Frankly, Red Sesame, Streetpops, SugarSnap!, Texas Joe, The Chili Hut, Ricco Food Truck, Roll With It Café, Waffo and Wiggy Dip.  
 
CFTA’s goal is to host two events per year, and possibly make Food Fest an annual tradition in Cincinnati. The group also hopes to work with local bands, breweries and nonprofits in the future to give their events a wider scope.

Simple Space to offer pop-up and event space in OTR

Over-the-Rhine residents Levi and Heather Bethune are opening a pop-up and event space on the first-floor of their home. Simple Space, located at 16 E. 13th St., will be available for everything from a pop-up store to a party space.
 
“Simple Space will be kind of like an extension of our living room,” Bethune says. “One of the reasons my wife and I decided to move our family into an urban environment is so we can influence, affect and contribute to the heart of the city. We believe that we can have an impact through Simple Space, but also through our home. Every tenant that rents out the space will be considered a guest in our home, and hopefully a friend in our city.”
 
The 600-square-foot space is an empty shell, and will be undergoing renovations soon. The Bethunes hope to have their first tenants in before Christmas, and will open the building to reservations in March.
 
Over the last two years, Bethune has met many vendors and creators at events like the City Flea and Second Sunday on Main. He’s talked to several people who are interested in using the space, including Julie Otten from Shoppe Class, who could use Simple Space for craft speciality lessons; Nick Elbi from Zip Zoo Apparrel, who might do a T-shirt pop-up shop; and Blake Smith from the local start-up Cladwell, who has talked about using Simple Space for a custom fitting and personalized men’s shopping experience.
 
“Simple Space is a container, an empty box,” Bethune says. “It’s not about what I want to happen in there, it’s about what you want to happen in there.”
 
Simple Space is currently looking for investors to help with renovations and signage. You can donate to the Indiegogo campaign here.  
 

Empanadas Aqui brings Hispanic food to Cincinnati streets

After tossing around the idea of a food truck at a family gathering, husband-and-wife team Brett and Dadni Johnson and Brett’s aunt, Pat Fettig, joined Bad Girl Ventures. They won the competition, and started serving up empanadas on their food truck, Empanadas Aqui, in June.
 
“We decided on empanadas because we wanted to bring them to Cincinnati,” Fettig says.
 
Dadni, who is from Caracas, comes up with the recipes; Brett worked for Dewey’s Pizza for two years, and was on the management track. And although Fettig doesn’t have a culinary background, she says she's the one who cooks for family events.
 
Empanadas Aqui’s rotating menu features a few staples, including the signature Bad Girl, which is shredded chicken, sautéed onions, peppers, cheese and a house blend of seasoning; and the Popeye, which has spinach inside. Dessert options include the Emporeo, which has crushed Oreos and cream cheese topped with a sweet glaze, and a guava and cream cheese filled empanada.
 
Empanadas Aqui will be at the City Flea this month and next, as well as the Midwest Food Truck Show and the Hispanic Festival at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds. Next year, they want to be at LumenoCity and the Taste of Cincinnati.
 
The truck is also available for private parties, with a wider offering of food items.
 
“We hope to bring something different to the city,” Fettig says. “There are almost 10,000 Hispanics in the area, and we’re bringing a familiar food to them, as well as introducing other people to something new.”
 
Follow Empanadas Aqui on Facebook and Twitter @empanadasaqui.
 

Neighborhood bar and bottle shop serving this September in OTR

Garth Lieb, Jeremy Moore and Tom Stephen are no strangers to the Over-the-Rhine bar scene. Not only do they frequent them, but they’ve worked at a handful as well. And this September, the trio will be opening a bar of their own, Liberty’s Bar & Bottle.
 
The 1,000-square-foot space, which was formerly a condo, will feature 20 rotating taps, wine by the glass, and beer and a selection of wine to-go. Liberty’s will focus more on European craft beer and wine than local offerings, but you can be sure there will be a few of those as well.
 
“The American craft beer movement has pushed everyone around the world to experiment with different types of hops, fruits and barreling processes,” Stephen says. “It’s really pushed Europe to keep up and play around with the fun stuff.”
 
The bar’s wine program will be made up of Old World wines, but there will be a few from California and Oregon as well. There will also be a small liquor selection with a very small list of well-picked bourbons and scotches, and a vodka, gin and tequila option.
 
Meat and cheese plates will be available as well for light bites, featuring goods from local purveyors.
 
Liberty’s copper topped, walnut bar is original to the building. Eighteen bar stools, a few drink rails and a beer hall-style table will round out the seating. Eight French doors open onto the sidewalk, which Stephen says will make it feel like you’re outside.
 
When Liberty’s opens, there will be a few special beers that lots of people probably haven’t had on draft in Ohio. After unveiling the taps, Stephen says they’ll unveil a 20-foot tall mural painted by local artist Alex Scherra.
 
“We want Liberty’s to be a neighborhood bar, and with that, we want to feature local art,” Stephen says.
 
Scherra will also be creating pieces of art for the bar’s chalkboards that were salvaged from a 1902 schoolhouse in Connecticut. The artwork will change over time, and will feature hops and wine regions from around the world.
 

Macaron-focused bakery opening this fall in OTR

Cincinnati natives Patrick Moloughney and Nathan Sivitz lived in LA for a year, where they realized macarons—flavored ganache or cream sandwiched between two almond meringue cookies—are the next cupcake. So Moloughney, a former brand manager at P&G, and Sivitz, a trained pastry chef, are bringing the French sweet to Cincinnati.
 
“Macarons are delicate and light, and temperamental to make,” Sivitz says. “They’re difficult for the home baker to make, so we thought a shop dedicated to macarons would be perfect for the neighborhood.”
 
Macaron Bar is slated to open in November in a 1,400-square-foot space at 1206 Main St. in Over-the-Rhine, next to Park + Vine. The OTR location will primarily be a takeaway kitchen, so customers can grab a treat on the way to work or on the way home.
 
The shop will have a minimalist and contemporary look and feel, with lots of white laminate materials and a glass wall separating the kitchen from the front of the house. The white walls will make the colorful macarons pop, Sivitz says.
 
The shop’s menu will feature classic flavors like chocolate, pistachio and salted caramel, with seasonal flavors like pumpkin and peppermint. All of the macarons will be gluten-free and Kosher certified. Macaron Bar will also offer a limited selection of coffee from Deeper Roots and loose-leaf tea from Essencha Tea House.
 
Moloughney and Sivitz picture the OTR location to be the flagship store, and they plan to open several satellite shops around town that will be retail-only stores supplied by the OTR kitchen.
 
The guys are also committed to the community—three percent of the profits from Macaron Bar will go to nonprofits in the OTR area.
 
“We want a way to give back,” Moloughney says, who has served on the board of several community organizations, including Community Shares and GLSEN. “Volunteering and being involved are very important to us.”
 
 

Another food truck on the horizon in Cincinnati

John Humphrey’s parents opened the first Zino’s restaurant in 1965 in Norwood, and more were soon to follow in Clifton, Hyde Park, Short Vine, Kenwood Mall, Milford and Walnut Hills. The restaurants closed in the mid-1990s, and now Humphrey plans to bring some of Zino’s menu back to the city with his food truck, Zinomobile.
 
“I grew up working at my parents’ restaurants,” Humphrey says. “My sister and foster brothers worked there too, as well as our friends. It was hard to find someone who didn’t eat at, work at or know someone who worked at Zino’s.”
 
Humphrey, who trained at the Culinary Institute of America in New York, recently purchased the former Taco Azul truck, and will have a Kickstarter campaign to raise a portion of the remaining funds for Zinomobile.
 
The food truck’s menu will feature the Zinover, which is a deep-fried pizza turnover (think deep-fried calzone), filled with cheese, marinara sauce and your choice of ingredients. The rest of the menu will be rounded out with Zino’s originals, but Humphrey says he might eventually tweak a few things.
 
“I want to blend the older generation with the newer generation and bring in different food concepts,” Humphrey says.
 
Humphrey is a member of the Cincinnati Food Truck Association, and says that someday, he might want to expand his food truck and open a restaurant.
 
“I don’t have any idea where I would want to put a restaurant, but it seems to be the natural progression for many food truck owners,” he says. “Compared to 15 years ago, it’s amazing what’s available now.”
 
Zinomobile will be available for private parties, and be looking for the truck at business parks around town, as well as in entertainment hotspots with nightlife in the coming weeks. Humphrey also hopes to be at farmers markets and large events like Bunbury Music Festival; Red, White & Blue Ash; and Taste of Cincinnati.


Read more about Cincinnati's growing food truck scene in 30 Must-Try Cincinnati Food Trucks.

Cross-stitch and embroidery shop new to OTR

The Hoop & Needle, a cross-stitch and embroidery shop, had its grand opening during Over-the-Rhine’s Second Sunday in June.
 
The 750-square-foot shop boasts cross-stitch and embroidery supplies, including modern and edgy patterns, kits and accessories. There’s also an online shop, which will carry many of the same offerings as the brick-and-mortar store.
 
The Hoop & Needle’s owner and sole employee, Sarah Fisher, hopes to eventually offer classes. She’ll be hosting the first “Stitch Night” from 6 to 9 p.m. on Aug. 7, where people can bring in their projects and work on them.
 
“I want to provide a place where people can explore something new, and try out something different,” Fisher says. “I’ve found that lots of people who live in OTR used to do cross-stitch or embroidery, and this is a way to make the hobby more approachable and help people get back into it.”
 
Fisher, an Akron native who now lives in Northside, started creating her own cross-stitch patterns a few years ago, and sold them as Purple Hippo Stitches at craft shows, including the Crafty Supermarket. The Hoop & Needle is an extension of that, and it happened a lot faster than she was expecting.
 
“I started looking at spaces, and this seemed like the perfect space,” she says. “There are other art stores in OTR like Rock Paper Scissors, and it seemed like a friendly community to start a business in.”
 
The Hoop & Needle, located at 1415 Main St., is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday.
 

Explore OTR cards offer arts patrons perks for visiting nearby restaurants and retail

Over-the-Rhine arts organization Elementz recently produced Explore OTR cards, which will drive business from the arts to restaurants and retail in the neighborhood. The cards are based on a concept seen in Kentucky where groups of businesses get together and create a process to get customers to go to the businesses.
 
“The cards are for people who might come to OTR for arts events, but who don’t think of the neighborhood as a place to stay and shop,” says Tom Kent, executive director of Elementz.
 
Explore OTR cards are free, and will be handed out by smaller arts organizations after performances—the Art Academy of Cincinnati, Art Beyond Boundaries, the Cincinnati Boychoir, Elementz and Know Theatre.
 
Patrons can then visit up to five of the 21 businesses listed on the card and get them initialed. Park + Vine, Rhinehaus, the YMCA, The Anchor Restaurant in Washington Park, Taste of Belgium and Sweet Sistah Splash are just a few of the diverse restaurants and retail options that are participating in the Explore OTR cards.
 
Once they’ve visited five businesses, patrons can redeem the cards at larger arts organizations such as American Legacy Tours, the Cincinnati Ballet, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Ensemble Theatre and Know Theatre for deals like 20 percent off tickets for the Queen City Underground Tour and buy one, get one free tickets at Know Theatre.
 
Each offer has an expiration date, with some expiring in November, others in May, Kent says.
 
“We’re trying to build an alliance between arts organizations and the customers who come to see the shows,” he says. “Local businesses make the neighborhood thrive, and the cards will also help bring in a more diverse audience as membership builds.”
 
Elementz will be collecting the cards after they’re redeemed for the discounts, and keeping track of where people redeemed them and which businesses were visited.
 
The cards are currently being printed, and will be handed out at LumenoCity next weekend.

Columbus-based pretzel shop opening in OTR

An authentic German pretzel shop will soon open its doors in Over-the-Rhine. Columbus-based Brezel will be located in the 565-square-foot space next to Graeter’s at 6 W. 14th Street. 
 
Owner Brittany Baum and her husband, Tim, became pretzel enthusiasts after visiting Germany in 2008.
 
“I’m a vegetarian, and it’s hard to be one in Germany,” Baum says. “I lived off of Bavarian pretzels during our travels.”
 
When she returned to her native Columbus, Baum couldn’t find pretzels that compared to those in Germany. She and a friend spent hours in the kitchen, perfecting their recipe, and sold them at farmers’ markets from 2008-2011. In March 2011, they opened the first Brezel location at Columbus’ North Market.
 
After visiting Cincinnati last August, Baum fell in love with OTR.
 
“It reminded me a lot of the Short North neighborhood in Columbus,” she says. “It has a raw feeling to it. It felt unrefined, artistic and on the verge of self-discovery. I knew I wanted to play a role in creating OTR.”
 
Brezel is best known for its original salt pretzel, but there are 30 different flavors to choose from, including French Onion and Asiago, Peppercorn and Mozzarella, Jalapeno and Cheddar, Roasted Garlic and Cheddar, and Coconut and Almond. The menu includes pretzel twists, pretzel bites and scratch-made dips, as well as buns, soup bowls and pizza crust, which are all made from pretzel dough.
 
“I believe in working with other small businesses to collaborate and create interesting products, and I hope to share that vision with other businesses in OTR,” Baum says.
 
She hopes to open Brezel in time for Oktoberfest, but there is no set date yet. Hours of operation will include mid-morning through the evening, as well as late-night hours on the weekend.
 
“Brezel will be a place for people to grab a quick bite before or after work, as well as late night,” Baum says.

Vintage-inspired clothing store coming to OTR

In 2007, Ryan Vesler founded HOMAGE as a wholesale company that specialized in graphic T-shirts. It has since grown into an online business, then a brick-and-mortar store in Columbus in 2010, and a larger store in 2012. This fall, HOMAGE will open a location in Over-the-Rhine.
 
The 1,500-square foot store, located at 1232 Vine St., will offer the company’s vintage-inspired, U.S.-made graphic tees, sweatshirts, sweatpants and accessories.
 
“We’ve been excited about the Cincinnati market for a long time,” says Jason Block, HOMAGE’s president. “There’s an energetic, enthusiastic fan base here, and our product has resonated with them.”
 
HOMAGE’s Columbus location sports an NBA Jam arcade machine, a Coca-Cola machine, championship banners and memorabilia unique to the city. Block says the OTR location is undergoing some renovations to bring personality to the space, and will probably include some of the details of the Columbus store.
 
The OTR HOMAGE will also offer licensed University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, University of Dayton and University of Miami-Ohio gear.
 
“We want to be part of the community,” Block says. “We want our personality and authenticity to add to what OTR already has to offer.”

Brewery and restaurant concept coming to West Side

The owners of Tom & Jerry’s Sports Bar are adding a microbrewery onto the neighborhood restaurant. Tap and Screw Brewery will take over the restaurant’s dance floor and stage area, and will be open by September.
 
The name Tap and Screw pays homage to three Cincinnati industries: Cincinnati Screw and Tap Company is the original name of Cincinnati Milacron; “Tap” refers to Cincinnati’s brewing industry before Prohibition; and “Screw,” which is short for corkscrew, pays tribute to Ohio’s place as the country’s largest wine producer before the California wine industry started.
 
“There aren’t a lot of options for breweries on the West Side, and we hope to bring that,” says Tom Lorenz, owner of Tom & Jerry’s.
 
Tom and his son, Adam, along with Chuck Frisch, are the masterminds behind Tap and Screw. Adam has been brewing beer at home for about eight years, and will be the head brewer, with Tom as his assistant and Frisch as the general manager.
 
Tap and Screw will start with four of its own beers on tap, including a Belgian, an Oktoberfest and a coffee stout. Eventually, its 12-tap system will have six Tap and Screw beers and six from other local breweries. Tom & Jerry’s currently has a full liquor license, and the Lorenz’s are working on adding a microbrewing license. They will also also offer 8-12 local wines.
 
“We want Tap and Screw to be a unique place where people can get food that they know who made it, and pair it with good beer,” Tom says.
 
The Lorenzs overhauled the menu when they took ownership, and all of the restaurant’s food is now fresh and homemade.
 
The restaurant side of Tap and Screw will continue to serve Tom & Jerry’s goetta balls, which are stuffed with feta cheese, bell peppers, jalapenos and onions, then fried and served with ranch dip. Tom & Jerry’s burgers, salads and wings are also menu staples.
 
Keep tabs on Tap and Screw’s website for updates, and the exact opening date.
 
459 Entrepreneurship Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts