| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Vimeo RSS Feed

Over-the-Rhine : Development News

407 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All

Elm Street Senior Housing expected to be rented out by June

On May 20, a ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held for the Elm Street Senior Housing project in Over-the-Rhine. The 15-unit building will be the neighborhood’s first and only affordable senior housing project.
 
Over-the-Rhine Community Housing led the $4 million redevelopment of the 150-year-old building at Elm and 15th streets.
 
Records indicate that Christian Moerlein built the building to serve as the brewery’s icehouse. It was sold in 1919 during Prohibition, and has since housed a saloon, grocery store, market, restaurant, barber, billiards hall and rental flat.
 
The one-bedroom units are expected to be all leased out by June.
 
Elm Street Senior Housing will have a manager living on-site, and amenities will include a laundry room, a community meeting space, a resident services office, an elevator and a courtyard. The building is expected to seek LEED silver certification.
 
OTR Community Housing worked with Model Group and CR Architects + Design on the project. Cincinnati Area Senior Services will provide support services for residents. The project used state and federal historic tax credits, state low-income housing tax credits and city property tax abatements.
 
To apply for one of the apartments, visit the OTRCH website. Interested applicants must be 62 or older, and income restrictions apply.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

 

Metro issues RFP for streetcar branding

Today, Metro issued a request for proposals for the streetcar’s branding. Proposals are due May 23 at 4 p.m.
 
Earlier this year, the city requested that Metro assume responsibility for the streetcar’s marketing and community education. The branding RFP is a preliminary step toward Metro’s role as the operator of the streetcar.
 
The design of the station stops, vehicles, color scheme, maintenance facility and other physical aspects of the streetcar have been finalized. But the RFP will include the streetcar’s logo and guidelines related to the use that will be needed for everything related to its operations, including vehicles, signs, operators’ uniforms, website and printed materials.
 
All costs for the streetcar branding are being paid for by federal funds, not Metro’s operating budget.
 
To learn more about bid opportunities, including the branding RFP, visit Metro’s website.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

 

New website helps drivers navigate Cincinnati construction

The City of Cincinnati launched a new website last week to help drivers navigate the construction downtown. RoadmapCincy.com highlights construction areas and provides detours to help alleviate traffic.
 
RoadmapCincy focuses on construction in Over-the-Rhine, downtown and along the riverfront. It also aggregates tweets from the city and other organizations so users know what’s happening on the streets around them.
 
In the coming months, downtown will see construction continue or begin on several projects, including the new dunnhumby building on Race Street between Fifth and Sixth streets; a hotel on Walnut Street between Fourth and Fifth streets; streetcar tracks along Central Parkway and soon in downtown; a new apartment tower on top of the parking garage at Seventh and Broadway streets; and a building at Sixth and Walnut streets.
 
Cincinnatians can follow @roadmapcincy on Twitter for the latest updates.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

 

Eli's Barbeque, Maverick Chocolate opening at Findlay Market

Two new businesses, Eli’s Barbeque and Maverick Chocolate, will soon be opening on Elder Street at Findlay Market. Both businesses signed three-year agreements for their respective spaces.
 
Eli’s BBQ got its start at the market years ago, and the new permanent location will be open until 9 p.m. six days a week. Maverick Chocolate is a craft chocolate maker that produces product direct from cocoa beans. It will be the first bean-to-bar chocolate company in Ohio.
 
The market’s main goal is to increase foot traffic and business activity on the south side of the market, and improve visibility for existing businesses like Saigon Market. In the coming months, additional storefronts will be built out on the south side, and all storefronts on that side are expected to be occupied, except Luken’s cold storage building and the Mr. Pig building.
 
There are also plans to bring in a café for one of the market’s more prominent spaces at the corner of Race and Elder.
 
The two new businesses follow a months-long renovation of three storefronts, 129-133 Elder St., on the south side of the market. Each space is about 1,000 square feet, and were made possible by a $500,000 contribution from the city’s Department of Trade & Development.
 
Findlay Market is still looking to fill the third storefront. If you’re interested in leasing it, please contact Joe Hansbauer or call 513-604-7567.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

 

Cincinnati landmarks receive state money for renovations, updates

Every two years, the state of Ohio issues bonds for its capital budget in order to support the renovations and updates of local buildings, schools, roads, sewers, prisons and parks. Earlier this winter, the Cincinnati Business Committee recommended projects that would help educate and train the state’s workforce to the governor.
 
Due to the recession, the state wasn’t able to issue these bonds fromm 2007-2012, but resurrected them for colleges and universities in 2013-2014. This year is the first since 2006 that the state has been able to allocate money to community projects.
 
Cincinnati’s Music Hall and the Cincinnati Museum Center’s Union Terminal are to each receive $5 million of Ohio’s $2.4 billion capital budget to get renovations underway, if the legislature approves the governor’s request to issue long-term bonds for money to improve universities and community buildings. The decision is going before the General Assembly this spring.
 
But state money won’t come close to covering the $275 million needed to update both Music Hall and Union Terminal. Music Hall, which was built in 1878, is in need of $95 million worth of renovations; Union Terminal, which is 80 years old, uses an outdated heating and air conditioning system, and needs $180 million in repairs.
 
In all, the state’s capital budget includes $675 million for local school buildings; $454.4 million for renovations at public colleges and universities; $369 million for road and sewer improvements; $574.3 million for state-owned buildings at prisons and parks; and $100 million for the Clean Ohio program to preserve farmland, trails and green space.
 
The state-owned Aronoff Center for the Arts theater and Hamilton County Memorial Hall will each get $2 million for renovations. Another $4 million will go to the future parking garage south of Freedom Way at The Banks. The University of Cincinnati will get $28.8 million for its ongoing Medical Sciences Building project, and Miami University will get $21 million to renovate Shideler Hall.
 
Cincinnati Zoo will get $2 million, and West Chester’s Voice of America MetroPark will get $1 million to build an athletic complex for regional and national tournaments.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Workshops to help with ins and outs of OTR homeownership

A series of workshops on homeownership in Over-the-Rhine will take place this spring. The series aims to bring together relevant resources and expertise to better educate potential homebuyers.
 
Owner-Occupied Over-the-Rhine, which is sponsored by the OTR Foundation, will cover everything from selecting the right property to financing to navigating the specific needs of a historic property and historic district.
 
The Foundation’s goal is to make it easier for individuals and families to rehabilitate buildings in OTR, the Brewery District or Pendleton by educating them about what redevelopment in a neighborhood entails, and helping them make connections to successfully complete a project.
 
The workshops will be held at 8 a.m. on April 12, May 10 and June 14 at the Art Academy of Cincinnati in OTR. Registration is $50 for all three sessions. You can register for the series here.
 
April 12’s session is titled “Learning from those who have gone before you.” Attendees will learn from other owner-occupants who have successfully renovated buildings, and tour completed or in-process projects. The second session, “You have a property, where do you begin?” will deal with choosing and purchasing a building, preparation for renovation, choosing a team, preserving historic properties, and laws and regulations. The final session, “Do the numbers add up and if they don’t, what do you do?" will touch on financing options that are available to owner-occupants.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Underground dining experience expanding to restaurant, urban market

Hen of the Woods’ owners Nick and Kim Marckwald started out doing underground dining experiences with family and friends in 2012, but it quickly grew into something much bigger. They’ve done the Over-the-Rhine farmers market, Findlay Market, private events and pop-up brunches. And in the next year, Hen of the Woods will have a physical restaurant space in the old J.B. Schmidt building in OTR.
 
“We looked everywhere for a space,” Nick says. “Nothing felt right until we found this building on Main. We knew it would let us reach our fullest potential. And Main is the next phase of the OTR scene, and it fits our personality and energy.”
 
J.B. Schmidt occupied the building for about 100 years. The contracting company left in 2012, and Urban Sites purchased it, but it’s been vacant since then.
 
The space, which includes the storefronts at 1432 and 1434 Main St., is just under 10,000 square feet. In the 1970s, the three-story building at 1432 was partially torn down and a warehouse was built by the city to house the drainage lines before they put them under OTR streets, and Schmidt eventually acquired it. It’s connected to 1434, which is a shed-type building with many different pockets, Nick says.
 
The first floor of 1432 will be HOTW’s urban market (beer and wine to-go, prepared food, an old-school butcher shop, smoothies, coffee, tea) and the second floor will be an extension of the dining room, overlooking Main Street. The Marckwald’s offices will be located on the third floor of the building. The “shed” will become a large dining room, bar and three-season patio with seating for 50-60.
 
HOTW’s serves modern American cuisine with a farm-to-table aesthetic.
 
“We like to take American classics and bend them on their ear,” Kim says. “We do lots of surprising touches and like to celebrate every element of whatever we’re using.”
 
The Marckwalds met in Colorado nine years ago, where Nick was an executive chef and Kim was bartending at the same restaurant. They’ve eaten their way through New York City and Chicago, and love to look at the menus, drinks, clientele and décor of the places they go. HOTW will showcase what’s important to them: service, presentation, fun and, of course, food.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Entrepreneur opens clothing and accessory boutique in OTR

After living in New York City for 11 years, Libby Andress came to Cincinnati and decided it was time to open her own boutique. LIBBY, a clothing and accessory shop, opened in fall 2013 in Over-the-Rhine.
 
“I’ve always been a boutique shopper, their imagination just amazes me,” Andress says.
 
The 600-square-foot, single-employee shop sells clothing and accessories, including handmade and custom jewelry and repairs. In the future, Andress hopes to offer other items like home goods, candles, perfume and fine jewelry.
 
Andress mainly sources her inventory from New York City and Los Angeles, where fashion is on the forefront. Her goal is to provide accessible shopping options that are on the pulse of the newest fashion being produced around the world.
 
“I stock off-brand fast fashion, which is a burgeoning market in fashion,” she says. “The market is inspired by all branches of the fashion industry. For example, it’s just begun to explore sustainable fashion, and I sell some clothes made from bamboo to reflect that.”
 
LIBBY is open Thursday through Saturday from noon to 7 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. You can visit her Etsy shop here.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Local brewer paying homage to Taft with new brewery, restaurant

There will soon be a new brewery on the scene in Over-the-Rhine. Kevin Moreland, former head brewer at Listermann/Triple Digit Brewing Company, is opening Taft’s Ale House in the historic St. Paul’s Church complex.
 
Built in the 1850s, the church has been abandoned since the ’80s. The city acquired the church and attempted to repair it, but the funds were never there. 3CDC bought it in 2010 for $350,000, and later made about $450,000 worth of structural repairs, including a new roof and some internal work.
 
Several other tenants were considered for the space, including offices and other commercial options.  
 
Taft’s Ale House pays homage to the 27th President of the United States and Cincinnati native William Howard Taft. The $8 million brewery is looking to open this fall or winter.
 
Taft’s beer will be made from locally sourced ingredients and is inspired by OTR restaurants, bars and specialty food retailers. There will be 12 beers on tap—three staples chosen by patrons, and the others will rotate seasonally. There will also be a menu with pub fare, which will include tri-tip steak sandwiches.
 
All three floors of the church will be utilized by Taft’s. The first floor, or Big Billy’s Basement, will house the brewery’s barrel-aged projects and rotating taps of local beer. The second floor will be the main beer hall with a view of the entire brewing process, including the eight 20BBL fermenters and eight 20BBL serving vessels behind the bar, separated by a catwalk. The third floor, or Brauzzine, will be the dining room that overlooks the beer hall.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter


Sam Adams brewery expanding OTR location

In June, the city approved plans to develop a brewery district in Over-the-Rhine. Part of that district includes the expansion of the Sam Adams brewery.
 
Cincinnati is one of three places in the country to brew Sam Adams beer.
 
Sam Adams is planning a 6,700-square-foot expansion of its Central Parkway facility. The brewery will be putting $6 million of improvements into the facility, with $3.5 million toward building new beer storage and $2.3 million in new beer storage tanks.
 
The brewery, whose build-out is being handled by Cincinnati-based Reece-Campbell Inc., will hold 14 large tanks with the space for six more tanks to be added; nine tanks will be added to the bottling and packaging facility.
 
Sam Adams is currently hiring eight positions, including a project engineer and brewing operator.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Senate, Abigail Street owners opening third restaurant

Over-the-Rhine restaurateurs Daniel and Lana Wright are looking to open their third restaurant, Pontiac Bourbon and BBQ, at 1403 Vine St. this summer.
 
The Wrights, owners of Senate and Abigail Street, plan to focus Pontiac’s menu on barbeque favorites such as Texas brisket, Memphis-style ribs, Alabama-style chicken and Frito pie. The bar will be stocked with a variety of bourbon, whiskey and beer; there will also be a choice of sodas from the Wrights childhood.
 
Pontiac will have seating for about 60, and will offer take-out options by-the-pound. It will be open for lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Go Dutch design firm moves to OTR

In May, brand design firm Go Dutch will move from Covington to its new home across the river. Its new location will be in the Emanuel Center Building at 1380 Race St. in Over-the-Rhine.
 
The firm will occupy a 4,600-square-foot space on the third floor. The move will allow Go Dutch to hire additional employees to add to its current staff of 10.
 
Formerly the Emanuel Community Center, the 143-year-old building was converted into office space for entrepreneurs by Grandin Properties.
 
Go Dutch, which was founded in 2011 by a group of former Landor employees, is doing most of the space design work themselves. The firm is working with Aubrie Welsh Interiors, a frequent collaborator of theirs, on the job.  
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Moerlein adds restaurant to OTR taproom

Today, Christian Moerlein is holding a soft opening for Wienerwurst Mike Frankfurtary, a new restaurant at the brewery’s Over-the-Rhine taproom. The event marks the 161st anniversary of the founding of the original Moerlein brewery, and the 10th anniversary of the brewery’s renaissance.
 
The 19th-century deli and frankfurtary is named for the roaming sausage vendors who sold to hungry saloon goers in the OTR of the past. They were called Wienerwurst Mike.
 
The concept for the restaurant came from S&J Bakery and Café in Findlay Market.
 
Moerlein has tapped a new beer for the occasion, 10/161 Winter Warmer Ale, which was aged in bourbon barrels for three months. The beer has notes of vanilla and, of course, bourbon, as well as sharp oak tannins and rich chocolate malt.
 
Food will be served during taproom hours, plus Wednesday and Thursday from 4 to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday until midnight; and Sunday until 7 p.m.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Westfalen Lofts II offers condo living on future streetcar line

Westfalen Lofts II, located at 1426-1438 Race St. in Over-the-Rhine, is an extension of Westfalen Lofts. The project involved converting seven buildings into one condo development.
 
When completed, Westfalen II will include 33 for-sale units, plus about 4,000 square feet of commercial space right along the streetcar line. A few of the first-floor units have the ability to be sold as live/work spaces.
 
Units range in square footage from 531 square feet for a studio to 1,366 square feet for a two-bedroom. Prices range from about $90,000 to about $300,000. Units will go on sale in March.
 
Every fireplace in the original seven buildings was preserved for the development. Other features of the condos include sliding barn doors, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors and open floor plans.
 
Northpointe Group is the developer on the project.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

Nourish Yourself offers healthy, home-cooked meals to busy clients

After a 15-year career with P&G, Cherylanne Skolnicki became a certified health coach and started teaching people how to eat better. In January 2011, she started Nourish Yourself, a service that will cook dinner for you.
 
“The concept of a home-cooked meal resonates with busy families,” Skolnicki says. “Clients want to feed their families fresh, healthy, unprocessed, seasonal food, but struggle with the time and skills to cook those meals. We take the guesswork and challenge out of it.”
 
Nourish’s core team has three employees who focus on everything from customer care to menu development to marketing. A team of nine cooking partners go into clients’ homes and make the magic happen, Skolnicki says.
 
Clients are matched with a Nourish cooking partner in their area—they shop for and prepare meals in your kitchen. Meals are prepared all at once, and Nourish even cleans up afterward.
 
Nourish offers flexible pricing that starts at $159 per week plus groceries, and you choose the service date. Nourish’s winter menu is available on its website, with 50 entrée choices, many of which are freezable, plus fresh salad greens and homemade dressing.
 
The menu changes seasonally, but favorites include healthy makeovers of restaurant dishes, such as chicken enchiladas, Thai basil chicken and buffalo chicken meatballs. Skolnicki says both Nourish’s risotto with asparagus and peas and bison burger with Cabernet caramelized onions and white cheddar are also popular.
 
“Busy is the new reality for today’s families,” Skolnicki says. “We hope to make dining in the new normal for busy, health-conscious households. And cooking is one of the aspects of a healthy lifestyle that you can now outsource and still get all of the benefits.”
 
Today, Nourish serves the Greater Cincinnati area and northwest Arkansas (because of P&G employees), but Skolnicki hopes to expand to other markets in 2014.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

407 Over-the-Rhine Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts