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PAR Projects building new community space in Northside

PAR Projects recently purchased the parcel of land at 1622 Hoffner St. in Northside. Plans are currently underway to create an art and education center for the community.
 
The future home of PAR Projects is being constructed out of repurposed shipping containers, two of which you may have seen around Northside. All of the programming will be geared toward practical arts training, including teaching the elements of graphic design and video editing.
 
“Lots of different places offer painting and drawing classes, but there aren’t a lot that offer access to digital media and things that are valuable in creative workplaces,” says Jonathan Sears, executive director of PAR Projects.
 
The building will have three floors of usable space, or about 2,000 square feet. The first phase of the building will be five shipping containers joined together, with others stacked on top to form different floors.
 
The first step won’t actually be building, but rather creating a community space in the form of an open, outdoor movie theater. It will feature community screenings every two weeks or so; and the theater will actually be two containers stacked on top of each other near the front of the future building.
 
“We want to give the neighborhood a little more hope,” Sears says. “We plan to reach out to at-risk youth and provide more direction for them, as well as educate older people who need new skill sets.”
 
PAR Projects is partnering with the Apple Street Market Co-op initiative to host Northside Rising, a 50/50 fundraiser to benefit access to food and the arts. The event is Aug. 30, and will feature food, music and family activities.
 

Co-op market hopes to set up shop in former Northside Save-a-Lot

The Cincinnati Union Cooperative Initiative, a nonprofit that partners with organizations and individuals to create worker-owned businesses, is helping spearhead the grocery store effort in Northside. The group, along with the neighborhood, hopes to bring a grocery store co-op to the former Save-a-Lot building.
 
If fundraising goes according to plan, and enough community shares are sold by August 30, funding will be in place for the Apple Street Market Co-op to open in early 2015. But if that goal isn’t reached, the opening date will continue to be pushed back. 

Currently, almost 200 shares have been sold. Shares are $100, and are subsized for those who qualify for SNAP or free or reduced lunch.
 
Last fall, Save-a-Lot, which was the last convenient grocery store in the Northside area, closed. Now, the closest stores are the Kroger on Kenard and the one in North College Hill. They’re not easily accessible by riding Metro, and they’re not ideal for people who need that one last ingredient to make dinner.
 
“One of the reasons we think this co-op will succeed is because it’s important to have accessible food nearby,” says Casey Whitten-Amadon, legal consultant for CUCI.
 
Because of the lack of food access nearby, Northside is considered a food desert. The only options are fast food, which isn’t necessarily healthy, and convenience stores, which often mark up prices on basic items like bread, milk and eggs. Having a grocery store back in the neighborhood will help increase foot traffic to surrounding businesses, and will bring jobs to the area.
 
The Apple Street Market will be a full-service grocery store, with larger than average produce, organic and local food sections, as well as paper products and beauty products. Local food will be sourced through connections with Our Harvest, which will help Apple Street Market work with local farmers and butchers to get products you can’t find at Kroger, Whitten-Amadon says.
 
The co-op will offer unionized wages, as well as worker-ownership options. It will also be affordable for customers of all income levels, and accessible to those walking, biking, riding the bus or driving a car.
 
“Having a high-end grocery store wouldn’t solve the access problem,” Whitten-Amadon says. “That kind of model wouldn’t be sustainable in Northside.”
 
If you’re interested in purchasing a share in the co-op or want to learn more about it, come to Northside Rising, a 50/50 community fundraising event with PAR Projects, on Aug. 30 at 1622 Hoffner St.
 

ArtWalks bring temporary public art to communities

The community was invited to help paint the crosswalk, or ArtWalk, at Main and Melindy streets in Over-the-Rhine during the neighborhood’s Second Sunday on Main. Artists Beth Graves, Pam Kravetz and Carla Morales designed and painted the outline of the crosswalk, aptly named “Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road?”
 
About 50 community members painted as little or as much of the crosswalk as they wanted.
 
“The most expensive part of any street painting is closing the street, so Second Sunday was a great time and place to do it,” says Margy Waller, Serendipity Director for Art on the Streets.
 
Another crosswalk will be painted during next month’s event, and Waller says they hope to have one or two painted at every Second Sunday between now and October.
 
Art on the Streets will also have an ArtWalk painting during the Walnut Hills Cincy Summer Streets on July 19, which was designed and outlined by Graves. There are also plans to have an ArtWalk at Northside’s Cincy Summer Streets on Aug. 24.
 
“ArtWalks reflect the vibrancy that the arts bring to neighborhoods, and show how arts bring people together,” Waller says.
 
The Main Street ArtWalks are being funded by a grant from Cincy Sundaes and a matching grant from The Greater Cincinnati Foundation’s Big Idea Challenge. The Walnut Hill’s ArtWalk is being funded by Interact for Health and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation.

Cincy Summer Streets brings car-free fun to Walnut Hills, Northside

Tomorrow, a mile-long stretch of E. McMillan Street and Woodburn Avenue between Gilbert Avenue and Madison Road will be closed to cars, but open to pedestrians, bicyclists, skateboarders and rollerbladers from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Walnut Hills.
 
Cincy Summer Streets is based on similar events held in cities like Indianapolis, Louisville, New York City, Portland and Chicago to promote local businesses and community—all without cars.
 
Activities, which are free, include sidewalk painting, yoga, belly dancing, pottery, jazz dancing, a flash mob and hula hooping from a variety of local businesses. There will also be an ArtWalk crosswalk painting, held by Art in the Streets, where anyone can help create a piece of temporary public art.
 
The second Cincy Summer Streets will be held on August 24 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Northside. Hamilton Avenue will be closed between Pullan and Spring Grove avenues, and Blue Rock Street will be closed between Cherry Street and Dane Avenue.
 
Northside’s event will include activities from Happen Inc., My Nose Turns Red, Spun Bicycles, Galaxie Skate Shop, Queen City Bike, Wump Mucket Puppets, Word Play, Yoga Ah and more.
 
Each route is situated within the neighborhood’s local business district with locally owned shops and restaurants to enjoy, as well as the street activities. Cincy Summer Streets is accessible in both Walnut Hills and Northside by bike, bus and car, with street parking available nearby.
 
Cincy Summer Streets is sponsored by The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation and Interact for Health.
 
Follow Cincy Summer Streets on Twitter @cincystreets, #cincystreets and on Instagram @cincystreets.

Northside restaurant to bring sports and international food together

This fall, Northside will welcome another new restaurant, World Cup, located at 4023 Hamilton Ave. The sports bar will cater to all kinds of sports, and will feature international cuisine.
 
Owner Alex Kuhns, who has worked in about 15 restaurants, is a huge soccer fan, and says that when watches games at English and Irish pubs, something is missing.
 
“Our menu will represent soccer itself, in that every item is inspired by a different nation,” he says.
 
Menu highlights include an Ivory Coast Pizza, topped with curry spices, bananas, spiced peanuts and ground beef; a French pizza, topped with mushrooms, pesto and roasted garlic; Spanish fries with Romesco sour cream and red onions; and chicken wings, a Puerto Rican style with a jerk rub and a Mexican style with chipotle, lime and cilantro.
 
Kuhns says the menu will rotate to reflect the winners of different sporting events. For example, since Germany beat Brazil in the World Cup, the restaurant would feature a special German dish.
 
World Cup will have 10-12 TVs airing different sporting events, including Bengals games. They’ll also have at least 20 beers on tap, with local, international, craft and mainstream brews.
 
The 5,000-square-foot restaurant will have seating for 115 people. Two garage doors will open onto the street, but without seating on the sidewalk.
 
“It’s going to be a big open space, nothing stuffy,” Kuhns says. “One of my friends’ dads described it as ‘gemuchlikeit,’ which means carefree.”
 
He wants World Cup to be a community gathering space for neighborhood groups and parties. The restaurant will feature a large stage for music and game tables, including foosball, pool and darts.

Eleven local projects receive state historic tax credits

The Ohio Development Services Agency recently awarded $37.7 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits to rehabilitate 35 historic buildings in 13 communities across the state. Eleven of those projects are in Cincinnati, for a total of $6.2 million in tax credits.
 
A three-story building at 412-414 E. 13th St. received $150,000 in tax credits. Model Group plans to rehab the structure into five residential apartments. The project’s total cost is $831,314.
 
433 E. 13th St. received $245,000 in tax credits. The building was rehabbed several decades ago, but has decayed over time. It will house eight apartments and 1,200 square feet of retail space, and will feature a bike storage space for each tenant. The project’s total cost is $1,495,029.
 
The four-story building at 501 E. 13th St. in Over-the-Rhine is across the street from 433 E. 13th St. It received $136,500 in tax credits, and will house four apartments and first floor commercial space. The total cost will be $834,055.
 
Two buildings across from Findlay Market at 1818 and 1826 Race St. received $1,650,500 in tax credits. In a partnership between Model Group and the Corporation for Findlay Market, the buildings will become 15 apartments and more than 28,000 square feet of commercial office space and first floor retail space. The project’s total cost is $8,503,167.
 
Emanuel Community Center at 1308 Race St. received $248,017 in tax credits. The former gym will become squash courts for a new squash-based youth enrichment program, and office space at the front of the building will be used for tech and startup firms. Grandin Properties will use the tax credits to rehab the building’s fourth floor. The total cost is $5,101,146.
 
The Globe Building, located at 1801-1805 Elm St., will be home to People’s Liberty, an initiative of The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation, and first floor retail space. The $4,886,992 project received $540,000 in tax credits.
 
The Landman Building, located at 3929 Spring Grove Ave., received $223,650 in tax credits. It was built in 1926, was stabilized by the Northside Business Association and sold to South Block Properties, Ltd. It will be rehabbed as a mixed-use facility for an arcade bar on the first floor and four one-bedroom apartments on the second floor. The total cost is $1,140,681.
 
Sorg Mansion in Middletown received $212,500 in tax credits. The 27-room mansion will be fully rehabbed to become an owner-occupied bed and breakfast. It’s the first Middletown project to receive state historic tax credits. The total project cost is $1,319,000.
 
St. John’s Church, located at 1205 Elm St., will be redeveloped into a bar and event space in the former sanctuary and balcony. It received $490,000 in tax credits, and the project’s total cost is $4.5 million.
 
Buildings at 703-707 Race St., 22-24, 26-30 and 106 W. Seventh St. will be jointly rehabbed to create 75 market-rate apartments and first floor retail space. The project received $1.45 million in tax credits, and will cost $14,656,862.
 
Windsor School, located at 937 Windsor St., received $900,578 in tax credits. Cincinnati Public Schools operated the building until 2004, and it was later sold at auction. Core Redevelopment plans to redevelop it into 44 market-rate apartments, and the now-empty southern portion of the property will become 48 new-build units. The project’s total cost is $9,139,567.
 
 

Kirby Road School to become 40 apartments

Later this year, the former Kirby Road School in Northside will become an apartment complex, developed by Bloomfield/Schon+Partners. The school was purchased at a Cincinnati Public Schools auction for $230,000 in 2012.
 
The $4.2 million Kirby Lofts project will convert the 50,000-square-foot, three-story building into 40 apartments, which could be completed by June 2015. The former gym will become three two-story, loft-style apartments, and the auditorium will become a 1,800-square-foot unit with 20-foot ceilings.
 
Much of the exterior of the building will remain, along with the preservation of the building’s Rookwood tile, cabinets, trim, doors and blackboards.  
 
Kirby Road School was built in 1910, and closed in 2005. It temporarily housed Chase School before closing for good in late 2012. It’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Bloomfield/Schon also redeveloped Northside’s American Can Lofts. The city granted a property tax abatement that will be worth $130,000 annually for eight years, and Bloomfield/Schon already received $600,000 in state preservation tax credits.
 
Plans are still in the works, and bids are being sought for the construction work.

Bourbon bar opening this summer in Northside

In June, Northside will welcome a bourbon bar to the neighborhood. The Littlefield, which will be located at 3930 Spring Grove Ave., is an idea that has been in the works for about five years.
 
“All four of us owners live in Northside,” says co-owner Matt Distel. “It’s where we choose to spend our time and money.”
 
Two of the owners are developers, and have started to get control of a number of buildings in the neighborhood. The Littlefield will actually be housed in one of those buildings.
 
The physical space is only about 400 square feet, but Distel says that the outdoor deck and patio are about triple that size.
 
Distel says they’re also looking to partner with Northside nonprofits and art organizations to focus on what makes the neighborhood fun and interesting.
 
“We want to highlight those organizations, and maybe have drinks specials or nights where we can help promote their events,” he says.
 
The Littlefield won’t just focus on bourbon, but will serve regional and craft-based beer and other alcohol, as well. Cocktails will be bourbon-based, with housemade bitters, and some will be cask-aged. Distel and the other owners are partnering with Shoshana Hafner, the former chef at Honey, on the menu, which will feature her take on typical bar food.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Kintimate Costumes expands in owner's Northside home

Lucia Jackson, a busy mother and corporate retail consultant, went to school to design wedding gowns. But somewhere along the line, her love of costumes turned into a business she runs from her Northside home. On June 14, Kintimate Costumes is holding a mod-themed open house to celebrate its expansion.
 
Jackson’s three-bedroom home at 1522 Knowlton will soon be full of costumes. Since its founding in 2011, Jackson has operated Kintimate from the house’s attic, but her inventory has grown exponentially since then.
 
“The costumes started to burst the seams of the attic, and I knew it was time to expand,” Jackson says. “No matter how much inventory I have, this house will be able to store it.”
 
With so much growth in Northside, Jackson says she’s in a prime location. Twenty new apartments will soon be built next door to her, and another 80 are going in across the street. “I hope that those 100 people will need costumes,” she says.
 
Jackson has something new in store for costume lovers and party-goers. Kintimate will now be offering a party planning option, with parties held at Jackson’s house or with Kintimate throwing a party at another location.
 
Although she hasn’t done any advertising for the party planning, she has already hosted a number of gatherings, from bachelorette parties to baby showers to a wedding reception for 500 guests.
 
“My friends and I recently dressed up as Disney princesses for a 4-year-old’s birthday party,” Jackson says. “We showed up, had cake and read the kids stories. It’s probably the most beautiful thing I’ve ever done.”
 
For the 2014-2015 school year, Kintimate is partnering with Cincinnati Public Schools through School Aids. Jackson wants to work with schools’ theatrical departments to teach kids how to find costumes, research them and make them rather than hiring a company like Kintimate to make them. With that, when a school is finished with a costume, Kintimate will then rent or sell it, with the proceeds from each sale or rental going back to the original designer.
 
“I would love to see us working with students from DAAP and independent designers,” Jackson says. “They could use the program as a great jumping off point. And I would love to see my costumes attached to a number of designers.”
 
Jackson has big dreams for Kintimate—in a few years, she would love to see a number of locations, each with a team of designers busy making costumes.
 
“When I was a teenager, my dad told me that I couldn’t party the rest of my life,” she says. “I think that’s the only thing he’s ever been wrong about.”
 
For starters, Kintimate will be open three or four days through the weekend, from noon to 6 or 7 p.m. It will always be available for appointments, and parties can be booked any time. 
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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NKY Galaxie Skateshop opening second location in Northside

Galaxie Skateshop has been operating in Newport for just over six years, and on March 1, owners Gary Collins and Zach Kincaid are opening their second location in Northside.
 
“Galaxie will be a centrally located place for skateboarders to grab their gear, meet up and help dispel the myth that skateboarding is a negative activity,” Collins says.
 
Collins and Kincaid remodeled and renovated the 1,200-square-foot shop on Hamilton Avenue themselves. The shop will sell anything and everything that revolves around the skateboard culture, from boards and apparel to footwear and accessories.
 
“We’ve always wanted to do a shop in Northside,” Collins says. “It’s the most diverse and artistic part of Cincinnati that attracts a lot of skateboarders, musicians and creative types that have connections to the skateboard culture.”
 
Galaxie is 100 percent skater-owned, Collins says, who has been in the skateboarding business for more than 20 years. He’s been running Instrument Skateboards for the last eight or so, and he plans to carry it and other local brands like Absorb, Hella Cool, OATW, Curb Cult and Revive in the store.
 
Collins is also the driving force, both financially and physically, of the Newport DIY skatepark Under471.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Nourish Yourself offers healthy, home-cooked meals to busy clients

After a 15-year career with P&G, Cherylanne Skolnicki became a certified health coach and started teaching people how to eat better. In January 2011, she started Nourish Yourself, a service that will cook dinner for you.
 
“The concept of a home-cooked meal resonates with busy families,” Skolnicki says. “Clients want to feed their families fresh, healthy, unprocessed, seasonal food, but struggle with the time and skills to cook those meals. We take the guesswork and challenge out of it.”
 
Nourish’s core team has three employees who focus on everything from customer care to menu development to marketing. A team of nine cooking partners go into clients’ homes and make the magic happen, Skolnicki says.
 
Clients are matched with a Nourish cooking partner in their area—they shop for and prepare meals in your kitchen. Meals are prepared all at once, and Nourish even cleans up afterward.
 
Nourish offers flexible pricing that starts at $159 per week plus groceries, and you choose the service date. Nourish’s winter menu is available on its website, with 50 entrée choices, many of which are freezable, plus fresh salad greens and homemade dressing.
 
The menu changes seasonally, but favorites include healthy makeovers of restaurant dishes, such as chicken enchiladas, Thai basil chicken and buffalo chicken meatballs. Skolnicki says both Nourish’s risotto with asparagus and peas and bison burger with Cabernet caramelized onions and white cheddar are also popular.
 
“Busy is the new reality for today’s families,” Skolnicki says. “We hope to make dining in the new normal for busy, health-conscious households. And cooking is one of the aspects of a healthy lifestyle that you can now outsource and still get all of the benefits.”
 
Today, Nourish serves the Greater Cincinnati area and northwest Arkansas (because of P&G employees), but Skolnicki hopes to expand to other markets in 2014.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Neighborhood Enhancement Program aims to improve Cincinnati quality of life

Cincinnati’s Neighborhood Enhancement Program, a 90-day collaborative effort between city departments, neighborhood residents and community organizations, focuses on developing the assets of individual neighborhoods.
 
By focusing, integrating and concentrating city service delivery and community redevelopment efforts, the NEP’s goal is to improve the quality of life in Cincinnati. Examples of integrated service delivery include concentrating building code enforcement; identifying and “cooling down” crime hot spots; cleaning up streets, sidewalks and vacant lots; beautifying landscapes, streetscapes and public right-of-ways; and engaging property owners and residents to create and sustain a more livable neighborhood. Targeted areas are identified through an analysis of building code violations, vacant buildings, disorder and drug calls, drug arrests, graffiti, junk autos, litter and weeds.
 
Neighborhoods with the most successful NEPs have taken key steps before the program begins, while it’s taking place and after it has ended. To date, Price Hill, Avondale, Northside, Clifton Heights/University Heights/Fairview, Westwood, Evanston, College Hill, Madisonville, Mt. Washington, Corryville, Over-the-Rhine, Bond Hill, Kennedy Heights, Pendleton, Mt. Airy and Carthage have participated in the NEP program.

East Price Hill and Walnut Hills are participating in the program this year.
 
Before beginning the NEP, a neighborhood must consider its community’s commitment to the program. Stakeholders must agree on what needs to be done in the neighborhood, and want to improve the neighborhood as a whole. An NEP Steering Committee needs to be established, which is made up of a community council representative, a business association representative, a redevelopment agency representative (if applicable) and a resident who lives in the neighborhood, and come up with a list of goals to accomplish within the NEP time frame.
 
The NEP has won numerous awards, including the President’s Award from the Ohio Conference for Community Development.

Check out Soapbox's "Hot 'Hoods" features on Price Hill and Walnut Hills to see NEP practices in action.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Northside art gallery features modernist art by local artists

Object, a new art gallery and retail store in Northside, features modernist pieces from the early 20th century. Artists Keith Chrapliwy of Modology and Andrew Kozakov teamed up to offer a range of art-driven furniture, paintings, sculpture and small objects.
 
Items run an artistic range that starts with early 20th century-inspired Constructivist paintings and sculpture, and continues through the 1950s living room culture. It finishes with chairs of the 1950s and 1970s by designers like Eames and Kofod-Lawson. There are also restored and reworked items like valises and small tables, paintings in new styles and a small collection of creatively made jewelry. Object’s collection will vary as Chrapliwy and Kozakov bring in new pieces from their collections.
 
Chrapliwy and Kozakov made a large number of the furniture and artwork pieces—Chrapliwy’s walnut Modology cabinets are in high demand, and are colorful with handmade Lucite panels; Kozakov focuses more on furniture, including a tall, elegant wooden sculpture that contains a hidden bar cabinet that’s large enough to hold glasses and wine.
 
“We want to blur the line between high art and functional pieces,” Chrapliwy says. “We both hope that visitors to the store can envision the possibilities of creating their own artistic environment.”
 
The store, which is located at 4008 Hamilton Ave., also has work by other artists, including Spencer van der Zee, a Cincinnati folk artist, and jewelry designer Brie Hiudt, who is Object’s guest artist through December.
 
Items range in price from $16 for T-shirts by van der Zee, to $25 for a metal case, to $2,750 for the handmade bar cabinet.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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Queen City Cookies opens Northside cafe

Peggy Shannon moved to Cincinnati in 2006, and started baking cookies out of her home. As Queen City Cookies grew, a café seemed like the next logical step. Shannon recently opened a four-room café in the old St. Pius Church complex in Northside.
 
The café, which is inside the former rectory, consists of an espresso bar and a pop-up Madisono’s gelato shop. There are also two whimsical seating areas and ceramic tiled staircases. 
 
The partnership with Madisono’s has allowed Shannon’s sweet treats to now be served ala mode. Special flavors of gelato were designed in conjunction with Queen City’s schnecken as well.
 
Queen City also welcomed former co-owner of Take the Cake, Doug Faulkner, to the team. “Doug has brought so many new things to the table,” Shannon says. “We now have croschnecken, which is half croissant and half schnecken. We also have a bread pudding made from schnecken.”
 
Another addition to Queen City’s team was Michelle Lightfoot, the former owner of Poppies and Deli seven20. Shannon and Lightfoot have plans to roll out a light, limited lunch menu of soups and sandwiches in early 2014.
 
The expansion has also allowed for a line of pastries Queen City didn’t have room for before. The bakery’s menu now includes vegan items from Sweet Peace Bakery and gluen-free choices from local sources.
 
“One of the only downsides to our expansion is that I don’t bake anymore,” Shannon says. “I used to have a hand in everything, but now I’m more into research and development of new things.”
 
Queen City recently applied for a liquor license, and there are plans to offer cooking classes and host parties. Now, Shannon is encouraging customers to utilize the café for meetings.

And as if expanding isn't enough, each quarter, Queen City also raises money and awareness for a different nonprofit. This quarter, they're supporting Caracole, the first organization in Ohio to provide housing for people living with HIV/AIDS. The product to buy to support Caracole is Queen City's blueberry schnecken, served by the slice or in loaves. People can also help out by donating toiletries at Queen City.

Queen City also supports organizations online through Cookies for a Cause. This quarter, 50 percent of the sales of Queen City’s version of Brooksters, which is a rich brownie bottom, a double stuffed Oreo middle and a chocolate chip cookie on top, goes to WordPlay.
 
The café is open Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
 
By Caitlin Koenig
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PAR Projects creating garden along Mill Creek Trail

A new sculpture park and edible garden is being constructed along Mill Creek Trail in Northside, at the intersection of William P. Dooley Bypass and Ludlow Avenue. The garden is a partnership between PAR Projects and Groundwork Cincinnati/Mill Creek, and it recently received a $25,000 grant from the U.S. Conference of Mayors and Scotts Miracle-Gro Company.
 
The acre of land is being developed in an effort to help beautify the Mill Creek Trail. It is an ongoing project, which began last October, and the next stage is to be completed in the spring, says Jonathan Sears, Executive Director of PAR Projects.
 
The garden, which used to be a parking lot, will include a number of sculptures, four of which are already installed. One is an abstract interpretation of a fishing bobber in the water by Ben Lock from Bowling Green. The second is a 16-foot ear of corn buried in a field, which represents PAR’s cornfield project, by Sean Mullany from Cincinnati. The third sculpture is an abstract tree with a bird on one of the branches by local artist Kate Demske. The fourth, by Meg Mitchell of Madison, Wisc., is a geodesic dome that is about 75 percent complete—the vegetation still needs to be planted inside.
 
PAR is currently looking at an artist from Kansas City to complete the fifth piece, which they envision to be whimsical. The sculptures will rotate on a two-year basis.
 
“The idea is to not try to cram sculptures into the garden, but create a feel-good space,” Sears says. “The sculptures will rotate much like the plants and the colors do from season to season.”
 
The garden will also have edible fruits and vegetables, which will rotate in and out as the weather and seasons permit. Sears says he spoke to a couple who said they’ve used some of the garden’s corn in their meals recently.
 
“We see the garden as a way to liven up Northside on a micro level rather than on the macro level,” Sears says. “We hope to also get the conversation going about public sculpture, as well as provide a pleasant area for trail walkers.”
 
By Caitlin Koenig
Follow Caitlin on Twitter

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